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Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing, The: Concise Edition,9780321291523
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Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing, The: Concise Edition

by ; ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780321291523

ISBN10:
0321291522
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $61.33
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Summary

A concise version of the most successful college rhetoric published in over a decade, The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing: Concise Edition offers the most progressive and teachable introduction now available to academic and personal writing. The four-color guide offers engaging instruction in rhetoric and composition, a flexible sequence of comprehensive writing assignments, and numerous examples of student and professional writing. Solidly grounded in current theory and research, yet eminently practical and teachable, The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing: Concise Edition has set the new standard for first-year composition courses in writing, reading, critical thinking, and inquiry.

Table of Contents

Writing Projects xv
Thematic Contents xvi
Preface xxi
PART ONE A Rhetoric for College Writers
2(90)
Posing Problems: The Demands of College Writing
5(22)
Why Take a Writing Course?
6(1)
Subject-Matter Problems: The Starting Point of Writing
7(8)
Shared Problems Unite Writers and Readers
7(1)
Posing a Problem: A Case Study of a Beginning College Writer
8(1)
Posing Your Own Subject-Matter Questions
9(2)
Characteristics of Good Subject-Matter Questions
11(4)
Rhetorical Problems: Reaching Readers Effectively
15(1)
An Example of a Rhetorical Problem: When to Choose Closed Versus Open Forms
16(6)
Readings
17(1)
David Rockwood, ``A Letter to the Editor''
17(1)
Thomas Merton, ``A Festival of Rain''
18(1)
Distinctions between Closed and Open Forms of Writing
19(1)
Where to Place Your Writing along the Continuum
20(2)
Chapter Summary
22(5)
Brief Writing Project
22(1)
Readings
23(1)
Noel Gaudette (student) ``Questions about Genetically Modified Foods''
23(1)
Brittany Tinker (student), ``Can the World Sustain an American Standard of Living?''
23(1)
Showing Why Your Question Is Problematic and Significant (Option 2)
24(2)
Planning Your Essay
26(1)
Exploring Problems, Making Claims
27(20)
What Does a Professor Want?
28(2)
Learning to Wallow in Complexity
28(2)
Seeing Each Academic Discipline as a Field of Inquiry and Argument
30(1)
Posing an Engaging Question
30(4)
How a Prototypical Introduction Poses a Question and Proposes an Answer
32(2)
Seeking a Surprising Thesis
34(4)
Try to Change Your Reader's View of Your Subject
35(1)
Give Your Thesis Tension
36(2)
Supporting Your Thesis with Points and Particulars
38(3)
How Points Convert Information to Meaning
39(1)
How Removing Particulars Creates a Summary
40(1)
How to Use Points and Particulars When You Revise
41(1)
Chapter Summary
41(6)
Brief Writing Project
41(1)
Playing the Believing and Doubting Game
42(1)
Reading
42(1)
Anonymous (student), ``Believing and Doubting Paul Theroux's Negative View of Sports''
43(1)
Option 1: Energy Issues
44(2)
Option 2: Other Issues
46(1)
Thinking Rhetorically about Purpose, Audience, and Genre
47(26)
How Writers Think about Purpose
48(4)
Purpose as Rhetorical Aim
48(1)
Purpose as a Response to a Motivating Occasion
48(3)
Purpose as a Desire to Change Your Reader's View
51(1)
How Writers Think about Audience
52(2)
Assessing Your Audience
53(1)
How Writers Think about Genre
54(2)
Rhetorical Context and Your Choices about Structure
56(1)
Rhetorical Context and Your Choices about Style
57(3)
Factors That Affect Style
57(1)
Recognizing Different Styles and Voices
57(3)
Rhetorical Context and Your Choices along the Scale of Abstraction
60(2)
Rhetorical Context and Your Choices about Document Design
62(7)
Key Components of Document Design
63(2)
Examples of Different Document Designs
65(4)
A Generic Rhetorical Context for College Writing
69(1)
What Do We Mean by a ``Default'' or ``Generic'' Rhetorical Context?
69(1)
Assignments That Specify Different Rhetorical Contexts
70(1)
Chapter Summary
70(3)
Brief Writing Project
70(3)
Thinking Rhetorically about How Messages Persuade
73(19)
A Brief Introduction to Rhetorical Theory
74(4)
Rhetoric and Symbolic Action
75(1)
Inducing Cooperation: Rhetoric as Inquiry and Persuasion
76(2)
Persuasion and Power
78(1)
The Appeals to Logos, Ethos, and Pathos
78(2)
Angle of Vision
80(5)
Recognizing the Angle of Vision in a Text
80(4)
Analyzing Angle of Vision
84(1)
Thinking Rhetorically about Any Cultural ``Text''
85(3)
Visual Rhetoric
85(2)
The Rhetoric of Clothing and Other Consumer Items
87(1)
Chapter Summary
88(4)
Brief Writing Project
90(1)
Background and Readings
90(2)
PART TWO Writing Projects
92(186)
Writing to Learn
Seeing Rhetorically: The Writer as Observer
95(20)
About Seeing Rhetorically
95(1)
Exploring Rhetorical Observation
95(5)
Exhibit 1: Web Page of the Arctic Power Advocacy Group
96(1)
Exhibit 2: Photograph from a Pro-Environment Newspaper Op Ed Piece
97(1)
Exhibit 3: Photograph Juxtaposing Alaskan Wildlife and Industry
97(1)
Exhibit 4: Photograph and Description on the Arctic Power Web Site
98(1)
Exhibit 5: Excerpt from a Newspaper Feature Article
98(1)
Analyzing the Exhibits
99(1)
Writing Project
99(1)
Understanding Observational Writing
100(8)
Considering the Factors That Shape Perception
101(2)
Conducting a Simple Rhetorical Analysis
103(3)
Readings
106(1)
``Clash on the Congo: Two Eyewitness Accounts''
106(2)
Composing Your Essay
108(5)
Exploring Rationales and Details for Your Two Descriptions
108(1)
Generating Details
109(1)
Shaping and Drafting Your Two Descriptions
109(1)
Using Show Words Rather than Tell Words
110(1)
Revising Your Two Descriptions
111(1)
Generating and Exploring Ideas for Your Self-Reflection
112(1)
Guidelines for Peer Reviews
113(2)
Reading Rhetorically: The Writer as Strong Reader
115(38)
About Reading Rhetorically
115(1)
Exploring Rhetorical Reading
115(5)
Reading
116(1)
Andres Martin, M.D., ``On Teenagers and Tattoos''
116(4)
Writing Project
120(1)
Understanding Rhetorical Reading
120(4)
What Makes College-Level Reading Difficult?
121(1)
Using the Reading Strategies of Experts
122(1)
Reading With the Grain and Against the Grain
123(1)
Understanding Summary Writing
124(5)
Reading for Structure and Content
124(5)
Understanding Strong Response Writing
129(19)
Kinds of Strong Responses
129(1)
Student Example of a Summary/Strong Response Essay: Sean Barry, ``Why Do Teenagers Get Tattoos? A Response to Andres Martin''
130(2)
Questions for Analyzing and Critiquing a Text
132(3)
Questions for Analyzing and Critiquing a Visual-Verbal Text
135(2)
Questions for Developing Your Own Views about the Text's Subject Matter
137(2)
Rereading Strategies to Stimulate Thinking for a Strong Response
139(3)
Readings
142(1)
Florence King, ``I'd Rather Smoke than Kiss''
142(6)
Adbusters.org, ``Welcome to Malboro Country''
148(1)
Composing Your Summary/Strong Response Essay
148(3)
Generating and Exploring Ideas for Your Summary
148(1)
Shaping, Drafting, and Revising Your Summary
149(1)
Generating and Exploring Ideas for Your Strong Response
150(1)
Writing a Thesis for a Strong Response Essay
150(1)
Revising Your Strong Response
151(1)
Guidelines for Peer Reviews
151(2)
Writing to Explore
Writing an Exploratory Essay
153(20)
About Exploratory Writing
153(1)
Exploring Exploratory Writing
154(2)
Writing Project
156(1)
Understanding Exploratory Writing
156(8)
The Essence of Exploratory Prose: Considering Multiple Solutions
157(2)
Readings
159(1)
Christopher Leigh (student), ``An Exploration of How to Prevent Violence in Schools''
159(5)
Composing Your Exploratory Essay
164(7)
Generating and Exploring Ideas
164(3)
Continuing with Research and Dialectic Thinking
167(1)
Shaping and Drafting
168(2)
Revising
170(1)
Guidelines for Peer Reviews
171(2)
Writing to Inform
Writing an Informative (and Surprising) Essay
173(36)
About Informative (and Surprising) Writing
173(2)
Informative Writing and the Audience's Reasons for Reading
173(1)
The Rhetorical Power of ``Surprising Reversal''
174(1)
Exploring Informative (and Surprising) Writing
175(4)
Readings
175(1)
EnchantedLearning.com, ``Tarantulas''
175(1)
Rod Crawford, ``Myths about `Dangerous' Spiders''
176(2)
Writing Project
178(1)
Understanding Informative (and Surprising) Writing
179(20)
Informative Reports
179(1)
Informative Writing Using Surprising Reversal
180(2)
Readings
182(1)
Kerri Ann Matsumoto (student), ``How Much Does It Cost to Go Organic?''
183(1)
Cheryl Carp (student), ``Behind Stone Walls''
184(3)
Shannon King (student), ``How Clean and Green Are Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Cars?'' (APA Style Research Paper)
187(10)
Jonathan Rauch, ``Coming to America''
197(2)
Composing Your Essay---Option A: Informative Report
199(3)
Generating and Exploring Ideas
199(1)
Shaping and Drafting
200(2)
Revising
202(1)
Composing Your Essay---Option B: Informative Writing Using Surprising Reversal
202(4)
Generating and Exploring Ideas
203(2)
Shaping and Drafting
205(1)
Revising
206(1)
Guidelines for Peer Reviews
206(3)
Writing to Analyze
Analyzing Images
209(28)
About Analyzing Images
209(2)
Exploring Image Analysis
211(2)
Writing Project
212(1)
Understanding Image Analysis
213(21)
How Images Create a Rhetorical Effect
213(6)
How to Analyze an Advertisement
219(1)
How Advertisers Target Specific Audiences
220(2)
Sample Analysis of an Advertisement
222(3)
Cultural Perspectives on Advertisements
225(5)
Readings
230(1)
Stephen Bean (student), ``How Cigarette Advertisers Address the Stigma Against Smoking: A Tale of Two Ads''
230(4)
Composing Your Essay
234(1)
Generating and Exploring Ideas
234(1)
Shaping and Drafting
234(1)
Revising
235(1)
Guidelines for Peer Reviews
235(2)
Writing to Persuade
Writing a Classical Argument
237(41)
About Classical Argument
237(1)
Exploring Classical Argument
238(2)
Writing Project
239(1)
Understanding Classical Argument
240(31)
Stages of Development: Your Growth as an Arguer
240(1)
Creating an Argument Frame: A Claim with Reasons
241(2)
Articulating Reasons
243(1)
Articulating Unstated Assumptions
244(2)
Using Evidence Effectively
246(3)
Addressing Objections and Counterarguments
249(3)
Responding to Objections, Counterarguments, and Alternative Views Through Refutation or Concession
252(2)
Appealing to Ethos and Pathos
254(2)
Some Advanced Considerations
256(4)
Readings
260(1)
Ross Taylor (student), ``Paintball: Promoter of Violence or Healthy Fun?''
260(4)
Leonard Pitts, Jr., ``Spare the Rod, Spoil the Parenting''
264(2)
A. J. Chavez (student), ``The Case for (Gay) Marriage''
266(5)
Composing Your Essay
271(4)
Generating and Exploring Ideas
271(2)
Shaping and Drafting
273(2)
Revising
275(1)
Guidelines for Peer Reviews
275(3)
PART THREE A Guide to Composing and Revising
278(62)
Writing as a Problem-Solving Process
281(20)
Understanding How Experts Compose and Revise
282(2)
A Working Description of the Writing Process
284(2)
Improving Your Own Writing Processes
286(7)
Practice the Composing Strategies of Experienced Writers
286(2)
Explore Ideas through Freewriting, Idea Mapping, and Good Talking
288(2)
Draft Purposefully
290(1)
After Drafting, Revise Globally
291(1)
Recognize Kinds of Changes Typically Made in Drafts
292(1)
Using Peer Reviews to Stimulate Revision
293(8)
Becoming a Helpful Reader of Classmates' Drafts
293(4)
Conducting a Peer Review Workshop
297(2)
Responding to Peer Reviews
299(2)
Composing and Revising Closed-Form Prose
301(39)
Lesson 1: Understanding Reader Expectations
302(3)
Unity and Coherence
302(1)
Old before New
303(1)
Forecasting and Fulfillment
304(1)
Lesson 2: Converting Loose Structures into Thesis/Support Structures
305(4)
And Then Writing, or Chronological Structure
306(1)
All About Writing, or Encyclopedic Structure
307(1)
English Writing, or Structure without Surprise
308(1)
Lesson 3: Planning and Visualizing Your Structure
309(7)
Use Scratch Outlines Early in the Writing Process
309(1)
Before Making a Detailed Outline, ``Nutshell'' Your Argument
310(1)
Articulate a Working Thesis and Main Points
311(1)
Sketch Your Structure Using an Outline, Tree Diagram, or Flowchart
311(3)
Let the Structure Evolve
314(2)
Lesson 4: Writing Effective Titles and Introductions
316(6)
What Not to Do: The ``Funnel Introduction''
316(1)
From Old to New: The General Principle of Closed-Form Introductions
316(2)
Typical Elements of a Closed-Form Introduction
318(1)
Forecasting the Whole with a Thesis Statement, Purpose Statement, or Blueprint Statement
319(1)
Writing Effective Titles
320(2)
Lesson 5: Placing Points before Particulars
322(4)
Place Topic Sentences at the Beginning of Paragraphs
323(1)
Revise Paragraphs for Unity
324(1)
Add Particulars to Support Points
325(1)
Lesson 6: Signaling Relationships with Transitions
326(4)
Use Common Transition Words to Signal Relationships
327(2)
Write Major Transitions between Parts
329(1)
Signal Transitions with Headings and Subheadings
330(1)
Lesson 7: Binding Sentences Together by Following the Old/New Contract
330(6)
An Explanation of the Old/New Contract
330(2)
How to Make Links to the ``Old''
332(2)
Avoid Ambiguous Use of ``This'' to Fulfill the Old/New Contract
334(1)
How the Old/New Contract Modifies the Rule ``Avoid Weak Repetition''
335(1)
How the Old/New Contract Modifies the Rule ``Prefer Active over Passive Voice''
335(1)
Lesson 8: Writing Effective Conclusions
336(4)
The Simple Summary Conclusion
337(1)
The Larger Significance Conclusion
337(1)
The Proposal Conclusion
338(1)
The Scenic or Anecdotal Conclusion
338(1)
The Hook and Return Conclusion
338(1)
The Delayed-Thesis Conclusion
338(2)
PART FOUR A Rhetorical Guide to Research
340(37)
The Rhetoric of Web Sites
343(13)
The Web as a Unique Rhetorical Environment
343(8)
Analyzing the Purpose of a Site
344(1)
Reading Web Sites Rhetorically: An Illustration
344(7)
Evaluating a Web Source
351(5)
An Example: Applying Evaluation Criteria
351(5)
Citing and Documenting Sources
356(21)
How to Avoid Plagiarism
356(1)
How to Cite Sources
357(2)
MLA System of In-Text Citation
357(1)
APA System of In-Text Citation
358(1)
Citing a Quotation or Other Data from a Secondary Source
359(1)
Documenting Sources in a ``Works Cited'' List (MLA)
359(1)
MLA Quick Reference Guide for the Most Common Citations
360(2)
Formatting an Academic Paper in MLA Style
362(1)
Student Example of an MLA-Style Research Paper
362(13)
Christopher Leigh, ``The Case Against Metal Detectors in Public Schools''
363(12)
Documenting Sources in a ``References'' List (APA)
375(1)
APA Quick Reference Guide for the Most Common Citations
375(2)
Acknowledgments 377(4)
Index 381


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