CART

(0) items

Africa and the West : A Documentary History from the Slave Trade to Independence,9781573562478
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Africa and the West : A Documentary History from the Slave Trade to Independence

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9781573562478

ISBN10:
1573562475
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
GREENWOOD PUBLISHING GROUP
List Price: $125.00
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $28.86
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Africa and the West: A Documentary History Volume 1: From the Slave Trade to Conquest, 1441-1905
    Africa and the West: A Documentary History Volume 1: From the Slave Trade to Conquest, 1441-1905
  • Africa and the West: A Documentary History Volume 2: From Colonialism to Independence, 1875 to the Present
    Africa and the West: A Documentary History Volume 2: From Colonialism to Independence, 1875 to the Present




Summary

Primary source documents are valuable learning resources preferred by many teachers because they give student the chance to decipher and interpret the history themselves. Africa and the West presents a range of hard-to-find primary source documents on Africa from the slave trade that started in the early part of the fifteenth century to independence and the problems of the post-colonial period.

Author Biography

WILLIAM H. WORGER is Professor of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. Trained in African history at the University of Auckland (New Zealand) and at Yale University, he is the author of South Africa's City of Diamonds.NANCY L. CLARK is Professor of History at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, where she also directs the University's honors program.EDWARD A. ALPERS is a Professor of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Alpers is former dean of honors and undergraduate programs at UCLA, as well as former president of the African Studies Association, the largest international scholarly organization devoted to the study of Africa.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
vi
List of Maps
vi
Preface vii
Part 1: Africa in the Era of the Slave Trade 1(108)
Introduction
3(2)
The beginnings of a regular European trade in slaves from Africa
5(8)
The Pope grants to the Portuguese a monopoly of trade with Africa
13(3)
The King of Spain regulates the importation of African slaves into the Americas
16(1)
British attempts to break the Portuguese and Spanish monopolies of slave trading
17(2)
A Jesuit justifies the trade in African slaves to a skeptical colleague
19(1)
The importation of slaves into the Cape of Good Hope
20(1)
An attempt to create an English monopoly of trade in West Africa
21(1)
Sources of slaves for the Royal African Company
22(1)
The log of the Arthur, a ship carrying slaves for the Royal African Company from West Africa to Barbados
23(4)
The Council of the Indies answers questions from the King of Spain concerning the introduction of slaves into Spanish America
27(2)
The voyage of the Hannibal, carrying slaves from West Africa to Barbados
29(6)
Willem Bosman describes the Dutch trade for slaves on the West African Coast
35(2)
In support of slavery and against monopoly
37(2)
Venture Smith describes his capture into slavery
39(3)
Olaudah Equiano becomes a slave
42(8)
Anders Sparrman describes the treatment of slaves in South Africa
50(4)
Alexander Falconbridge describes his experiences as a physician on slave ships
54(10)
The plan of the slave ship Brookes
64(1)
In support of the continued importation of slaves into South Africa
65(2)
Mungo Park describes taking slaves from the interior of Africa to the coast
67(10)
Britain and the United States enact legislation to abolish the trade in slaves
77(4)
Ali Eisami recounts how he was taken into slavery and then freed
81(4)
Samuel Crowther escapes slavery
85(6)
The Asante king questions British motives in ending the slave trade
91(2)
A slave revolt in South Africa
93(5)
A Muslim explains the morality and practices of slavery
98(5)
Tippu Tip, the ``leopard.''
103(2)
Chisi Ndjurisiye Sichyajunga, slave
105(4)
Part 2: From Abolition to Conquest 109(120)
Introduction
111(2)
The subordination of labor in South Africa
113(2)
The trade question in West Africa
115(3)
The King of Asante disputes the text of a treaty
118(4)
The impact of the abolitionists on labor legislation
122(1)
The settlers' revolt
123(2)
A missionary talks with a king
125(4)
Dingane kills the first settlers
129(1)
Advance by treaty in West Africa
130(2)
The secretary of state for the colonies proposes a more interventionist policy to end the slave trade
132(4)
Treaties with ``barbarians'' are different from those with ``civilized'' people
136(3)
The persistence of ``illegal'' slaving
139(10)
Samuel Crowther on the role of African missionaries
149(3)
Christianity and cattle killing
152(3)
Boer slaving
155(4)
Legislating race and religion
159(2)
Expanding trade by taking territory, Lagos 1861
161(2)
French ambitions in West Africa
163(4)
Africanus B. Horton on an autonomous Africa
167(5)
Diamonds
172(3)
Cecil Rhodes dreams of empire
175(4)
The sack of Kumasi
179(6)
Cetshwayo describes Zulu society
185(4)
A university for Africa
189(5)
The scramble for Africa begins
194(2)
The Berlin conference
196(2)
Rhodes reaches north
198(2)
The imperialism of chartered companies
200(1)
Voices of imperialism
201(17)
Voices of resistance
218(11)
Part 3: Colonialism and Its Critics 229(106)
Introduction
231(2)
Making colonialism appear ``traditional.''
233(3)
Africa for the African
236(3)
Evidence of colonial atrocities in the Belgian Congo
239(2)
Frederick Lugard instructs his officials on how to implement indirect rule
241(5)
The French practice direct rule to enforce submission
246(3)
A German school examination for African children
249(1)
The Natives Land Act, South Africa, 1913
250(3)
The ANC in South Africa
253(2)
W.E.B. Du Bois describes an Atlantic world bounded by racial exploitation
255(4)
An appeal for the equal treatment of Africans and people of African descent
259(1)
Harry Thuku explains why he formed a political movement for all East Africans
260(6)
Creating a national movement for all West Africans
266(2)
Organizing African workers
268(4)
Charlotte Maxeke describes the impact of colonialism on women and the family
272(3)
Education in the United States of America
275(2)
Colonial rule equals taxes and forced labor
277(4)
Colonial rule equals police harassment
281(4)
Colonial rule equals censorship
285(1)
The impact of World War II
286(6)
The dream of the warrior
292(2)
Freedom in our lifetime
294(2)
Women and men on strike
296(7)
Colonial officials take note of African discontent
303(1)
Hendrik Verwoerd explains apartheid
304(5)
Nelson Mandela's ``No Easy Walk to Freedom.''
309(7)
Jomo Kenyatta in court
316(3)
Mau Mau's daughter
319(4)
The Freedom Charter
323(2)
Freedom! Freedom! Freedom!
325(3)
Verwoerd reaffirms South Africa's commitment to white supremacy
328(3)
Patrice Lumumba writes his last letter to his wife
331(4)
Part 4: The Contradictions of Post-Colonial Independence 335(84)
Introduction
337(3)
Frantz Fanon discusses the limits of African independence
340(4)
Nkrumah on pan-Africanism as an answer to neo-colonialism
344(3)
Julius Nyerere argues for African democracy, self-reliance, and socialism
347(8)
The African National Congress (ANC) adopts a policy of violence
355(2)
``The Civilized Man's Burden.''
357(2)
Eduardo Mondlane rejects Portuguese apologetics
359(2)
Is neo-colonialism rationalized imperialism?
361(4)
A man of the people
365(3)
Tearing things apart
368(4)
Black consciousness
372(3)
An emperor and his court
375(4)
Who will start another fire?
379(1)
The fate of political dissisents
379(6)
The rebellion begins, South Africa, June 1976
385(3)
Torture under apartheid
388(3)
A task which shook my whole being
391(5)
Another coup in Ghana
396(2)
The crisis of the state in Africa
398(6)
The elements of democracy in Africa
404(3)
Negotiating democracy in South Africa
407(2)
Scrubbing the furious walls of Mikuyu prison
409(1)
An intimate genocide
410(4)
Nelson Mandela and a new Africa
414(5)
Index 419


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...