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A 21st Century Ethical Toolbox,9780195130409
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A 21st Century Ethical Toolbox

by
ISBN13:

9780195130409

ISBN10:
0195130405
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
12/14/2000
Publisher(s):
Oxford University Press

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Summary

Taking a refreshingly hands-on approach to introductory ethics, A 21st Century Ethical Toolbox provides students with a set of tools to help them understand and make a constructive difference in real-life moral controversies. Thoroughly optimistic, it invites students to approach ethical issues with a reconstructive intent, making room for more and better options than the traditional "pro" and "con" positions that have grown up around tough problems like abortion and animal rights. Ideal for introductory and applied ethics courses, this unique text does not treat ethics as a purely academic, historical, or theoretical subject, but as a wide-ranging and ongoing set of challenges that calls for multiple and interwoven kinds of intelligence. It covers the skills that are most vital to making real progress in ethics, including paying careful attention to the values at stake on all sides of an issue; looking for creative opportunities within difficult problems; critical-thinking skills such as defining key terms and making sure to judge similar cases alike; and learning how to engage in constructive dialogue. Instructors can readily use the experiential and applied activities inspired by this "toolbox" of practical skills to design an interactive and collaborative ethics course. Students can carry these essential skills directly from this book into such projects as campaigning for environmental awareness and staffing local homeless shelters. In addition to his own discussion, Weston includes gripping and provocative short selections from essayists, activists, and philosophers, and also cites his own students. Extensive "Exercises and Notes" sections end each chapter, and a detailed appendix offers instructors advice on how to use the Toolbox in the classroom.

Author Biography

Anthony Weston teaches philosophy and environmental studies at Elon College, North Carolina, and serves as Master Teacher in Elon's Global Studies program.

Table of Contents

Preface vii
Welcome to the Ethical Toolbox 1(8)
I GETTING STARTED
Ethics as a Learning Experience
9(24)
The Need for Open Minds
9(2)
Three Easy Routes to a Closed Mind (and How to Avoid Them)
11(10)
Reading: C. P. Ellis, interviewed
21(8)
Studs Terkel
Exercises and Notes
29(4)
Ethics and Religion
33(16)
Religion's Contributions to Ethics
33(2)
Religion's Limits in Ethics
35(4)
Thinking for Yourself
39(4)
Exercises and Notes
43(6)
II VALUES
Paying Attention to Values
49(19)
Definitions: Values and Moral Values
49(4)
Guidelines
53(5)
Reading: Edward Abbey, ``The Great American Desert''
58(6)
Exercises and Notes
64(4)
Families of Moral Values
68(15)
Three Families of Moral Values
68(7)
Mapping Moral Debates
75(4)
Exercises and Notes
79(4)
Some Traditional Ethical Theories
83(20)
Utilitarianism
83(6)
Theories of Right Action
89(5)
Theories of Virtue
94(5)
Exercises and Notes
99(4)
When Values Clash: Theoretical Approaches
103(14)
Utlitarian Strategies: Finding a Single Measure
103(3)
Non-Utilitarian Strategies: Prioritizing Values
106(2)
When Theories Stalemate
108(6)
Exercises and Notes
114(3)
When Values Clash: Integrative Approaches
117(20)
Another View of Moral Conflicts
117(3)
Integrative Methods
120(4)
When to Hold Firm
124(3)
Reading: Roger Rosenblatt, ``How to End the Abortion War''
127(4)
Exercises and Notes
131(6)
III TOOLS FOR CRITICAL THINKING IN ETHICS
Finding the Facts
137(10)
When Facts Are at Issue
137(3)
Inferences
140(4)
Exercises and Notes
144(3)
Watching Words
147(13)
Loaded Language
147(1)
When Terms Are Unclear
148(1)
When Terms Are Contested
149(7)
Exercises and Notes
156(4)
Judging Like Cases Alike
160(19)
Consistency Is Not Easy
160(2)
How to Restore Consistency
162(2)
Invented Cases
164(3)
Reading: Colin McGinn, ``Speciesism''
167(6)
Exercises and Notes
173(6)
IV TOOLS FOR CREATIVITY IN ETHICS
Multiplying Options
179(11)
The Need for Inventiveness in Ethics
179(2)
How to ``Get Out of the Box''
181(3)
More Provocations: ``What If . . . ?'' Thinking
184(2)
Exercises and Notes
186(4)
Problem-Shifting
190(13)
Reframing Problems
190(2)
Making the Problem an Opportunity
192(6)
Exercises and Notes
198(5)
V PUTTING ETHICS INTO ACTION
Picking the Right Tools
203(15)
Know What Your Goals Are
203(2)
Matching Tools to Goals
205(11)
Exercises and Notes
216(2)
Dialogue: Learning By Talking
218(20)
How to Have a Fruitless Debate
218(3)
How to Have a Useful Discussion
221(7)
Reading: The Common Ground Network for Life and Choice, ``Common Ground Rules''
228(6)
Exercises and Notes
234(4)
Service: Learning by Helping
238(19)
Calls to Service
238(5)
Visits to a Homeless Shelter
243(5)
Reading: Ram Dass and Paul Gorman, ``Compassion: The Witness Within''
248(4)
Exercises and Notes
252(5)
VI CONTEMPORARY ISSUES
Sexuality
257(22)
Who Cares About Sex?
257(3)
Can We Build on Sexual Common Ground?
260(2)
``Perversion''
262(5)
Reading: Jason Schultz, ``Bachelor Party''
267(7)
Exercises and Notes
274(5)
Abortion
279(20)
Background
279(3)
Key Values
282(4)
Can We Get the Abortion Debate Unstuck?
286(3)
Reading: Rayna Rapp, ``XYLO''
289(6)
Exercises and Notes
295(4)
Business and Professional Ethics
299(22)
Ethics and Professions
299(5)
Ethics and Business
304(5)
Reading: Lisa Newton and David Schmidt, ``Obviously a Major Malfunction''
309(8)
Exercises and Notes
317(4)
Poverty and Welfare
321(24)
Background
321(2)
Shared Values
323(3)
Understanding Poverty
326(3)
Reading: Rosemary Bray, ``So How Did I Get Here?''
329(8)
Exercises and Notes
337(8)
VII THE EXPANDING CIRCLE
Animals
345(19)
Why Should We Care About Animals?
345(4)
What Can We Do?
349(4)
Reading: Lorri Bauston, ``Animal Rescue''
353(6)
Exercises and Notes
359(5)
Environmental Ethics
364(19)
Wake-up Calls
364(1)
Beyond Anthropocentrism?
365(3)
Integrating Environmental Values
368(5)
Reading: Violet Woodsorrel Oxalis, ``It's a Little Wild Out There''
373(5)
Exercises and Notes
378(5)
Notes for Teachers: The Toolbox in the Classroom 383(21)
Index 404


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