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Active Experiences for Active Children : Mathematics,9780130834348

Active Experiences for Active Children : Mathematics

by ;
ISBN13:

9780130834348

ISBN10:
0130834343
Format:
Spiral Bound
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $33.33
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Summary

Based on the theories of John Dewey, the constructivist view of children's learning, and current curriculum guidelines for mathematics, this latest book in the authors' Active Experiences series provides six clear, concise, and usable guides for turning mathematics instruction into activities that three-to-five year olds will find engaging. They involve group work, investigations, and projects; are grounded in children's interests and needs; and, build, one upon the other to form a coherent learning curriculum. Additionally, each conforms to the most recent standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). Review of children's literature illustrates the numerous ways to use child-appealing stories, poems, and pictures to teach mathematics. A full chapter on resources provides information for lesson planning and more, pre-screened for relevance to book-sanctioned activities. Thorough treatment of the home-school connection discusses the authors' views on collaboration between teachers and families. Coverage of ";setting up"; the mathematics area of a classroom-addresses both indoor and outdoor spaces, health/safety issues, organizing for inclusions, and making spaces visually appealing. Ideal for professionals in childcare, preschool, Head Start, and other early learning environments.

Author Biography

Carol Seefeldt is Professor Emeritus of human development at the Institute for Child Study, University of Maryland, College Park.

Table of Contents

PART ONE Theory of Active Experiences
1(48)
Experiences and Education: Putting Dewey's Theory Into Practice
3(10)
Deep Personal Meaning
4(3)
Firsthand Experiences
5(1)
Initiative, Choices, and Decision Making
5(1)
Age Appropriateness
6(1)
Content with Integrity and Meaning
7(1)
Involving Others
7(2)
Play
7(1)
Group Work and Projects
8(1)
Interactions with Teachers and Other Adults
9(1)
Covered with Language
9(1)
Continuity of Learning
9(1)
Time to Reflect
10(2)
Organization
11(1)
Evaluation
11(1)
Summary
12(1)
Active Children---Active Environments
13(16)
The Essentials: Health, Safety, Inclusion, and Beauty
15(3)
Health and Safety
15(1)
Planning for Inclusion
15(2)
Beauty
17(1)
Indoor Spaces
18(5)
Integrating Spaces
18(1)
Math or Manipulative Areas
18(1)
Science Areas
19(1)
Art Centers
19(1)
Woodworking Centers
20(1)
Book and Library Centers
20(1)
Sociodramatic Play Areas
21(1)
Block Areas
21(1)
Water and Sand Areas
22(1)
Music Areas
22(1)
Computer Stations
22(1)
Quiet Spaces
23(1)
Outdoor Spaces
23(2)
Math/Science and Nature Discovery Areas
23(1)
Art Spaces
24(1)
Math Spaces
24(1)
Physical Spaces
24(1)
Other Spaces
25(1)
The Teacher's Role
25(2)
Summary
27(2)
Building Connections to Home and Community Through Active Experiences
29(10)
Out into the School
31(1)
Inside the School Building
31(1)
Outside in the Natural Environment
31(1)
Out into the Neighborhood and Community
32(1)
Basic Guidelines for Meaningful Field Experiences
32(1)
Building Connections with the Neighborhood and Community
33(3)
The Neighborhood as a Mathematics Laboratory
34(1)
Other Neighborhood Resources
35(1)
The Home-School Connection
36(2)
Summary
38(1)
Experiences and Mathematical Content
39(10)
Knowledge of Children
40(2)
Sensorimotor (Birth--2)
40(1)
Preoperational (2--7/8)
41(1)
Knowledge of Subject Matter---Mathematics
42(1)
The Standards
43(1)
Bringing Knowledge of Children and Mathematics Together
44(1)
Expanding and Extending Firsthand Experiences
45(1)
Summary
46(3)
PART TWO Guides to Active Experiences
49(90)
Young Children Develop Ideas of Number and Counting
51(18)
For the Teacher
52(3)
What You'll Need to Know
52(1)
Key Concepts
52(1)
Goals and Objectives
53(1)
What You'll Need
53(1)
The Home-School Connection
54(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
54(1)
For the Children
55(10)
Children Will Develop the Disposition to Count and Use Mathematical Concepts in Their Everyday Lives
55(3)
Children Will Learn the Names of Numerals and to Write Them
58(2)
Children Will Learn to Count Sequentially
60(1)
Children Will Have Meaningful Opportunities to Count Using One-to-One Correspondence
61(1)
Children Will Begin to Use Number Operations in Connection with Their Daily Activities
62(1)
Reflecting
63(1)
Extending and Expanding to the Primary Grades
64(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
64(1)
Tear-Out Sheets
65(4)
Young Children Learn the Basic Concepts of Algebra
69(16)
For the Teacher
70(5)
What You'll Need to Know
70(1)
Key Concepts
71(1)
Goals and Objectives
71(1)
What You'll Need
71(3)
The Home-School Connection
74(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
74(1)
For the Children
75(5)
The Search for Patterns and Relationships
75(1)
Sorting, Classifying and Ordering Objects by Size, Number, and Other Properties
76(1)
Addition and Subtraction of Whole Numbers, Using Objects, Pictures, and Symbols
77(1)
Reflecting
78(1)
Extending and Expanding to the Primary Grades
78(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
79(1)
Tear-Out Sheets
80(5)
Young Children Learn the Basic Concepts of Geometry
85(14)
For the Teacher
86(4)
What You'll Need to Know
86(1)
Key Concepts
86(1)
Goals and Objectives
86(1)
What You'll Need
87(2)
The Home-School Connection
89(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
89(1)
For the Children
90(5)
Doing Geometry
90(2)
Reflecting
92(1)
Extending and Expanding to the Primary Grades
93(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
94(1)
Tear-Out Sheets
95(4)
Young Children Learn the Basic Concepts of Measurement
99(16)
For the Teacher
100(5)
What You'll Need to Know
100(1)
Key Concepts
100(1)
Goals and Objectives
101(1)
What You'll Need
102(1)
The Home-School Connection
103(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
104(1)
For the Children
105(5)
Measuring
105(3)
Extending and Expanding to the Primary Grades
108(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
109(1)
Tear-Out Sheets
110(5)
Data Description, Organization, Representation, and Analysis
115(12)
For the Teacher
116(3)
What You'll Need to Know
116(1)
Key Concepts
116(1)
Goals and Objectives
116(1)
What You'll Need
117(1)
The Home-School Connection
117(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
118(1)
For the Children
119(8)
Children Will Collect, Organize, and Sort Data
119(1)
Children Will Begin to Label Information and Develop an Understanding of Scale
120(1)
Children Will Organize Data Through Graphs, Tables, Lists, and So On
121(4)
Children Will Gain Meaning from Graphs, Tables, Lists, and So On
125(1)
Reflecting
126(1)
Extending and Expanding to the Primary Grades
126(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
126(1)
Math Problem Solving
127(12)
For the Teacher
128(2)
What You'll Need to Know
128(1)
Key Concepts
128(1)
Goals and Objectives
129(1)
What You'll Need
129(1)
The Home-School Connection
129(1)
Evaluating and Assessing Children's Learning
130(1)
For the Children
130(7)
Project Work
130(1)
Children Will Gain Skills in Asking Mathematical Questions
131(1)
Children Will Gain Skills in Predicting Mathematical Outcomes
132(1)
Children Will Gain Skills in Observing
133(1)
Children Will Gain Skills in Comparing and Contrasting
134(1)
Children Will Gain Skills in Reflecting
135(1)
Children Will Reach Conclusions
136(1)
Extending and Expanding to the Primary Grades
136(1)
Documenting Children's Learning
136(1)
Tear-Out Sheets
137(2)
References 139(4)
Resources 143(4)
Index 147


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