9780521832366

African Archaeology

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780521832366

  • ISBN10:

    0521832365

  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2005-06-20
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
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Summary

Research in Africa is now accepted as an integral part of global archaeological studies. As well as providing archaeologists with the oldest material, Africa is also widely recognised as the birthplace of modern man and his characteristic cultural patterns. Archaeological study of later periods provides unique and valuable evidence for the development of African culture and society, while ongoing research in Africa provides insights relevant to the interpretation of the archaeological record in other parts of the world. In this fully revised and expanded edition of his seminal archaeological survey, David Phillipson presents a lucid and fully illustrated account of African archaeology from prehistory and the origins of humanity to the age of European colonisation. The work spans the entire continent from the Mediterranean to the Cape of Good Hope and demonstrates the relevance of archaeological research to the understanding of Africa today.

Author Biography

David W. Phillipson is Professor of African Archaeology and Director of the Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology at the University of Cambridge.

Table of Contents

List of illustrations
ix
Sources of illustrations xiii
Preface xv
Introduction
1(14)
Elucidating the African past
1(2)
Archaeology in Africa
3(3)
Linguistics
6(3)
Oral traditions
9(1)
Ethnoarchaeology
10(1)
Africa in world prehistory
10(5)
The emergence of humankind in Africa
15(37)
Definition and process
15(5)
World-wide precursors of the hominids
20(2)
The earliest hominids
22(10)
The oldest discoveries in eastern Africa
32(2)
The Lake Turkana Basin and Olduvai Gorge
34(8)
Central and south-central Africa
42(1)
South Africa
42(5)
The earliest tool-makers
47(5)
The consolidation of basic human culture
52(39)
Acheulean and Sangoan in Africa
52(8)
Acheulean in eastern Africa
60(8)
Acheulean in south-central Africa
68(5)
Acheulean in southern Africa
73(2)
Acheulean in West Africa and the Sahara
75(2)
Acheulean in North Africa
77(4)
Sangoan assemblages
81(3)
Acheulean/Sangoan artefacts and their makers
84(7)
Regional diversification and specialisation
91(56)
The `Middle Stone Age' and the `Late Stone Age'
91(5)
Southern Africa
96(12)
South-central Africa
108(3)
Rock art in southern and south-central Africa
111(5)
Central Africa
116(6)
Eastern Africa
122(6)
West Africa
128(3)
North Africa and the Sahara
131(10)
Changing life-styles and technology
141(6)
The beginnings of permanent settlement
147(18)
North Africa, the Sahara and the Nile Valley
147(9)
East Africa
156(3)
Overview
159(1)
African peoples 10,000 years ago
160(5)
Early farmers
165(49)
Cultivation and herding
165(7)
The Sahara and North Africa
172(9)
The Nile Valley
181(14)
West and Central Africa
195(8)
Ethiopia and the Horn
203(3)
East Africa
206(8)
Iron-using peoples before AD 1000
214(60)
Iron
214(2)
North Africa
216(5)
Egypt and the Arab invasion
221(3)
The Sudan
224(4)
Ethiopia and adjacent regions
228(6)
West Africa
234(11)
Central Africa
245(4)
Eastern and southern Africa
249(12)
The contribution of Bantu linguistic studies
261(4)
Mode of dispersal
265(4)
Madagascar and the Comoro Islands
269(1)
Stone-tool-using herders of southwestern Africa
269(5)
The second millennium AD in sub-Saharan Africa
274(36)
The last 1000 years
274(1)
West Africa
275(9)
Ethiopia, the southern Sudan and adjacent regions
284(4)
The east coast of Africa
288(3)
Bantu-speakers north of the Zambezi
291(6)
Southeastern Africa
297(10)
Southwestern Africa
307(1)
Epilogue
308(2)
Bibliographic guide 310(1)
Bibliographic references 311(58)
Index 369

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