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Active Experiences for Active Children - Science,9780130834331

Active Experiences for Active Children - Science

by ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780130834331

ISBN10:
0130834335
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $37.33
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Summary

For courses in Early Childhood Science, Block Methods, and Early Childhood Teachers of Science. This practical book guides teachers of three-to five-year olds in planning and in implementing meaningful science skills and experiences. Using the most up-to-date research, the authors provide an excellent balance of theory and practice that are tied to the Benchmarks for Science Literacy, the National Science Education Standards, and NAEYC guidelines for developmentally appropriate practice.

Table of Contents

PART ONE Theory of Active Experiences 1(46)
Experiences and Science in Early Childhood: Theory into Practice
3(6)
Cognitive Theories: The Basis of Science Education for Young Children
5(1)
How Concepts Build
6(1)
Teaching Strategies for Science Learning
6(1)
Summary
7(2)
Active Children---Active Indoor Environments
9(12)
The Essentials: Health, Safety, Inclusion, and Beauty
10(2)
Health and Safety
10(1)
Planning for Inclusion
11(1)
Beauty
12(1)
Indoor Spaces
12(6)
Integrating Spaces
12(1)
Science Areas
13(1)
Art Centers
14(1)
Woodworking Center
15(1)
Book and Library Centers
15(1)
Sociodramatic Play Areas
16(1)
Areas for Manipulatives
17(1)
Block Areas
17(1)
Water and Sand Areas
17(1)
Music Areas
17(1)
Computer Stations
18(1)
Quiet Spaces
18(1)
The Teacher's Role
18(1)
Summary
19(2)
Active Children---Active Outdoor Environments
21(8)
Why Plan for Outdoor Environments?
22(1)
Space Planning
23(2)
Science and Nature Discovery Areas
23(1)
Art Activities
24(1)
Math Activities
24(1)
Physical Activities
25(1)
Other Considerations
25(1)
The Teacher's Role
25(2)
Summary
27(2)
Building Connections to Home and Community Through Active Experiences
29(10)
Out into the School
31(1)
Inside the School Building
32(1)
Outside in the Natural Environment
32(1)
Out into the Neighborhood and Community
32(1)
Basic Guidelines for Meaningful Field Experiences
33(2)
Building Connections with the Neighborhood and Community
35(1)
Natural Resources
35(1)
Visitors
35(1)
Zoos
35(1)
Science Centers and Museums
36(1)
The Home-School Connection
36(2)
Summary
38(1)
Experiences and Science Content
39(8)
Knowledge of Children
40(1)
Knowledge of the Subject Matter--Science
41(1)
Organizing Children's Experiences
42(1)
Bringing Knowledge of Children and Content Together
43(1)
Expanding and Extending Firsthand Experiences
44(1)
Summary
45(2)
PART TWO Guides to Active Experiences 47(98)
Living Things Grow and Change: Seeds and Plants
49(16)
For the Teacher
50(3)
What You'll Need to Know
50(1)
Key Concepts
50(1)
Goals and Objectives
50(1)
What You'll Need
50(2)
The Home-School Connection
52(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
52(1)
For the Children
53(12)
Using Process Skills with Seeds
53(1)
Using Process Skills with Seeds and Plants
53(1)
Using Children's Books to Motivate Active Experiences with Seeds and Plants
54(1)
Using Arts and Crafts to Document Active Experiences with Seeds and Plants
55(1)
Reflecting
55(1)
Extending and Expanding to the Early Primary Grades
55(2)
Documenting Children's Learning
57(8)
Living Things Grow and Change: Insects and Small Animals
65(14)
For the Teacher
66(3)
What You'll Need to Know
66(1)
Key Concepts
66(1)
Goals and Objectives
66(1)
What You'll Need
67(1)
The Home-School Connection
68(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
69(1)
For the Children
69(10)
Observing Small Animals: Insects
69(1)
Environments and Life Cycles
70(1)
Nests
70(1)
Recognizing Children's Books in Which Animals Are Depicted with Human Attributes and Feelings
71(1)
Classroom Pets or Not
71(1)
Reflecting
72(1)
Extending and Expanding to the Early Primary Grades
72(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
73(6)
I Am a Scientist
79(8)
For the Teacher
80(2)
What You'll Need to Know
80(1)
Key Concepts
80(1)
Goals and Objectives
80(1)
What You'll Need
80(1)
The Home-School Connection
81(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
82(1)
For the Children
82(5)
Learning to Observe
82(1)
Learning to Question
83(1)
Planning and Conducting Investigations
84(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
85(2)
How Toys Work
87(8)
For the Teacher
88(1)
What You'll Need to Know
88(1)
Key Concepts
88(1)
Goals and Objectives
88(1)
What You'll Need
88(1)
The Home-School Connection
89(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
89(1)
For the Children
89(6)
Sources of Energy
89(3)
Vibrations
92(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
92(3)
The Earth: Water
95(12)
For the Teacher
96(3)
What You'll Need to Know
96(1)
Key Concepts
96(1)
Goals and Objectives
96(1)
What You'll Need
97(1)
The Home-School Connection
98(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
99(1)
For the Children
99(8)
Indoor and Outdoor Activities
99(2)
Reflecting
101(1)
Extending and Expanding to the Early Primary Grades
101(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
102(5)
The Earth: Rocks and Minerals
107(12)
For the Teacher
108(3)
What You'll Need to Know
108(1)
Key Concepts
108(1)
Goals and Objectives
108(1)
What You'll Need
109(1)
The Home-School Connection
110(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
111(1)
For the Children
111(8)
Indoor and Outdoor Activities
111(2)
Reflecting
113(1)
Extending and Expanding to the Early Primary Grades
113(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
114(5)
The Human Body: The Senses
119(14)
For the Teacher
120(3)
What You'll Need to Know
120(1)
Key Concepts
120(1)
Goals and Objectives
120(1)
What You'll Need
120(2)
The Home-School Connection
122(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
122(1)
For the Children
123(10)
Sound
123(1)
Smell
124(1)
Touch
125(1)
Taste
126(1)
Sight
126(1)
Reflecting
127(1)
Extending and Expanding to the Early Primary Grades
127(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
128(5)
Healthy Bodies
133(12)
For the Teacher
134(4)
What You'll Need to Know
134(1)
Key Concepts
134(1)
Goals and Objectives
134(1)
What You'll Need
135(1)
The Home-School Connection
136(2)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
138(1)
For the Children
138(7)
Indoor and Outdoor Activities
138(2)
Reflecting
140(1)
Extending and Expanding to the Early Primary Grades
140(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
141(4)
References 145(3)
Resources 148(3)
Index 151

Excerpts

"What can I do tomorrow?" teachers ask. "I've run out of ideas. And I don't mean just another silly activity. I need something that will keep children involved and lead to successful learning." Grounded in John Dewey's philosophy that all genuine education comes through experience, but that not all experiences are equally educative,Active Experiences for Active Children: Scienceanswers teachers' questions about what to do tomorrow and on into the school year. Both pre- and in-service teachers will find this book useful. It is suitable as a text, or a supplemental text, for early childhood courses in community colleges and four-year college programs. The experiences in this book would provide a basis for a series of workshops or short courses in science for children. There are numerous activity books available. These, however, present isolated science activities that are often meaningless to children and void of any real content or learning.Active Experiences for Active Children: Scienceoffers teachers an integrated approach to planning science learning for young children. Its practicality will also be ideal for teachers who desire the best for young children but have limited training or formal preparation for teaching science. Professionals working in childcare, Head Start, or other early childhood settings will find thatActive Experiences for Active Children: Sciencesupports their growth and understanding of how to put theory into practice. ORGANIZATION This book is the third in a series of books designed to illustrate how to plan and implement meaningful, thematic experiences that truly educate young children instead of just keeping them busy. Teachers are given guides to planning and implementing curriculum that will lead to children's academic success using developmentally appropriate methods for teaching science. Active Experiences for Active Children: Scienceconsists of clear, concise, and usable guides for planning meaningful science content and teaching strategies for children in childcare, preschool, Head Start, or other early educational programs. Experiences are expanded into the early primary grades. The experiences in this book lead to successful science learning because they Are grounded in children's interests and needs in their here-and-now world. Have integrity in terms of content key to science learning. Involve children in group work, investigations, and projects. Have continuity. One experience builds on another, forming a complete, coherent, integrated learning curriculum for young children as well as connecting the early childhood setting to children's homes and communities. Provide time and opportunity for children to think and reflect on their experiences. Contain a large number of resources (books, Web sites, magazines, audios, and visuals) for both teachers and children. The first five chapters describe the foundation for planning and implementing experiential science learning. These offer pre- and in-service teachers of young children an overview of theory and research based upon Dewey, the constructivist view of children's learning, and the latest guidelines proposed for the science curriculum. The first chapter illustrates how theories of learning and teaching can be put into practice. This is followed by two chapters on indoor and outdoor environments for science. Next the book considers the importance of building home-school connections for science learning. Finally, chapter 5 reviews research and theory and discusses science content, methodology, and teaching strategies. Next, chapters based upon content suggested by the Benchmarks for Science Literacy and the National Science Education Standards are presented. There are eight experiences based upon the content, areas. These guides include sections for the teacher and for the children. The section


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