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Along These Lines : Writing Paragraphs and Essays

by ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780130868176

ISBN10:
0130868175
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/1/2000
Publisher(s):
PRENTICE HALL PTR

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Summary

For developmental writing courses at the paragraph to essay level. This comprehensive text/workbook focuses on the paragraph and introduces the essay by taking students step-by-step through the writing processgenerating ideas, planning and focusing, drafting and revising, and polishing and proofreading. User-friendly for both students and instructors, it is filled with diverse exercisesmany collaborativethat actively involve students in learning to write. Content includes self-contained chapters on patterns of paragraph development, a section on writing essays, a chapter on reading critically and writing from reading. The text also features timely reading selections and a separate, self-contained grammar section.

Table of Contents

Preface xvii
Supplements xxi
WRITING IN STAGES The Process Approach 1(300)
Introduction
1(2)
Illustration
3(36)
Beginning the Thought Lines
3(8)
Freewriting, Brainstorming, Keeping a Journal
4(1)
Finding Specific Ideas
5(1)
Adding Details to an Idea
6(5)
Focusing the Thought Lines
11(7)
Listing Related Ideas
11(1)
Mapping
12(1)
Forming a Topic Sentence
12(1)
Writing Good Topic Sentences
13(5)
Outlines for a Paragraph
18(3)
Checking Your Details
18(1)
Adding Details When There Are Not Enough
18(1)
Eliminating Details That Do Not Relate to the Topic Sentence
19(1)
From List to Outline
19(2)
Coherence: Putting Your Details in Proper Order
21(4)
Rough Lines for a Paragraph
25(3)
Drafting a Paragraph
25(1)
Revising
25(3)
Final Lines for a Paragraph
28(3)
Giving Your Paragraph a Title
29(1)
The Final Version of a Paragraph
29(1)
Reviewing the Writing Process
30(1)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
31(2)
Writing Your Own Paragraph
33(2)
Peer Review Form for a Paragraph
35(1)
Writing From Reading: Illustration
36(3)
``Spanglish''
36(2)
Janice Castro
Dan Cook
Cristina Garcia
Writing from Reading: ``Spanglish''
38(1)
Description
39(26)
What Is Description?
39(6)
Hints for Writing a Descriptive Paragraph
39(4)
Using Sense Words in Your Descriptions
43(2)
Writing the Description Paragraph in Steps
45(13)
Thought Lines Descrption
45(1)
The Dominant Impression
46(2)
Outlines Description
48(5)
Rough Lines Description
53(2)
Transitions
55(1)
Final Lines Description
56(2)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
58(1)
Writing Your Own Descriptive Paragraph
58(3)
Peer Review Form for a Descriptive Paragraph
61(1)
Writing from Reading: Description
62(3)
``A Present for Popo''
62(2)
Elizabeth Wong
Writing from Reading: ``A Present for Popo''
64(1)
Narration
65(26)
What Is Narration?
65(6)
Give the Narrative a Point
65(4)
Hints for Writing a Narrative Paragraph
69(1)
Using a Speaker's Exact Words in Narrative
70(1)
Writing the Narrative Paragraph in Steps
71(12)
Thought Lines Narration
71(1)
Freewriting for a Narrative Topic
72(1)
Narrowing and Selecting a Suitable Narrative Topic
73(2)
Outlines Narration
75(3)
Rough Lines Narration
78(1)
Revising for Sharper Details
78(1)
Checking the Topic Sentence
79(2)
Using Transitions Effectively in Narration
81(1)
The Draft
81(1)
Final Lines Narration
82(1)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
83(1)
Writing Your Own Narrative Paragraph
84(2)
Peer Review Form for a Narrative Paragraph
86(1)
Writing From Reading: Narration
87(4)
``Rocky Rowf''
87(3)
Edna Buchanan
Writing from Reading: ``Rocky Rowf''
90(1)
Process
91(21)
What Is Process?
91(3)
A Process Involves Steps in Time Order
91(1)
Hints for Writing a Process Paragraph
92(2)
Writing the Process Paragraph in Steps
94(10)
Thought Lines Process
94(1)
Writing a Topic Sentence for a Process Paragraph
95(1)
Outlines Process
96(4)
Rough Lines Process
100(1)
Using the Same Grammatical Person
100(1)
Using Transitions Effectively
101(2)
The Draft
103(1)
Final Lines Process
103(1)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
104(1)
Writing Your Own Process Paragraph
105(2)
Peer Review Form for a Process Paragraph
107(1)
Writing from Reading: Process
108(4)
``How to Land the Job You Want''
108(3)
Davidyne Mayleas
Writing from Reading: ``How to Land the Job You Want''
111(1)
Comparison and Contrast
112(28)
What Is Comparison? What Is Contrast?
112(8)
Hints for Writing a Comparison or Contrast Paragraph
112(2)
Organizing Your Comparison or Contrast Paragraph
114(3)
Hints for Using Patterns of Organization
117(1)
Using Transitions Effectively for Comparison or Contrast
117(3)
Writing the Comparison or Contrast Paragraph in Steps
120(15)
Thought Lines Comparison or Contrast
120(1)
Getting Points of Comparison or Contrast
120(3)
Adding Details to Your Points
123(2)
Outlines Comparison or Contrast
125(4)
Rough Lines Comparison or Contrast
129(1)
The Draft
129(2)
Final Lines Comparison or Contrast
131(1)
Contrast Paragraph: Point-by-Point Pattern
131(1)
The Same Contrast Paragraph: Subject by Subject
132(3)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
135(1)
Writing Your Own Comparison or Contrast Paragraph
135(2)
Peer Review Form for a Comparison or Contrast Paragraph
137(1)
Writing from Reading: Comparison or Contrast
138(2)
``Against All Odds, I'm Just Fine''
138(1)
Brad Wackerlin
Writing from Reading: ``Against All Odds, I'm Just Fine''
139(1)
Classification
140(20)
What Is Classification?
140(4)
Hints for Writing a Classification Paragraph
140(4)
Writing the Classification Paragraph in Steps
144(10)
Thought Lines Classification
144(1)
Brainstorming a Basis for Classification
144(1)
Matching the Points Within the Categories
145(1)
Writing a Topic Sentence for a Classification Paragraph
145(2)
Outlines Classification
147(1)
Effective Order in Classifying
147(3)
Rough Lines Classification
150(1)
Transitions in Classification
150(2)
Final Lines Classification
152(2)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
154(1)
Writing Your Own Classification Paragraph
154(2)
Peer Review Form for Classification Paragraph
156(1)
Writing from Reading: Classification
157(3)
``Three Disciplines for Children''
157(2)
John Holt
Writing from Reading: ``Three Disciplines for Children''
159(1)
Definition
160(22)
What Is Definition?
160(5)
Hints for Writing a Definition Paragraph
160(5)
Writing the Definition Paragraph in Steps
165(11)
Thought Lines Definition
165(1)
Using Questions to Get Details
165(1)
The Topic Sentence
166(2)
Outlines Definition
168(2)
Rough Lines Definition
170(1)
Transitions
170(1)
The Draft
171(3)
Final Lines Definition
174(2)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
176(1)
Writing Your Own Definition Paragraph
176(2)
Peer Review Form for a Definition Paragraph
178(1)
Writing from Reading: Definition
179(3)
Breaking the Bonds of Hate
179(2)
Virak Khiev
Writing from Reading: ``Breaking the Bonds of Hate''
181(1)
Cause and Effect
182(24)
What Is Cause and Effect?
182(3)
Hints for Writing a Cause or Effect Paragraph
182(3)
Writing the Cause or Effect Paragraph in Steps
185(15)
Thought Lines Cause or Effect
185(1)
Freewriting on a Topic
185(2)
Designing a Topic Sentence
187(3)
Outlines Cause or Effect
190(1)
The Order of Causes or Effects
190(4)
Rough Lines Cause or Effect
194(1)
Linking Ideas in Cause or Effect
194(1)
Making the Links Clear
195(1)
Revising the Draft
195(3)
Final Lines Cause or Effect
198(2)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
200(1)
Writing Your Own Cause or Effect Paragraph
200(2)
Peer Review Form for a Cause or Effect Paragraph
202(1)
Writing from Reading: Cause and Effect
203(3)
``Students in Shock''
203(2)
John Kellmayer
Writing from Reading: ``Students in Shock''
205(1)
Argument
206(25)
What Is Argument?
206(4)
Hints for Writing an Argument Paragraph
206(4)
Writing the Argument Paragraph in Steps
210(12)
Thought Lines Argument
210(1)
Grouping Your Ideas
211(3)
Outlines Argument
214(1)
The Order of Reasons in an Argument
214(4)
Rough Lines Argument
218(1)
Checking Your Reasons
218(1)
Explaining the Problem or Issue
218(1)
Transitions That Emphasize
219(1)
A Draft
219(2)
Final Lines Argument
221(1)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
222(1)
Writing Your Own Argument Paragraph
223(1)
Peer Review Form for an Argument Paragraph
224(1)
Writing from Reading: Argument
225(6)
``Athletic Heroes''
225(2)
James Beekman
Writing from Reading: ``Athletic Heroes''
227(1)
``Afrocentric Education Pointless if Girls Are Excluded''
228(1)
Julianne Malveaux
Writing from Reading: ``Afrocentric Education Pointless If Girls Are Excluded''
229(2)
Writing an Essay
231(43)
What Is an Essay?
231(1)
Comparing the Single Paragraph and the Essay
231(1)
Organizing an Essay
232(1)
Writing the Thesis
233(2)
Hints for Writing a Thesis
233(2)
Writing the Essay in Steps
235(9)
Thought Lines Essay
235(1)
Listing Ideas
236(1)
Clustering the Ideas
236(3)
Outlines Essay
239(1)
Hints for Outlining
240(1)
Revisiting the Thought Lines Stage
241(3)
Rough Lines Essay
244(1)
Writing the Introduction
244(3)
Where Does the Thesis Go?
244(1)
Hints for Writing the Introduction
244(3)
Writing the Body of the Essay
247(2)
How Long Are the Body Paragraphs?
247(1)
Developing the Body Paragraphs
247(2)
Writing the Conclusion
249(12)
Revising the Draft
251(1)
Transitions Within Paragraphs
251(1)
Transitions Between Paragraphs
252(1)
A Draft Essay
253(5)
Final Lines Essay
258(1)
Creating a Title
258(1)
The Final Version of an Essay
258(3)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
261(1)
Writing Your Own Essay
262(3)
Peer Review Form for an Essay
265(1)
Writing from Reading: The Essay
266(8)
``Eleven''
266(2)
Sandra Cisneros
Writing from Reading: ``Eleven''
268(1)
``Althea Gibson: Never Give Up''
269(1)
Varla Ventura
Writing from Reading: ``Althea Gibson: Never Give Up''
270(1)
``Send Your Children to the Libraries''
271(2)
Arthur Ashe
Writing from Reading: ``Send Your Children to the Libraries
273(1)
Writing from Reading
274(27)
What Is Writing from Reading?
274(1)
An Approach to Writing from Reading
274(9)
Attitude
274(1)
Prereading
275(1)
Why Preread?
275(1)
Forming Questions Before You Read
276(1)
An Example of the Prereading Step
276(3)
Reading
279(1)
An Example of the Reading Step
279(1)
Rereading with Pen or Pencil
279(1)
An Example of Rereading with Pen or Pencil
280(3)
What the Notes Mean
283(1)
Writing a Summary of a Reading
283(6)
Thought Lines Marking a List of Ideas
284(1)
Selecting a Main Idea
285(1)
Outlines Summary
286(1)
Rough Lines Attributing Ideas in a Summary
287(1)
Final Lines Summary
288(1)
Writing a Reaction to a Reading
289(3)
Writing on a Related Idea
289(1)
Thought Lines Freewriting
289(1)
Brainstorming
289(1)
Developing Points of Agreement or Disagreement
290(1)
Outlines Agree or Disagree Paragraph
290(1)
Rough Lines Agree or Disagree Paragraph
291(1)
Final Lines Agree or Disagree Paragraph
291(1)
Writing for an Essay Test
292(1)
Before the Test: The Steps of Reading
292(1)
During the Test: The Stages of Writing
292(1)
Organize Your Time
293(1)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
293(1)
Writing Your Own Paragraph on ``A Ridiculous Addiction''
294(1)
Gwinn Owens
Peer Review Form for Writing from Reading
295(1)
Writing from Reading
296(5)
``Parental Discretion''
296(2)
Dennis Hevesi
Writing from Reading: ``Parental Discretion''
298(3)
THE BOTTOM LINE Grammar for Writers 301(185)
Introduction
301(1)
Contents
302(4)
The Simple Sentence
306(14)
Recognizing a Sentence
306(1)
Recognizing Verbs
306(2)
More on Verbs
307(1)
Recognizing Subjects
308(1)
More About Recognizing Subjects and Verbs
309(1)
Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases
309(3)
Word Order
312(8)
More on Word Order
313(1)
Word Order in Questions
313(1)
Words That Cannot Be Verbs
314(1)
Recognizing Main Verbs
314(1)
Verb Forms That Cannot Be Main Verbs
315(5)
Beyond the Simple Sentence: Coordination
320(12)
Options for Combining Simple Sentences
320(1)
Using a Comma with a Coordinating Conjunction
320(3)
Where Does the Comma Go?
321(1)
Placing the Comma by Using Subject-Verb S-V Patterns
322(1)
Avoiding Run-On Sentences
323(2)
Using a Semicolon Between Two Simple Sentences
325(1)
Avoiding Comma Splices
325(1)
Using a Semicolon and a Conjunctive Adverb
326(6)
Punctuating After a Conjunctive Adverb
326(6)
Beyond the Simple Sentence: Subordination
332(11)
More on Combining Simple Sentences
332(1)
Using a Dependent Clause to Begin a Sentence
332(1)
Using a Dependent Clause to End a Sentence
332(11)
Using a Subordinating Conjunction
333(1)
Punctuating Complex Sentences
334(1)
Combining Sentences: A Review of Your Options
335(8)
Avoiding Sentence Fragments
343(9)
Recognizing Fragments: Step 1
343(2)
Recognizing Fragments: Step 2
345(2)
Correcting Fragments
347(5)
Using Parallelism in Sentences
352(8)
Achieving Parallelism
353(7)
Using Adjectives and Adverbs
360(9)
What Are Adjectives?
360(1)
Adjectives: Comparative and Superlative Forms
361(2)
What Are Adverbs?
363(1)
Hints About Adjectives and Adverbs
364(5)
Don't Confuse Good and Well or Bad and Badly
365(1)
Not More + -er, or Most + -est
366(1)
Use Than, not Then, in Comparisons
366(1)
When Do I Need a Comma Between Adjectives?
367(2)
Correcting Problems with Modifiers
369(8)
Correcting Modifier Problems
370(5)
Correcting Dangling Modifiers
372(3)
Reviewing the Steps and the Solutions
375(2)
Using Verbs Correctly
377(12)
Using Standard Verb Forms
377(1)
The Present Tense
378(1)
The Past Tense
379(1)
The Four Main Forms of a Verb: Present, Past, Present Participle, and Past Participle
380(1)
Irregular Verbs
381(8)
The Past Tense of Be, Have, Do
382(2)
More Irregular Verb Forms
384(5)
More on Verbs: Consistency and Voice
389(12)
Consistent Verb Tenses
389(3)
The Present Perfect Tense
392(1)
The Past Perfect Tense
393(1)
Passive and Active Voice
394(7)
Avoiding Unnecessary Shifts in Voice
396(2)
Small Reminders About Verbs
398(3)
Making Subjects and Verbs Agree
401(13)
Pronouns as Subjects
402(1)
Special Problems with Agreement
403(3)
Finding the Subject
403(1)
Changed Word Order
404(2)
Compound Subjects
406(1)
Indefinite Pronouns
407(1)
Collective Nouns
408(1)
Making Subjects and Verbs Agree: The Bottom Line
409(5)
Using Pronouns Correctly: Agreement and Reference
414(8)
Nouns and Pronouns
414(1)
Agreement of a Pronoun and Its Antecedent
415(1)
Indefinite Pronouns
415(2)
Avoiding Sexism
416(1)
Collective Nouns
417(3)
Pronouns and Their Antecedents: Being Clear
420(2)
Using Pronouns Correctly: Consistency and Case
422(7)
Choosing the Case of Pronouns
424(2)
Problems Choosing Pronoun Case
425(1)
Common Errors with Case of Pronouns
426(3)
Punctuation
429(16)
The Period
429(1)
The Question Mark
429(1)
The Semicolon
429(2)
The Comma
431(4)
Other Ways to Use a Comma
433(2)
The Apostrophe
435(2)
The Colon
437(1)
The Exclamation Mark
438(1)
The Dash
438(1)
Parentheses
438(1)
The Hyphen
438(1)
Quotation Marks
439(1)
Capital Letters
440(2)
Numbers
442(1)
Abbreviations
442(3)
Spelling
445(9)
Vowels and Consonants
445(1)
Spelling Rule 1: Doubling a Final Consonant
445(1)
Spelling Rule 2: Dropping the Final e
446(1)
Spelling Rule 3: Changing the Final y to i
446(1)
Spelling Rule 4: Adding -s or -es
447(1)
Spelling Rule 5: Using ie or ei
448(1)
Do You Spell It as One Word or Two?
449(2)
Commonly Misspelled Words
451(3)
Words That Sound Alike/Look Alike
454(14)
Words That Sound Alike/Look Alike
454(6)
More Words That Sound Alike/Look Alike
460(8)
Word Choice
468(5)
Precise Language
468(1)
Wordiness
469(1)
Cliches
470(3)
Sentence Variety
473(13)
Balancing Long and Short Sentences
473(3)
Using Different Ways to Begin Sentences
476(2)
Begin with an Adverb
476(1)
Begin with a Prepositional Phrase
476(2)
Using Different Ways to Join Ideas
478(8)
Use an -ing Modifier
478(1)
Use an -ed Modifier
479(2)
Use an Appositive
481(2)
Use a Who, Which, or That Clause
483(3)
APPENDIX ESL Grammar for ESL Students 486(10)
Nouns and Articles
486(3)
Using Articles with Nouns
487(2)
Nouns or Pronouns Used as Subjects
489(1)
Verbs
489(4)
Necessary Verbs
489(1)
-s Endings
490(1)
-ed Endings
490(1)
Two-Word Verbs
491(1)
Contractions and Verbs
492(1)
Prepositions
493(3)
Prepositions That Show Time
493(1)
Prepositions That Show Place
494(2)
Credits 496(1)
Index 497


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