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ACSM's Resources for the Personal Trainer : Techniques, Complications, and Management,9780781790536
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ACSM's Resources for the Personal Trainer : Techniques, Complications, and Management

by Unknown
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780781790536

ISBN10:
0781790530
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
7/21/2006
Publisher(s):
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
List Price: $70.34
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Summary

This valuable resource is the official ACSM preparatory tool for the ACSM Certified Personal Trainer(SM) exam and provides coverage of fitness assessment, exercise prescription, and exercise leadership along with discussions of anatomy and physiology, injury prevention, psychology, emergency techniques, exercise leadership programs, and legal issues. It includes the fundamental knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) used to improve, maintain, and/or optimize health-related components of physical fitness and performance. The Second Edition is now in full color and includes information on writing appropriate exercise recommendations, leading and demonstrating safe and effective methods of exercise, and motivating individuals.

Table of Contents

Preface vii
PART I: INTRODUCTION TO THE FIELD AND PROFESSION OF PERSONAL TRAINING
Introduction to Personal Training
2(14)
Mike Niederpruem
Cody Sipe
The Fitness Industry--An Overview of the Landscape
3(1)
The Profession of Personal Training
4(4)
The Definition of a Personal Trainer
5(1)
Becoming a Personal Trainer
6(1)
The Backgrounds of Personal Trainers
6(2)
Professional Work Environments
8(2)
For-Profit
8(1)
Not-for-Profit
8(1)
Corporate
9(1)
ACSM's Role and the Educational Continuum
10(1)
Identification of a Core Body of Knowledge
10(1)
Development and Continuous Revision of Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs)
10(1)
Establishing Your Knowledge Base
11(2)
The Exercise Sciences
11(1)
Developing Your Tool Kit
12(1)
Ethics and Professional Conduct
13(3)
Code of Ethics for ACSM Certified and Registered Professionals
13(1)
Principles and Standards for Candidates of ACSM Certification Examinations
14(1)
Public Disclosure of Affiliation
14(1)
Discipline
15(1)
Career Track for Professional Personal Trainers
16(10)
Nicki Andersen
Kenneth E. Baldwin
Becoming a Personal Trainer
19(1)
Organizing Your Career Pathway
19(3)
Education
22(1)
Continuing Education
23(1)
Developing Business Relationships
23(1)
Establishing a Client Base
23(1)
Community Involvement
23(1)
Medical Affiliations
24(1)
Building a Solid Professional Foundation
24(1)
Personal Trainer's Role As Teacher and Educator
24(1)
Being Well-Rounded---It's More Than Counting Reps
24(1)
Practices, Standards, and Ethics
24(2)
PART II: THE EDUCATIONAL APPROACH TO PERSONAL TRAINING
Education-Based Personal Training Programs
26(26)
Kenneth E. Baldwin
Why Focus on a Process of Education for Your Clients?
28(1)
The Personal Trainer As Educator
29(1)
The Educational Model
29(1)
Bloom's Mastery Learning Model
30(1)
Gage and Berliner's Model
30(1)
The Primary Elements of Successful Educational Models
30(3)
The Nine Principles of Learning
31(1)
The VAK Learning Preferences: Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic Learners
32(1)
The Three E's to Successful Training
32(1)
The Education-Based Personal Trainer
33(1)
Education-Based Training Preparation
33(12)
Personal Training Is a Sequential Process
33(5)
Data Gathering
38(1)
The Client Needs Analysis
38(1)
Goals and Objectives
39(2)
Exercise Program Development and Implementation
41(1)
Observation, Evaluation, and Feedback
41(4)
The Session Plan
45(2)
The Flowchart
47(5)
The Education-Based Personal Trainer--Client Relationship
52(13)
Kenneth E. Baldwin
Terry Ferebee Eckmann
The Client As a Student
53(1)
Establish Teaching and Learning Strategies
53(1)
Establish the Learning Climate
53(1)
Establish the Focus of Intelligent Learning
54(2)
The Student As Learner: Learning Principles Applied to Personal Training
54(2)
Building the Client's Learning Profile
56(1)
How Clients Learn: The VAK Learning Preferences
57(4)
Learning Style Preference Assessment
58(3)
The Learning-Motivated Client
61(4)
Motivation Part 1: The Academic Motivation Model (ARCS)
61(1)
The ARCS Model and Personal Training
61(1)
Motivation Part 2: Six Variables of Motivation
62(1)
Motivation Part 3: Galbraith's Motivational Strategies
63(2)
Education-Based Personal Trainer Development
65(14)
Kenneth E. Baldwin
Terry Ferebee Eckmann
More Skills for the Education-Based Personal Trainer
66(4)
Communication Skills and Education-Based Personal Training
66(1)
Developing Your Communication Skills
67(2)
Basic Preparation of the Personal Training Session
69(1)
The VAK Learning Preferences Combined with Optimum Learning Strategies
70(2)
Strategies for the Visual Learner
70(1)
Strategies for the Auditory Learner
71(1)
Strategies for the Kinesthetic Learner
72(1)
The Education-Based Movement Demonstration
72(3)
Preparation
73(1)
Demonstration
74(1)
Client Practice
74(1)
Observation, Evaluation, and Feedback
74(1)
Anticipating Your First Client
75(1)
Six Steps to Becoming an Education-Based Personal Trainer
75(4)
PART III: LEARNING THE FOUNDATIONS OF EXERCISE SCIENCE AND IMPORTANT RELATED DISCIPLINES
Exercise Physiology
79(30)
Stanley Sai-chuen Hui
Overview of Exercise Physiology
80(1)
Definition of Exercise Physiology
81(1)
Cardiovascular System
81(7)
The Heart
81(1)
Tissue Coverings and Layers of the Heart
81(1)
Chambers, Valves, and Blood Flow of the Heart
82(1)
The Blood Vessels
83(1)
Cardiac Function
83(1)
Measuring Pulses
84(2)
Acute Response to Cardiovascular Exercise
86(2)
Respiratory System
88(4)
Control of Breathing
88(1)
Distribution of Ventilation
88(2)
Ventilatory Pump
90(2)
Energy Systems
92(3)
Aerobic and Anaerobic Metabolism
92(1)
Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP)
93(1)
Creatine Phosphate (CP)
93(1)
Anaerobic Glycolysis
94(1)
Aerobic Oxidation
94(1)
Recovery from Exercise
95(1)
Muscular System
95(5)
Skeletal Muscles
96(1)
Muscle Contraction
96(1)
Muscle Contraction and Training
97(1)
Muscle Fiber Types
98(1)
Neuromuscular Activation
99(1)
Skeletal System
100(1)
Structure and Function of Joints in Movement
100(1)
Neurological System
100(3)
Central Nervous System
101(1)
Peripheral Nervous System
101(1)
Autonomic Nervous System
102(1)
Neuromuscular Control
102(1)
Exercise System Adaptations---Strength, Cardiovascular, Flexibility
103(6)
Resistance Training
103(1)
Chronic Adaptations to Cardiovascular Exercise
104(1)
Cardiovascular Adaptations
104(1)
Flexibility
105(4)
Anatomy, Kinesiology, and Biomechanics
109(68)
John Mayer
Biomechanics and Kinesiology
110(1)
Describing Body Position and Joint Movement
110(4)
Anatomical Position
110(1)
Planes of Motion and Axes of Rotation
110(1)
Center of Gravity, Line of Gravity, and Postural Alignment
111(3)
Joint Movement
114(1)
Musculoskeletal Anatomy
114(12)
Skeletal System
115(1)
Articular System
116(3)
Muscular System
119(7)
Specific Joint Structures
126(51)
Upper Extremity
126(19)
Lower Extremity
145(21)
Spine
166(11)
Motor Learning for the Personal Trainer
177(10)
Howard Zelaznik
Strength Development and Learning
178(1)
Motor Learning Defined
179(1)
Measurement of Motor Learning
179(1)
Characteristics of Motor Learning
180(2)
Power Law of Learning
181(1)
Stages of Learning
181(1)
Neurological Considerations
182(1)
What is the Nature of Motor Skill Representation?
182(1)
Goals of Training
182(1)
Principles of Practice
183(4)
Specificity of Practice Principle
183(1)
Knowledge of Results and Knowledge of Performance
183(1)
Frequency of Knowledge of Results and Knowledge of Performance
184(1)
Precision and/or Amount of Information Provided
184(1)
Blocked versus Random Practice Schedules
184(1)
Variable versus Constant Practice
185(1)
Demonstrations
185(2)
Pedagogy and the Client Learning Program
187(21)
Terry Ferebee Eckmann
Pedagogy and Training
188(1)
The Personal Trainer's Role As an Educator
188(1)
Effective Teaching Skills of an Educator/Personal Trainer
189(1)
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
190(1)
Component 1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Pedagogical Skills
190(1)
Component 1b: Demonstrating Knowledge of Clients
190(1)
Component 1c: Developing Client Goals
190(1)
Component 1d: Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources
191(1)
Component 1e: Developing an Organized and Effective Training Program
191(1)
Component 1f: Assessing Client Progress
191(1)
Domain 2: The Training Environment
191(1)
Component 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport
191(1)
Component 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning and Desire for Success
191(1)
Component 2c: Managing the Training Session
192(1)
Component 2d: Managing Client Responsiveness
192(1)
Component 2e: Planning Safe and Efficient Use of Physical Space
192(1)
Domain 3: Instruction/Training
192(1)
Component 3a: Communicating Clearly and Accurately
192(1)
Component 3b: Continually Checking for Understanding
192(1)
Component 3c: Engaging Clients in Learning and Exercising
193(1)
Concept 3d: Providing Feedback to Clients
193(1)
Component 3e: Demonstrating Ability to Adapt to Changing Needs of the Client
193(1)
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities
193(1)
Component 4a: Reflecting on Training
193(1)
Component 4b: Maintaining Accurate Records
193(1)
Component 4c: Communicating with the Client
193(1)
Component 4d: Contributing to the Organization and Community
193(1)
Component 4e: Growing and Developing Professionally
194(1)
Component 4f: Demonstrating Professionalism
194(1)
Reflection on Level of Performance
194(1)
Personal Attributes of Effective Teachers/Personal Trainers
194(1)
Emotional Intelligence and the Personal Trainer
195(1)
Goleman's Four Cluster Emotional Competency Model
196(1)
Reflective Teaching/Training
196(1)
Learning Theories
196(6)
Motivation Theory
196(2)
Attribution Theory
198(2)
Transfer Theory
200(1)
Retention Theory
201(1)
Goal Theory
202(1)
Curriculum and Instructional Design
202(1)
Elements of Lesson Design
203(1)
Principles of Effective Instruction/Training
203(1)
Learning Styles
203(2)
Internet Learning Style Inventories
204(1)
Gardner's Multiple Intelligences
204(1)
Brain Research and the Personal Training Client
205(3)
The Brain and How It Learns
205(1)
About the Brain
205(1)
The Grass Theory
206(1)
Primacy--Recency Theory
206(1)
Mood and Learning
207(1)
Exercise Psychology, Motivation, and Behavior Change
208(30)
Margaret Moore
Frank Claps
Gabrielle R. Highstein
Kate Larsen
Lisa Todd Graddy
Theresa J. Lavin
Personal Trainer's Role in Facilitating Client Change
209(1)
Personal Trainers Help Clients Change
209(1)
Clients Decide to Change
209(1)
The Personal Trainer--Client Relationship Is a Partnership
209(1)
Accountability
209(1)
Theories of Behavior Change
210(6)
Identifying Stages of Readiness to Change
210(1)
What Stage Is My Client in Today?
211(1)
Specific Behaviors and Stages of Change
211(1)
Strategies of Behavior Change
211(1)
Decisional Balance (Weighing the Pros and Cons)
212(1)
Self-Efficacy (Confidence in Challenging Situations)
212(1)
Cognitive (Thinking) or Affective (Feeling) Processes That Support Change
213(2)
Behavioral Processes That Support Change
215(1)
Applying the Theories of Behavior Change
216(1)
Building a Personal Trainer--Client Relationship That Facilitates Change
216(6)
Getting Started
216(2)
Establish Your Credibility
218(1)
Confidentiality
218(1)
Trust
219(1)
Being on Time
219(1)
Meet Commitments
219(1)
Accept Clients As They Are
219(1)
Complete Focus
219(1)
Use Self-Disclosure Only When It Helps Your Client
219(1)
Active Listening
220(1)
Reflective Statements
220(1)
Listen for Facts And Feelings
220(1)
Ask Open-Ended Questions (Inquiry)
220(1)
Show Interest in Your Client's Life
220(1)
Holding Up the Mirror
221(1)
Provide and Encourage Open, Honest Feedback
221(1)
Client Participation in Planning and Decisions
221(1)
Fitness Visions and Intrinsic Motivators
222(3)
Help Your Client Create a Personal Fitness Vision
222(1)
Visualization
223(1)
Finding Your Client's Most Powerful Intrinsic Motivators
223(2)
Behavioral Goal Setting
225(3)
Why We Help Clients Set Behavioral Goals
225(1)
The Power of Accountability and Goals
225(1)
How to Set Smart Goals
226(1)
Setting Three-Month Behavioral Goals
226(1)
Setting Weekly Behavioral Goals
227(1)
Tracking and Measuring Progress
227(1)
Subjective Self-Reporting
227(1)
Assessment of Goal Achievement
228(1)
Overcoming Obstacles
228(10)
Recognize and Welcome Obstacles
228(1)
Obstacles Are Learning Opportunities
228(1)
Ambivalence and Backsliding
229(1)
Problem Solving
229(1)
Offer a Solution to Every Problem Your Client Presents
230(1)
Be Firm When Appropriate
230(1)
Help Your Client Find a Support System
230(1)
Focus Mainly on the Present and Future
231(1)
Help Your Clients Find Solutions to Obstacles Embedded in Their Lives
231(1)
Identify Triggers
231(1)
Remind Your Client of Prior Progress
232(1)
Negative Self-Talk
232(1)
Self-Sabotage
232(1)
Stay Positive and Avoid Being Judgmental
233(1)
Time Management
233(1)
Stress Management
233(1)
Make the Training Program Interesting
234(1)
Welcome Feedback
234(4)
Nutrition
238(27)
Dan Benardot
Walter R. Thompson
Scope of Practice
239(1)
Essential Nutrition Concepts
240(1)
Nutrients
240(1)
Nutrients That Provide Energy
240(10)
Meeting Energy Needs for Optimal Weight and Body Composition
241(1)
Carbohydrate
242(2)
The Glycemic Index
244(1)
Protein
245(3)
Fat
248(2)
Vitamins and Minerals
250(5)
Water-Soluble Vitamins
250(5)
Fat-Soluble Vitamins
255(1)
Minerals
255(1)
Fluid and Hydration
255(2)
Meeting Fluid Needs
255(1)
Fluid Consumption Guidelines
256(1)
Water versus Sports Drinks
256(1)
Dietary Supplements and Ergogenic Aids
257(2)
Practical Considerations
259(3)
One Day before a Competition
259(1)
Immediately before Exercise or Competition
259(1)
During Exercise or Competition
260(1)
After Exercise or Competition
260(1)
Eating on the Road
260(2)
Answers to Frequently Asked Nutrition Questions
262(3)
Should I Take Protein Supplements?
262(1)
Should I Consume Sports Drinks or Does Water Work Just As Well?
262(1)
Should I Stay Away from Caffeinated Beverages before a Workout?
262(1)
Should I Skip Lunch if I'm Trying to Lower My Body Fat Level?
262(1)
Will a High-Protein, Low-Carbohydrate Diet Help Me Lose Weight?
263(1)
Should I Eat or Drink Anything during Exercise?
263(1)
I'm a Profuse Sweater and Occasionally Get Serious Cramps. Is There Anything I Should Be Doing to Avoid This Problem?
263(1)
How Can I Tell if I'm Dehydrated?
263(2)
PART IV: INITIAL CLIENT CONSULTATION, GOALS/OBJECTIVES, SCREENING, AND ASSESSMENTS
The Initial Client Consultation
265(21)
Kenneth E. Baldwin
The Initial Client Contact
267(6)
Prepare for Personal Training Clients: Determine a Schedule
267(1)
Demographics of Your Potential Clients
268(1)
Meeting Potential Clients
268(1)
The Potential Client Screening and the Potential Client Intake Form
269(4)
Building a Client-Personal Trainer Relationship
273(7)
The Initial Client Consultation
273(1)
A Client-Focused Approach
273(2)
Review the Content and Sequence of the Initial Client Consultation
275(1)
Presenting the Client Welcome Packet
275(4)
Organizing the Client Welcome Packet
279(1)
Summarize the Initial Client Consultation
280(1)
The Art of Communication and Presenting Your Services
280(6)
Effective Communication Skills
280(1)
The Importance of Energy and Listening
280(1)
A Proactive Approach to Listening
281(1)
Sending Positive Messages through Nonverbal Communications
281(1)
Learning to Ask Questions
282(1)
Selling and Recommending the Right Personal Training Package
282(1)
Selling Personal Training Services
283(1)
Obtaining Client Commitment
283(1)
Customer Service and Professionalism
284(1)
Value the Customer
284(2)
Client and Personal Trainer Goals and Objectives
286(11)
Tarra Hodge
Goals and Objectives: The Difference and the Importance
287(1)
Client Psychology and Behavioral Change
288(1)
Motivational Feedback
289(1)
Understanding the Role of Reinforcement in the Goals-Setting Process
290(1)
Client's Initial Goals and Objectives: Short- and Long-Term
290(1)
How to Help Clients Formulate Realistic Goals and Objectives
291(1)
Needs Assessment, Goals, and KSAs of the Personal Trainer
292(2)
Setting and Recording Client Goals and Objectives
292(1)
Evaluating Client Goals and Objectives
293(1)
Personal Trainer's Initial Goals and Objectives
293(1)
Communication, Feedback, and Client Evaluation/Assessment
294(1)
12 Steps to Effectively Planning Your Client's Program
295(2)
Screening and Risk Stratification
297(17)
Cody Sipe
Why Screen?
298(1)
Purposes of Screening
298(1)
The Screening Process
298(12)
Risk Stratification
299(1)
Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors
300(9)
Exercise Testing and Testing Supervision Recommendations
309(1)
Health History Evaluation
310(1)
Documentation
310(1)
Medical Clearance and Referral
310(4)
Obtaining Medical Clearance
310(1)
When to Refer?
311(1)
Communicating with Healthcare Providers
312(1)
Informed Consent
313(1)
Client Health-Related Physical Fitness Assessments
314(42)
Gregory B. Dwyer
Shala E. Davis
Kenneth E. Baldwin
Assessments to Meet Client Needs
315(1)
Selection and Sequence of Assessments
315(1)
Heart Rate: Resting, Exercise, and Recovery
316(1)
Measurement of Heart Rate
316(1)
Blood Pressure: Resting and Exercise
317(5)
Measurement of Blood Pressure
317(3)
Procedures for Resting Blood Pressure Measurement
320(2)
Body Composition
322(6)
Height and Weight
323(1)
Body Mass Index (BMI)
323(1)
Waist-to-Hip Ratio (WHR)
323(2)
Waist Circumference Alone
325(1)
Skinfolds
325(3)
Cardiorespiratory Assessment
328(4)
Pretest Considerations
329(1)
Field Tests for Prediction of Cardiorespiratory Fitness
329(1)
Walk/Run Performance Tests
330(1)
Step Tests
331(1)
Norms for CRF (VO2max)
332(1)
Flexibility Assessment
332(2)
Postural Analysis and Body Alignment Assessments
334(5)
Postural Improvement Takes Time
334(1)
The Center of Gravity and Base of Support
334(1)
Line of Gravity
334(1)
Static and Dynamic Posture
335(1)
Posture-Related Injuries and Health Concerns
335(1)
Equipment Needs for Posture Assessment
335(1)
The Posture Screening and Assessment Process
335(1)
Analysis of Posture
336(3)
Correction of Posture and Body Alignment
339(1)
Exercise Program Design and New Skills Application
339(1)
Goniometry and Joint Range-of-Motion Assessments
339(17)
Client Involvement in the Range-of-Motion Assessment
339(1)
The Goniometry/Range-of-Motion Assessment
340(1)
Range of Motion (ROM)
340(1)
The Goniometer
341(2)
ROM and Postural Alignment Assessments
343(9)
Goniometry and Its Usefulness As an Assessment Tool
352(1)
Assessments As a Motivational Device
353(3)
PART V: DEVELOPING YOUR CLIENT'S EXERCISE PROGRAM
Client Exercise Program Design
356(16)
Nikki Carosone
Overview of Anatomy and Physiology
357(4)
Musculoskeletal System
357(3)
Cardiovascular System
360(1)
Respiratory System
360(1)
Types of Training
361(8)
Resistance Training
361(4)
Cardiovascular Training
365(2)
Flexibility Training
367(2)
Plyometrics and Sports Performance
369(1)
Balance and Stability
369(1)
Functional Training
369(1)
Program Design
370(2)
Anatomy of an Exercise Session
370(1)
Exercise Selection
371(1)
Resistance Training Programs
372(32)
William J. Kraemer
Jakob L. Vingren
Disa L. Hatfield
Barry A. Spiering
Maren S. Fragala
The Science behind Resistance Training
373(1)
General Resistance Training Principles
374(1)
Program Design Process
374(5)
Training Potential
375(1)
Initial Assessments
375(1)
Follow-Up Assessments
375(1)
Individualization
376(1)
Client Feedback
376(1)
Setting and Evaluating Goals
377(1)
Maintenance of Training Goals
378(1)
Unrealistic Goals
378(1)
Resistance Training Modalities
379(3)
Variable-Resistance Devices
379(1)
Dynamic Constant External Resistance Devices
380(1)
Static Resistance Devices
381(1)
Other Resistance Devices
381(1)
Machines versus Free-Weight Exercises
382(1)
The Needs Analysis
382(2)
Biomechanical Analysis to Determine What Muscles Need to be Trained
383(1)
Determining the Energy Sources Used in the Activity
384(1)
Selecting a Resistance Modality
384(1)
Injury Prevention Exercises
384(1)
The Acute Program Variables
384(5)
Choice of Exercises
384(1)
Order of Exercises
385(1)
Resistance and Repetitions Used
386(1)
Number of Sets for Each Exercise
387(1)
Duration of Rest Period between Sets and Exercises
388(1)
Variation of the Acute Program Variables
389(1)
Muscle Actions
389(1)
True Repetition and Range of Movement
390(1)
Periodization of Exercise
390(4)
Linear Periodization
391(1)
Non-Linear Periodized Programs
392(2)
Progression from Beginner to Advanced
394(1)
Clients
394(1)
Client Interactions
394(1)
Spotting in Resistance Exercise
395(1)
Know Proper Spotting Technique
395(1)
Resistance Exercises
396(8)
Cardiorespiratory Training Programs
404(27)
Barbara Bushman
Kenneth E. Baldwin
General Training Principles
405(3)
Design of the Cardiovascular Training Program
408(17)
Warm-Up
408(1)
Endurance Phase
408(17)
Cool-Down
425(1)
Sample Cardiovascular Training Programs
425(5)
Fitness Progression for Beginners
426(1)
Fitness Gains and Weight Loss
426(4)
Implementation of Cardiovascular Training Programs
430(1)
Guidelines for Designing Flexibility Programs
431(22)
Christopher Berger
Jan Schroeder
Determinants of Flexibility
432(2)
Age
433(1)
Gender
433(1)
Physical Activity History
434(1)
Benefits and Risks of Flexibility Training
434(1)
Benefits
434(1)
Risks
435(1)
Evaluating Flexibility
435(1)
Three Types of Stretching
436(2)
Static
436(1)
Dynamic
437(1)
Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation
438(1)
Rationale for Flexibility Training
438(1)
General Guidelines to Consider When Designing a Flexibility Training Program
438(1)
Warm-Up
438(1)
Breathing
438(1)
Posture
439(1)
Precautions for Individuals with Health Concerns
439(1)
Arthritis
439(1)
Muscular Imbalance
439(1)
Osteoporosis
440(1)
Hip Fracture/Replacement
440(1)
Flexibility Program Development
440(13)
Frequency
440(1)
Intensity
440(1)
Duration
440(10)
Mode
450(3)
Sequencing the Personal Training Program
453(19)
Neal I. Pire
Michael Rankin
Optimal Client Care and Customer Service
454(1)
Effective Professional Daily Habits
455(2)
Client Safety
455(1)
Planning Each Workout
456(1)
Proper Charting
456(1)
Professional Conduct in the Training Facility
456(1)
Facility Cleanliness
456(1)
Proper Exercise Protocols
457(1)
Daily Personal Trainer Improvement
457(1)
Personal Training Session Criteria
457(4)
Greeting
457(1)
Warm-Up Phase
458(1)
Progression
458(1)
Continuity
458(1)
Cool-Down Phase
459(1)
Flexibility
459(1)
Monitoring Metabolic and Perceived Exertion
459(1)
Exercise Selection
459(1)
Spotting: Hands-On Interaction
460(1)
Equipment Use/Replacement
460(1)
Charting
460(1)
Adherence to Fitness Program Specifics
461(1)
Attentiveness
461(1)
Innovation and Problem-Solving Skills
461(1)
Education and Motivation
461(3)
The Phases of a Personal Training Session
464(5)
Preparation Phase
465(1)
Transitional Phase
466(2)
The Workout
468(1)
The Review
468(1)
Training Notes
469(3)
PART VI: BUSINESS PRINCIPLES FOR PERSONAL TRAINERS
Business Basics and Planning
472(14)
Joan Hatfield
Neal I. Pire
The Personal Trainer's Position
473(1)
Business Success
473(2)
Managing a Personal Training Department
474(1)
Hiring Personal Trainers
474(1)
Setting Training Standards
474(1)
Training and Empowering Personal Trainers
475(1)
Fitness Management
475(1)
Starting a Business
476(1)
Sole Proprietorship
476(1)
Independent Contractor
476(1)
Partnership
476(1)
Corporation
476(1)
S Corporation
477(1)
Administration
477(6)
Establishing a Budget
477(1)
Management and Policies
477(1)
Marketing
478(2)
Sales
480(3)
Pricing
483(1)
Business Planning
483(1)
Professional Standards
483(3)
Legal Issues and Responsibilities
486(13)
Shirley Archer
Potential Areas of Professional Liability
487(9)
Safe Premises
487(2)
Equipment Use
489(2)
Scope of Practice
491(1)
Sexual Harassment
492(1)
Proper Qualifications
493(1)
Emergency Response
494(1)
Client Confidentiality
494(2)
Risk Management Strategies
496(3)
Written Policies, Procedures, and Forms
496(1)
Informed Consent, Release, or Waiver
496(1)
Professional Liability Insurance
497(2)
Appendix: American College of Sports Medicine Certifications 499(32)
Index 531


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