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African American Odyssey, The: Combined Edition

by ; ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780131922174

ISBN10:
0131922173
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $113.00

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Summary

This 3 rd edition ofThe African-American Odysseyincludes not only a CD-ROM-bound into every book (which incorporates over 150 documents in African American history), but also has a broadened international perspective, expanded coverage of interaction among African Americans and other ethnic groups, and new material on African Americans in the western portion of the United States. Free access to Research Navigator is included. This allows readers to access this powerful research tool with one site. Written by leading scholars,The African-American Odysseyis a clear and comprehensive narrative of African-American history, from its African roots through the Civil War through modern times. This book places African-American history in the context and at the center of American History.Balancing accounts of the actions of African-American leaders with investigations of the lives of the ordinary men and women in black communities, exciting and readable coverage includes: African-American history from its African origins to the sixteenth century and the beginning of the forced migration of millions of Africans to the Americas. Succeeding chapters present the struggle of black people to maintain their humanity during the slave trade and as slaves in North America during the long colonial period. It continues through the Civil War and the beginning of Reconstruction, and continues through the Civil Rights movement to discussions of black life at the dawn of the 21 st century.This is a compelling story of survival, struggle, and triumph over adversity. Readers will learn an appreciation of the central place of black people and black culture in this country, and a better understanding of both African-American and American history.

Table of Contents

Becoming African American
1(131)
Africa
2(24)
A Huge and Diverse Land
4(1)
The Birthplace of Humanity
4(2)
Ancient Civilizations and Old Arguments
6(4)
Egyptian Civilization
7(2)
Kush, Meroe, and Axum
9(1)
West Africa
10(2)
Ancient Ghana
10(1)
The Empire of Mali, 1230--1468
11(1)
Voices Al Bakri Describes Kumbi Saleh and Ghana's Royal Court
12(5)
The Empire of Songhai, 1464--1591
13(1)
The West African Forest Region
14(3)
Kongo and Angola
17(1)
Voices A Dutch Visitor Describes Benin City
18(1)
West African Society and Culture
18(1)
Families and Villages
18(1)
Profile Nzinga Mbemba of Kongo
19(7)
Women
20(1)
Class and Slavery
20(1)
Religion
21(1)
Art and Music
21(1)
Literature: Oral Histories, Poetry, and Tales
22(1)
Conclusion
23(1)
Recommended Reading
24(1)
Additional Bibliography
24(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
25(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
25(1)
Middle Passage
26(24)
The European Age of Exploration and Colonization
28(1)
The Slave Trade in Africa
29(1)
The Origins of the Atlantic Slave Trade
30(2)
Growth of the Atlantic Slave Trade
32(2)
The African-American Ordeal from Capture to Destination
34(3)
The Crossing
36(1)
The Slavers
36(1)
A Slave's Story
36(1)
Profile Olaudah Equiano
37(3)
A Captain's Story
38(1)
Provisions for the Middle Passage
39(1)
Sanitation, Disease, and Death
39(1)
Voices The Journal of a Dutch Slaver
40(1)
Profile Ayuba Sulieman Diallo
41(2)
Resistance and Revolt at Sea
42(1)
Cruelty
43(1)
African Women on Slave Ships
43(1)
Landing and Sale in the West Indies
43(1)
Seasoning
44(2)
The End of the Journey: Masters and Slaves in the Americas
46(1)
The Ending of the Atlantic Slave Trade
47(3)
Conclusion
48(1)
Recommended Reading
48(1)
Additional Bibliography
48(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
49(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
49(1)
Black People in Colonial North America, 1526--1763
50(28)
The Peoples of North America
53(3)
American Indians
53(1)
The Spanish Empire
54(1)
The British and Jamestown
54(1)
Africans Arrive in the Chesapeake
55(1)
Black Servitude in the Chesapeake
56(2)
Race and the Origins of Black Slavery
56(1)
The Emergence of Chattel Slavery
57(1)
Profile Anthony Johnson
58(1)
Bacon's Rebellion and American Slavery
59(1)
Plantation Slavery, 1700--1750
59(3)
Tobacco Colonies
59(1)
Low-Country Slavery
60(2)
Voices A Description of an Eighteenth-Century Virginia Plantation
62(1)
Slave Life in Early America
63(1)
Miscegenation and Creolization
63(1)
The Origins of African-American Culture
64(4)
The Great Awakening
65(2)
Language, Music, and Folk Literature
67(1)
The African-American Impact on Colonial Culture
67(1)
Slavery in the Northern Colonies
68(1)
Voices A Poem by Jupiter Hammon
68(1)
Slavery in Spanish Florida and French Louisiana
69(2)
African Americans in New Spain's Northern Borderlands
71(1)
Black Women in Colonial America
72(1)
Black Resistance and Rebellion
72(6)
Conclusion
74(1)
Recommended Reading
75(1)
Additional Bibliography
75(2)
Retracing the Odyssey
77(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
77(1)
Rising Expectations: African Americans and the Struggle for Independence, 1763--1783
78(24)
The Crisis of the British Empire
81(2)
Profile Crispus Attucks
83(1)
The Declaration of Independence and African Americans
84(2)
The Impact of the Enlightenment
84(1)
African Americans in the Revolutionary Debate
85(1)
Black Enlightenment
86(1)
Voices Boston's Slaves Link Their Freedom to American Liberty
86(2)
Phillis Wheatley
87(1)
Benjamin Banneker
87(1)
Voices Phillis Wheatley on Liberty and Natural Rights
88(1)
African Americans in the War for Independence
89(4)
Black Loyalists
89(2)
Black Patriots
91(2)
The Revolution and Emancipation
93(9)
The Revolutionary Impact
94(2)
The Revolutionary Promise
96(1)
Conclusion
97(1)
Recommended Reading
98(1)
Additional Bibliography
99(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
100(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
100(2)
African Americans in the New Nation, 1783--1820
102(30)
Forces for Freedom
105(3)
Northern Emancipation
105(2)
The Northwest Ordinance of 1787
107(1)
Profile Elizabeth Freeman
108(3)
Antislavery Societies in the North and the Upper South
109(1)
Manumission and Self-Purchase
109(1)
The Emergence of a Free Black Class in the South
110(1)
Forces for Slavery
111(3)
The U.S. Constitution
111(1)
Cotton
112(1)
The Louisiana Purchase and African Americans in the Lower Mississippi Valley
112(1)
Conservatism and Racism
113(1)
The Emergence of Free Black Communities
114(2)
The Origins of Independent Black Churches
115(1)
Voices Richard Allen on the Break with St. George's Church
116(2)
The First Black Schools
117(1)
Voices Absalom Jones Petitions Congress on Behalf of Fugitives Facing Reenslavement
118(1)
Black Leaders and Choices
119(1)
Migration
119(1)
Profile James Forten
120(3)
Slave Uprisings
121(1)
The White Southern Reaction
122(1)
The War of 1812
123(1)
The Missouri Compromise
124(6)
Conclusion
126(1)
Recommended Reading
126(1)
Additional Bibliography
127(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
128(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
128(2)
Visualizing the Past The Voyage to Slavery
130(2)
Slavery, Abolition, and the Quest for Freedom: The Coming of the Civil War, 1793--1861
132(124)
Life in the Cotton Kingdom
134(26)
The Expansion of Slavery
136(1)
Profile Solomon Northup
137(2)
Slave Population Growth
138(1)
Ownership of Slaves in the Old South
139(1)
Slave Labor in Agriculture
139(4)
Tobacco
140(1)
Rice
141(1)
Sugar
141(1)
Cotton
141(2)
Other Crops
143(1)
House Servants and Skilled Slaves
143(1)
Urban and Industrial Slavery
144(2)
Punishment
146(1)
The Domestic Slave Trade
147(1)
Profile William Ellison
147(1)
Voices Frederick Douglass on the Readiness of Masters to Use the Whip
148(1)
Slave Families
149(1)
Voices A Slaveholder Describes a New Purchase
150(4)
Children
150(1)
Sexual Exploitation
151(1)
Diet
152(1)
Clothing
153(1)
Health
153(1)
The Socialization of Slaves
154(1)
Religion
154(1)
The Character of Slavery and Slaves
155(5)
Conclusion
157(1)
Recommended Reading
157(1)
Additional Bibliography
158(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
159(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
159(1)
Free Black People in Antebellum America
160(28)
Demographics of Freedom
162(2)
The Jacksonian Era
164(1)
Limited Freedom in the North
165(4)
Black Laws
166(1)
Disfranchisement
167(1)
Segregation
168(1)
Black Communities in the Urban North
169(3)
The Black Family
170(1)
The Struggle for Employment
170(1)
The Northern Black Elite
171(1)
Voices Maria W. Stewart on the Condition of Black Workers
172(2)
Black Professionals
172(1)
Artists and Musicians
173(1)
Black Authors
174(1)
African-American Institutions
174(2)
Black Churches
175(1)
Profile Stephen Smith and William Whipper
176(2)
Schools
177(1)
Voices The Constitution of the Pittsburgh African Education Society
178(1)
Voluntary Associations
179(1)
Free African Americans in the Upper South
179(3)
Free African Americans in the Deep South
182(6)
Free African Americans in the Trans-Mississippi West
183(1)
Conclusion
184(1)
Recommended Reading
184(1)
Additional Bibliography
185(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
186(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
186(2)
Opposition to Slavery, 1800--1833
188(20)
A Country in Turmoil
190(4)
Political Paranoia
191(2)
The Second Great Awakening
193(1)
The Benevolent Empire
194(1)
Abolitionism Begins in America
194(5)
From Gabriel to Demark Vesey
195(2)
The American Colonization Society
197(1)
Black Nationalism and Colonization
197(1)
Black Opposition to Colonization
198(1)
Black Abolitionist Women
199(1)
Profile Maria Stewart
199(1)
Voices A Black Woman Speaks Out on the Right to Education
200(1)
The Baltimore Alliance
201(1)
David Walker's Appeal
201(1)
Voices William Watkins Opposes Colonization
202(1)
Nat Turner
202(1)
Profile David Walker
203(5)
Conclusion
204(1)
Recommended Reading
205(1)
Additional Bibliography
205(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
206(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
207(1)
Let Your Motto Be Resistance, 1833--1850
208(22)
A Rising Tide of Racism and Violence
210(2)
Antiblack and Anti-abolitionist Riots
211(1)
Texas and the War against Mexico
211(1)
The Response of the Antislavery Movement
212(1)
The American-Anti-Slavery Society
213(1)
Profile Henry Highland Garnet
213(3)
Black and Women's Antislavery Societies
215(1)
The Black Convention Movement
215(1)
Profile Sojourner Truth
216(1)
Black Community Institutions
216(2)
Black Churches in the Antislavery Cause
217(1)
Black Newspapers
217(1)
Moral Suasion
218(1)
Voices Frederick Douglass Describes an Awkward Situation
218(1)
The American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society and the Liberty Party
219(1)
A More Aggressive Abolitionism
220(3)
The Amistad and the Creole
220(1)
The Underground Railroad
221(1)
Canada West
222(1)
Black Militancy
223(1)
Voices Martin R. Delany Describes His Vision of a Black Nation
224(1)
Frederick Douglass
224(1)
Black Nationalism
225(5)
Conclusion
226(1)
Recommended Reading
226(1)
Additional Bibliography
227(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
228(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
228(2)
``And Black People Were at the Heart of It'': The United States Disunites over Slavery
230(26)
The Lure of the West
232(4)
Free Labor versus Slave Labor
233(1)
The Wilmot Proviso
233(1)
California and the Compromise of 1850
233(1)
Fugitive Slave Laws
234(2)
Voices African Americans Respond to the Fugitive Slave Law
236(1)
Fugitive Slaves
236(2)
William and Ellen Craft
237(1)
Shadrach
237(1)
The Battle at Christiana
237(1)
Profile Thomas Sims, a Fugitive Slave
238(1)
Anthony Burns
238(1)
Margaret Garner
239(1)
The Rochester Convention, 1853
239(1)
Nativism and the Know-Nothings
240(1)
Uncle Tom's Cabin
240(1)
The Kansas-Nebraska Act
241(1)
Preston Brooks Attacks Charles Sumner
241(2)
The Dred Scott Decision
243(2)
Questions for the Court
243(1)
Reaction to the Dred Scott Decision
244(1)
White Northerners and Black Americans
244(1)
The Lincoln-Douglas Debates
245(1)
Abraham Lincoln and Black People
245(1)
Profile Martin Delany
246(1)
John Brown and the Raid on Harpers Ferry
247(1)
Planning the Raid
247(1)
The Raid
247(1)
The Reaction
248(1)
The Election of Abraham Lincoln
248(1)
Black People Respond to Lincoln's Election
249(1)
Disunion
249(5)
Conclusion
250(1)
Recommended Reading
251(1)
Additional Bibliography
251(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
252(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
252(2)
Visualizing the Past Speaking Out Against Slavery
254(2)
The Civil War, Emancipation, and Black Reconstruction: The Second American Revolution
256(80)
Liberation: African Americans and the Civil War
258(30)
Lincoln's Aims
261(1)
Black Men Volunteer and Are Rejected
261(1)
Union Policies toward Confederate Slaves
261(4)
``Contraband''
262(1)
Lincoln's Initial Position
262(1)
Lincoln Moves Toward Emancipation
263(1)
Lincoln Delays Emancipation
263(1)
Black People Reject Colonization
264(1)
The Emancipation Proclamation
265(4)
Limits of the Proclamation
266(1)
Effects of the Proclamation on the South
267(2)
Profile Elizabeth Keckley
269(1)
Black Men Fight for the Union
269(5)
The First South Carolina Volunteers
270(1)
The Second South Carolina Volunteers
271(1)
The 54th Massachusetts Regiment
271(1)
Black Soldiers Confront Discrimination
271(2)
Black Men in Combat
273(1)
The Assault on Battery Wagner
273(1)
Voices Lewis Douglass Describes the Fighting at Battery Wagner
274(1)
Olustee
275(1)
The Crater
275(1)
The Confederate Reaction to Black Soldiers
275(2)
The Abuse and Murder of Black Troops
275(1)
The Fort Pillow Massacre
276(1)
Black Men in the Union Navy
277(1)
Liberators, Spies, and Guides
277(1)
Profile Harriet Tubman
278(1)
Violent Opposition to the Black People
279(1)
The New York City Draft Riot
279(1)
Union Troops and Slaves
279(1)
Refugees
279(1)
Black People and the Confederacy
280(8)
The Impressment of Black People
280(1)
Confederates Enslave Free Black People
280(1)
Black Confederates
281(1)
Personal Servants
281(1)
Black Men Fighting for the South
281(1)
Black Opposition to the Confederacy
282(1)
The Confederate Debate on Black Troops
282(2)
Conclusion
284(1)
Recommended Reading
284(1)
Additional Bibliography
285(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
286(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
286(2)
The Meaning of Freedom: The Promise of Reconstruction, 1865--1868
288(24)
The End of Slavery
290(2)
Differing Reactions of Former Slaves
291(1)
Reuniting Black Families
291(1)
Land
292(1)
Special Field Order #15
292(1)
The Port Royal Experiment
292(1)
The Freedmen's Bureau
293(1)
Voices A Freedmen's Bureau Commissioner Tells Freed People What Freedom Means
294(1)
Southern Homestead Act
294(1)
Sharecropping
295(1)
The Black Church
295(3)
Education
298(1)
Black Teachers
298(1)
Black Colleges
299(1)
Response of White Southerners
299(1)
Violence
299(1)
Voices A Northern Black Woman on Teaching Freedmen
300(1)
Profile Charlotte E. Ray
301(1)
The Crusade for Political and Civil Rights
302(1)
Presidential Reconstruction under Andrew Johnson
302(1)
Profile Aaron A. Bradley
303(1)
Black Codes
304(1)
Black Conventions
304(1)
The Radical Republicans
304(2)
Radical Proposals
305(1)
The Freedmen's Bureau Bill and the Civil Rights Bill
305(1)
Johnson's Vetoes
306(1)
The Fourteenth Amendment
306(1)
Radical Reconstruction
306(2)
Universal Manhood Suffrage
307(1)
Black Politics
307(1)
Sit-Ins and Strikes
307(1)
The Reaction of White Southerners
308(4)
Conclusion
308(1)
Recommended Reading
309(1)
Additional Bibliography
309(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
310(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
310(2)
The Meaning of Freedom: The Failure of Reconstruction
312(24)
Constitutional Conventions
314(2)
Elections
315(1)
Black Political Leaders
315(1)
The Issues
316(1)
Education and Social Welfare
316(1)
Civil Rights
317(1)
Economic Issues
317(1)
Profile The Gibbs Brothers
318(1)
Land
319(1)
Business and Industry
319(1)
Black Politicians: An Evaluation
319(1)
Republican Factionalism
319(1)
Profile The Rollin Sisters
320(1)
Opposition
321(1)
The Ku Klux Klan
321(2)
The West
323(1)
The Fifteenth Amendment
323(1)
Voices An Appeal For Help Against the Klan
324(1)
The Enforcement Acts
324(1)
The North Loses Interest
325(1)
Voices Black Leaders Support the Passage of a Civil Rights Act
326(1)
The Freemen's Bank
326(1)
The Civil Rights Act of 1875
327(1)
The End of Reconstruction
327(7)
Violent Redemption
328(1)
The Shotgun Policy
328(1)
The Hamburg Massacre
329(1)
The ``Compromise'' of 1877
330(1)
Conclusion
330(1)
Recommended Reading
331(1)
Additional Bibliography
332(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
333(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
333(1)
Visualizing the Past Higher Education for African Americans Begins
334(2)
Searching for Safe Spaces
336(122)
White Supremacy Triumphant: African Americans in the South in the Late Nineteenth Century
338(26)
Politics
341(3)
Black Congressmen
342(1)
Democrats and Farmer Discontent
342(1)
The Colored Farmers' Alliance
343(1)
The Populist Party
343(1)
Disfranchisement
344(2)
Evading the Fifteenth Amendment
345(1)
Mississippi
345(1)
South Carolina
345(1)
The Grandfather Clause
346(1)
Segregation
346(2)
Jim Crow
346(1)
Segregation on the Railroads
347(1)
Plessy v. Ferguson
347(1)
Voices Majority and Dissenting Opinions on Plessy v. Ferguson
348(1)
Streetcar Segregation
348(1)
Segregation Proliferates
349(1)
Racial Etiquette
349(1)
Violence
350(2)
Washington County, Texas
350(1)
The Phoenix Riot
350(1)
The Wilmington Riot
350(1)
The New Orleans Riot
350(1)
Lynching
351(1)
Rape
352(1)
Migration
352(1)
Profile Ida Wells Barnett
353(3)
The Liberian Exodus
354(1)
The Exodusters
354(1)
Migration within the South
355(1)
Black Farm Families
356(2)
Sharecroppers
356(1)
Renters
356(1)
Crop Liens
357(1)
Peonage
357(1)
Black Landowners
357(1)
White Resentment of Black Success
357(1)
Voices Cash and Debt for the Black Cotton Farmer
358(1)
African Americans and Southern Courts
358(1)
Segregated Justice
358(1)
Profile Johnson C. Whittaker
359(5)
The Convict Lease System
361(1)
Conclusion
361(1)
Recommended Reading
362(1)
Additional Bibliography
362(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
363(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
363(1)
Black Southerners Challenge White Supremacy
364(30)
Social Darwinism
366(1)
Education and Schools
367(3)
Segregated Schools
368(1)
The Hampton Model
368(1)
Washington and the Tuskegee Model
369(1)
Voices Thomas E. Miller and the Mission of the Black Land-Grant College
370(1)
Critics of the Tuskegee Model
370(1)
Church and Religion
371(3)
The Church as Solace and Escape
372(1)
The Holiness Movement and the Pentecostal Church
373(1)
Roman Catholics and Episcopalians
373(1)
Profile Henry McNeal Turner
374(1)
Red versus Black: The Buffalo Soldiers
375(3)
Discrimination in the Army
376(1)
The Buffalo Soldiers in Combat
376(1)
Civilian Hostility to Black Soldiers
377(1)
Brownsville
377(1)
African Americans in the Navy
378(1)
The Black Cowboys
378(1)
The Spanish-American War
378(2)
Voices Black Men in Battle in Cuba
380(1)
Black Officers
380(1)
A Splendid Little War
381(1)
After the War
381(1)
The Philippine Insurrection
381(1)
Would Black Men Fight Brown Men?
381(1)
Black Businesspeople and Entrepreneurs
382(1)
Profile Maggie Lena Walker
383(1)
African Americans and Labor
384(1)
Unions
384(1)
Strikes
384(1)
Black Professionals
385(2)
Medicine
385(1)
The Law
386(1)
Music
387(1)
Ragtime
387(1)
Jazz
387(1)
The Blues
388(1)
Sports
388(6)
Jack Johnson
388(1)
Baseball
389(1)
Basketball and Other Sports
389(1)
College Athletics
390(1)
Conclusion
390(1)
Recommended Reading
391(1)
Additional Bibliography
392(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
393(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
393(1)
Conciliation, Agitation, and Migration: African Americans in the Early Twentieth Century
394(36)
Race and the Progressive Movement
397(1)
Booker T. Washington's Approach
397(2)
Washington's Influence
398(1)
The Tuskegee Machine
398(1)
Opposition to Washington
399(1)
Voices W. E. B. Du Bois on Being Black in America
400(1)
W.E.B. Du Bois
400(2)
The Souls of Black Folk
401(1)
The Talented Tenth
401(1)
The Niagara Movement
402(1)
NAACP
402(2)
Using the System
403(1)
Du Bois and The Crisis
403(1)
Washington versus the NAACP
403(1)
The Urban League
404(1)
Black Women and the Club Movement
404(2)
The NACW: ``Lifting as We Climb''
405(1)
Phillis Wheatley Clubs
405(1)
Anna Julia Cooper and Black Feminism
405(1)
Women's Suffrage
405(1)
Profile Mary Church Terrell
406(1)
The Black Elite
407(1)
The American Negro Academy
407(1)
The Upper Class
407(1)
Profile Lewis Latimer, Black Inventor
408(1)
Fraternities and Sororities
409(1)
Presidential Politics
409(1)
Frustrated by the Republicans
409(1)
Woodrow Wilson
409(1)
Black Men and the Military in World War I
409(1)
Profile George Washington Carver and Ernest Everett Just
410(4)
The Punitive Expedition to Mexico
411(1)
World War I
411(1)
Black Troops and Officers
412(1)
Discrimination and Its Effects
412(1)
Du Bois's Disappointment
413(1)
Race Riots
414(5)
Atlanta 1906
415(1)
Springfield 1908
415(1)
East St. Louis 1917
416(1)
Houston 1917
417(1)
Chicago 1919
417(1)
Elaine 1919
417(1)
Tulsa 1921
418(1)
Rosewood 1923
418(1)
The Great Migration
419(1)
Why Migrate?
419(1)
Voices A Migrant to the North Writes Home
420(2)
Destinations
421(1)
Migration from the Caribbean
422(1)
Northern Communities
422(3)
Chicago
422(1)
Harlem
423(2)
Families
425(5)
Conclusion
425(1)
Recommended Reading
426(1)
Additional Bibliography
426(2)
Retracing the Odyssey
428(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
429(1)
African Americans and the 1920s
430(28)
Strikes and the Red Scare
433(1)
Varieties of Racism
433(2)
Scientific Racism
433(1)
The Birth of a Nation
434(1)
The Ku Klux Klan
434(1)
Protest, Pride, and Pan-Africanism: Black Organizations in the 1920s
435(1)
The NAACP
435(1)
Voices The Negro National Anthem: Lift Every Voice and Sing
436(1)
``Up You Mighty Race'': Marcus Garvey and the UNIA
436(1)
Profile James Weldon Johnson
437(3)
Voices Marcus Garvey Appeals for a New African Nation
440(1)
Pan-Africanism
440(1)
Labor
441(3)
The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
442(1)
A. Philip Randolph
443(1)
The Harlem Renaissance
444(4)
Before Harlem
444(1)
Writers and Artists
445(2)
White People and the Harlem Renaissance
447(1)
Harlem and the Jazz Age
448(2)
Song, Dance, and Stage
449(1)
Profile Bessie Smith
450(1)
Sports
451(5)
Rube Foster
451(2)
College Sports
453(1)
Conclusion
453(1)
Recommended Reading
454(1)
Additional Bibliography
454(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
455(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
455(1)
Visualizing the Past Going Back to Africa
456(2)
The Great Depression and World War II
458(86)
Black Protest, the Great Depression, and the New Deal
460(28)
The Cataclysm, 1929--1933
462(5)
Harder Times for Black America
463(1)
Black Businesses in the Depression: Collapse and Survival
464(2)
The Failure of Relief
466(1)
Black Protest during the Great Depression
467(3)
The NAACP and Civil Rights Struggles
467(1)
Du Bois Ignites a Controversy
467(1)
Challenging Racial Discrimination in the Courts
468(1)
Black Women and Community Organizing
469(1)
African Americans and the New Deal
470(4)
Roosevelt and the First New Deal, 1933--1935
471(1)
Black Officials in the New Deal
472(1)
Black Social Scientists and the New Deal
473(1)
Voices A Black Sharecropper Details Abuse in the Administration of Agricultural Relief
474(2)
African Americans and the Second New Deal
475(1)
Profile Mary McLeod Bethune
476(2)
Organized Labor and Black America
478(1)
The Communist Party and African Americans
478(2)
The International Labor Defense and the ``Scottsboro Boys''
479(1)
Profile Angelo Herndon
480(2)
Debating Communist Leadership
481(1)
The National Negro Congress
481(1)
Voices Hoboing in Alabama
482(1)
The Tuskegee Study
483(5)
Conclusion
483(1)
Recommended Reading
483(1)
Additional Bibliography
484(2)
Retracing the Odyssey
486(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
486(2)
Meanings of Freedom: Culture and Society in the 1930s and 1940s
488(28)
Black Culture in a Midwestern City
491(1)
The Black Culture Industry and American Racism
491(1)
The Music Culture from Swing to Bebop
492(1)
Profile Charlie Parker
493(2)
Popular Culture for the Masses: Comic Strips, Radio, and Movies
495(3)
The Comics
495(1)
Radio and Race
495(1)
Race, Representation, and the Movies
496(2)
The Black Chicago Renaissance
498(2)
Profile Langston Hughes
500(2)
Jazz in Chicago
501(1)
Gospel in Chicago: Thomas Dorsey
501(1)
Voices Margaret Walker on Black Culture
502(2)
Chicago in Dance and Song: Katherine Dunham and Billie Holiday
503(1)
Black Graphic Art
504(1)
Profile Billie Holiday
505(1)
Black Literature
506(2)
Richard Wright's Native Son
506(1)
James Baldwin Challenges Wright
507(1)
Ralph Ellison and Invisible Man
507(1)
African Americans in Sports
508(1)
Jesse Owens and Joe Louis
508(1)
Breaking the Color Barrier in Baseball
508(1)
Black Religious Culture
509(7)
The Nation of Islam
510(1)
Father Divine and the Peace Mission Movement
510(1)
Conclusion
511(1)
Recommended Reading
511(1)
Additional Bibliography
511(3)
Retracing the Odyssey
514(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
514(2)
The World War II Era and the Seeds of a Revolution
516(28)
On the Eve of War, 1936--1941
519(3)
African Americans and the Emerging World Crisis
519(1)
A. Philip Randolph and the March on Washington Movement
520(2)
Executive Order #8802
522(1)
Race and the U.S. Armed Forces
522(4)
Institutional Racism in the American Military
523(1)
The Costs of Military Discrimination
524(1)
Soldiers and Civilians Protest Military Discrimination
525(1)
Black Women in the Struggle to Desegregate the Military
525(1)
Voices William H. Hastie Resigns in Protest
526(2)
The Beginning of Military Desegregation
527(1)
Voices Separate but Equal Training for Black Army Nurses?
528(1)
The Tuskegee Airmen
528(1)
Profile Mabel K. Staupers
529(2)
The Transformation of Black Soldiers
530(1)
Black People on the Home Front
531(3)
Black Workers: From Farm to Factory
531(1)
The FEPC during the War
532(1)
Anatomy of a Race Riot: Detroit, 1943
532(1)
Old and New Protest Groups on the Home Front
533(1)
Profile Bayard Rustin
534(1)
The Transition to Peace
535(1)
The Cold War and International Politics
535(7)
African Americans in World Affairs: W. E. B. Du Bois and Ralph Bunche
536(1)
Anticommunism at Home
536(1)
Paul Robeson
536(1)
Henry Wallace and the 1948 Presidential Election
537(1)
Desegregating the Armed Forces
537(1)
Conclusion
538(1)
Recommended Reading
538(1)
Additional Bibliography
539(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
540(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
541(1)
Visualizing the Past African-American Soldiers in World War II
542(2)
The Black Revolution
544(126)
The Freedom Movement, 1954--1965
546(34)
The 1950s: Prosperity and Prejudice
548(1)
The Road to Brown
549(4)
Constance Baker Motley and Black Lawyers in the South
549(2)
Brown and the Coming Revolution
551(2)
Brown II
553(1)
Massive White Resistance
553(1)
The Lynching of Emmett Till
553(1)
Voices Letter of the Montgomery Women's Political Council to Mayor W.A. Gayle
554(1)
New Forms of Protest: The Montgomery Bus Boycott
555(2)
The Roots of Revolution
555(1)
Rosa Parks
556(1)
Montgomery Improvement Association
556(1)
Martin Luther King Jr.
556(1)
Profile Rosa Louise McCauley Parks
557(2)
Walking for Freedom
558(1)
Friends in the North
558(1)
Victory
559(1)
No Easy Road to Freedom: 1957--1960
559(1)
Martin Luther King and the SCLC
559(1)
Civil Rights Act of 1957
559(1)
Little Rock, Arkansas
560(1)
Black Youth Stand Up by Sitting Down
560(3)
Sit-Ins: Greensboro, Nashville, Atlanta
560(2)
The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee
562(1)
Freedom Rides
562(1)
A Sight to Be Seen: The Movement at High Tide
563(1)
The Election of 1960
563(1)
The Kennedy Administration and the Civil Rights Movement
563(1)
Profile Robert Parris Moses
564(1)
Voter Registration Projects
565(1)
The Albany Movement
565(1)
Voices Bernice Johnson Reagon on How to Raise a Freedom Song
566(1)
The Birmingham Confrontation
566(1)
A Hard Victory
567(5)
The March on Washington
567(2)
The Civil Rights Act of 1964
569(1)
Mississippi Freedom Summer
569(2)
The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party
571(1)
Selma and the Voting Rights Act of 1965
571(1)
Profile Fannie Lou Hamer
572(8)
Conclusion
574(1)
Recommended Reading
575(1)
Additional Bibliography
575(2)
Retracing the Odyssey
577(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
578(2)
The Struggle Continues, 1965--1980
580(34)
The Fading Dream of Racial Integration: White Backlash and Black Nationalism
583(3)
Malcolm X
583(1)
Malcolm X's New Departure
584(1)
Stokely Carmichael and Black Power
584(1)
The National Council of Churches
585(1)
Voices The Black Panther Party Platform
586(1)
The Black Panther Party
587(2)
Police Repression and the FBI's Cointelpro
587(1)
Prisoners' Rights
588(1)
The Inner-City Rebellions
589(2)
Watts
589(1)
Newark
589(1)
Detroit
590(1)
The Kerner Commission
590(1)
Difficulties in Creating the Great Society
591(1)
Johnson and the War in Vietnam
592(1)
Black Americans and the Vietnam War
593(1)
Project 100,000
593(1)
Johnson: Vietnam Destroys the Great Society
593(1)
Voices They Called Each Other ``Bloods''
594(1)
King: Searching for a New Strategy
595(1)
Profile Muhammad Ali
596(2)
King on the Vietnam War
597(1)
King's Murder
597(1)
The Black Arts Movement and Black Consciousness
598(3)
Poetry and Theater
599(1)
Music
600(1)
The Second Phase of the Black Student Movement
601(2)
The Orangeburg Massacre
601(1)
Black Studies
602(1)
The Election of 1968
603(1)
The Nixon Presidency
603(2)
The ``Moynihan Report'' and FAP
603(1)
Busing
604(1)
Nixon and the War
605(1)
Nixon's Downfall
605(1)
The Rise of Black Elected Officials
605(2)
The Gary Convention and the Black Political Agenda
606(1)
Black People Gain Local Offices
606(1)
Economic Downturn
607(1)
Black Americans and the Carter Presidency
607(1)
Profile Eleanor Holmes Norton
608(6)
Black Appointees
609(1)
Carter's Domestic Policies
609(1)
Conclusion
609(1)
Recommended Reading
610(1)
Additional Bibliography
611(2)
Retracing the Odyssey
613(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
613(1)
Black Politics, White Backlash, 1980 to the Present
614(28)
Ronald Reagan and the Conservative Reaction
617(3)
Dismantling the Great Society
617(1)
Black Conservatives
618(1)
The Thomas--Hill Controversy
618(1)
Debating the ``Old'' and the ``New'' Civil Rights
619(1)
Affirmative Action
620(1)
Voices Black Women in Defense of Themselves
620(3)
The Backlash
621(2)
Black Political Activism in the Age of Conservative Reaction
623(1)
The King Holiday
623(1)
TransAfrica and the Antiapartheid Movement
623(1)
Jesse Jackson and the Rainbow Coalition
624(2)
Policing the Black Community
626(2)
Human Rights in America
627(1)
Police Director Hubert Williams of Newark
628(1)
The Clinton Presidency
628(3)
``It's the Economy, Stupid!''
629(1)
Clinton Signs the Welfare Reform Act
629(1)
Republicans Challenge Clinton
630(1)
Black Politics in the New Millennium: The Contested 2000 Presidential Election
631(1)
Gore v. Bush
631(1)
Profile Donna Brazile
631(1)
Voices Dr. Condoleezza Rice
632(1)
Republican Triumph
633(3)
President George W. Bush's Black Cabinet
633(1)
Education Reform: Leave No Child Behind
634(1)
Reparations
634(1)
HIV/AIDS in America and Africa
635(1)
September 11, 2001
635(1)
The War in Iraq
636(1)
The 2004 Presidential Election
636(6)
Conclusion
637(1)
Recommended Reading
638(1)
Additional Bibliography
638(2)
Retracing the Odyssey
640(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
640(2)
African Americans at the Dawn of a New Millennium
642(28)
Progress and Poverty: Income, Education, and Health
645(3)
High-Achieving African Americans
645(1)
African Americans' Growing Economic Security
645(1)
The Persistence of Black Poverty
646(1)
Racial Incarceration
647(1)
Education One-Half Century after Brown
647(1)
The Health Gap
648(1)
Voices E. Lynn Harris
648(1)
African Americans at the Center of Art and Culture
649(1)
Profile Oliver Harrington and Aaron McGruder
650(3)
The Hip-Hop Nation
652(1)
Origins of a New Music: A Generation Defines Itself
652(1)
Rap Music Goes Mainstream
652(1)
Profile Bob and Ziggy Marley
653(1)
Gansta Rap
654(1)
African-American Intellectuals
654(2)
Afrocentricity
655(1)
African-American Studies Matures
656(1)
Black Religion at the Dawn of the Millennium
656(3)
Black Christians on the Front Line
657(1)
Tensions in the Black Church
657(1)
Black Muslims
658(1)
Louis Farrakahn and the Nation of Islam
659(1)
Millennium Marches
660(1)
Complicating Black Identity in the Twenty-First Century
661(7)
Immigration and African Americans
662(1)
Black Feminism
663(1)
Gay and Lesbian African Americans
664(1)
Conclusion
665(1)
Recommended Reading
665(1)
Additional Bibliography
665(1)
Retracing the Odyssey
666(1)
Review, Research, & Interact
667(1)
Visualizing the Past Signs of Protest in the Struggle for Equality
668(2)
Epilogue: ``A Nation Within a Nation'' 670
Appendix 1(1)
Credits 1(1)
Index 1


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