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Along These Lines : Writing Sentences and Paragraphs,9780130850706

Along These Lines : Writing Sentences and Paragraphs

by ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780130850706

ISBN10:
0130850705
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $58.00
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Summary

For Developmental courses at the Sentence to Paragraph level. This comprehensive text/workbook is designed especially for basic students. Filled with exercises and activities, both individual and collaborative, this text involves students in the process of learning to write through reading, listening, practicing and experiencing. The text begins with the principles of grammar and progresses to the writing process for a paragraph. A chapter on Writing from Reading explains how students can write summaries and reaction paragraphs from reading selections, and it provides tips for writing answers to essay exam questions.

Table of Contents

Preface x
Supplements xiv
ALONG THESE LINES: Sentence-Level Skills 1(246)
The Simple Sentence
1(20)
Recognizing a Sentence
1(1)
Recognizing Verbs
1(7)
Helping Verbs
4(2)
More Than One Main Verb
6(2)
Recognizing Subjects
8(2)
More About Recognizing Subjects and Verbs
10(11)
Recognizing the Core Subject
10(1)
Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases
10(3)
Word Order
13(1)
More on Word Order
14(1)
Word Order in Questions
14(1)
Words That Cannot Be Verbs
15(1)
Recognizing Main Verbs
16(1)
Verb Forms That Cannot Be Main Verbs
16(5)
Beyond the Simple Sentence: Coordination
21(14)
Options for Combining Simple Sentences
22(1)
Using a Comma with a Coordinating Conjunction
22(4)
Where Does the Comma Go?
23(1)
Placing the Comma by Using S-V Patterns
23(1)
Compound Sentences
24(1)
Learning the Coordinating Conjunctions
24(2)
Using a Semicolon Between Two Simple Sentences
26(2)
Using a Semicolon and a Conjunctive Adverb
28(7)
Punctuating After a Conjunctive Adverb
29(6)
Avoiding Run-on Sentences and Comma Splices
35(7)
Run-on Sentences
35(3)
Steps for Correcting Run-on Sentences
35(3)
Comma Splices
38(4)
Correcting Comma Splices
38(4)
Beyond the Simple Sentence: Subordination
42(8)
More on Combining Simple Sentences
42(1)
Using a Dependent Clause to Begin a Sentence
42(1)
Using a Dependent Clause to End a Sentence
42(8)
Using Subordinating Words: Subordinating Conjunctions and Relative Pronouns
43(1)
Punctuating Complex Sentences
44(6)
Combining Sentences: A Review of Your Options
50(8)
Options for Combining Sentences
50(8)
Avoiding Sentence Fragments
58(11)
Recognizing Fragments: Step 1
58(2)
Recognizing Fragments: Step 2
60(3)
Correcting Fragments
63(6)
Using Parallelism in Sentences
69(8)
Achieving Parallelism
70(7)
Using Adjectives and Adverbs
77(11)
What Are Adjectives?
77(1)
Adjectives: Comparative and Superlative Forms
78(3)
What Are Adverbs?
81(1)
Hints About Adjectives and Adverbs
82(6)
Do Not Confuse good and Well or bad and Badly
83(1)
Do Not Use more + -er or most + -est
84(1)
Use than, Not then, in Comparisons
85(1)
When Do I Need a Comma Between Adjectives?
85(3)
Correcting Problems with Modifiers
88(10)
Correcting Modifier Problems
89(5)
Correcting Dangling Modifiers
92(2)
Reviewing the Steps and the Solutions
94(4)
Verbs: The Four Main Forms
98(23)
Using Standard Verb Forms
98(1)
The Present Tense
99(4)
The Past Tense
103(3)
The Four Main Forms of a Verb
106(3)
Irregular Verbs
109(12)
The Present Tense of be, have, do
109(2)
The Past Tense of be, have, do
111(3)
More Irregular Verb Forms
114(7)
More on Verb Tenses
121(11)
Helping Verbs and Verb Tenses
121(2)
Fixed-Form Helping Verbs
121(1)
The Helping Verbs can and could, will and would
122(1)
The Present Progressive Tense
123(1)
The Past Progressive Tense
124(1)
The Present Perfect Tense
125(1)
The Past Perfect Tense
126(6)
Small Reminders About Verbs
128(4)
Verbs: Consistency and Voice
132(9)
Consistent Verb Tense
132(3)
Passive and Active Voice
135(6)
Avoiding Unnecessary Shifts in Voice
137(4)
Making Subjects and Verbs Agree
141(17)
Pronouns Used as Subjects
141(2)
Special Problems with Agreement
143(8)
Finding the Subject
143(1)
Changed Word Order
144(2)
Compound Subjects
146(2)
Indefinite Pronouns
148(2)
Collective Nouns
150(1)
Making Subjects and Verbs Agree: A Review
151(7)
Using Pronouns Correctly: Agreement and Reference
158(12)
Agreement of a Pronoun and Its Antecedent
159(1)
Special Problems with Agreement
159(6)
Indefinite Pronouns
159(1)
Avoiding Sexism
160(2)
Collective Nouns
162(3)
Pronouns and Their Antecedents: Being Clear
165(5)
Using Pronouns Correctly: Consistency and Case
170(9)
Choosing the Case of Pronouns
173(1)
Rules for Choosing the Case of Pronouns
174(1)
Problems in Choosing Pronoun Case
174(5)
Choosing the Right Pronoun Case in a Related Group of Words
174(1)
Common Errors with Case of Pronouns
175(4)
Punctuation
179(30)
The Period
179(1)
The Question Mark
179(2)
The Semicolon
181(1)
The Comma
182(10)
Other Ways to Use a Comma
189(3)
The Apostrophe
192(3)
The Colon
195(1)
The Exclamation Mark
196(1)
The Dash
197(1)
Parentheses
197(1)
The Hyphen
197(1)
Quotation Marks
198(2)
Capital Letters
200(4)
Numbers
204(1)
Abbreviations
205(4)
Spelling
209(11)
Vowels and Consonants
209(1)
Doubling a Final Consonant
209(1)
Dropping the Final e
210(1)
Changing the Final y to i
211(1)
Adding -s or -es
211(1)
Using ie or ei
212(3)
How Do You Spell It? One Word or Two?
215(2)
A List of Commonly Misspelled Words
217(3)
Words That Sound Alike/Look Alike
220(18)
Words That Sound Alike/Look Alike
220(7)
More Words That Sound Alike/Look Alike
227(11)
Using Prepositions Correctly
238(9)
Prepositions That Show Time
238(1)
Prepositions That Indicate Place
239(1)
Expressions with Prepositions
239(8)
WRITING IN STEPS: The Process Approach 247(154)
Introduction
247(1)
Learning by Doing
247(1)
Steps Make Writing Easier
247(4)
Writing a Paragraph: Generating Ideas- Thought Lines
251(18)
Beginning the Thought Lines
251(8)
Freewriting, Brainstorming, Keeping a Journal
251(2)
Finding Specific Ideas
253(4)
Selecting an Idea
257(1)
Adding Details to an Idea
258(1)
Focusing the Thought Lines
259(10)
Marking Related Ideas
259(1)
Mapping
260(2)
Forming a Topic Sentence
262(1)
Hints About Topic Sentences
262(7)
Writing a Paragraph: Devising a Plan-Outlines
269(11)
Checking Your Details
269(11)
Adding Details When There Are Not Enough
269(3)
Eliminating Details That Do Not Relate to the Topic Sentence
272(2)
From List to Outline
274(1)
Coherence
275(1)
Determining the Order of Details
275(2)
Where the Topic Sentence Goes
277(3)
Writing a Paragraph: Writing, Revising, and Editing the Drafts-Rough Lines
280(6)
Rough Lines
280(6)
Revising and Editing the Draft
280(6)
Writing a Paragraph: Polishing, Proofreading, and Preparing the Final Copy-Final Lines
286(9)
Correcting the Final Draft of a Paragraph
286(2)
Giving Your Paragraph a Title
288(1)
Reviewing the Writing Process
288(1)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
289(1)
Writing Your Own Paragraph
290(4)
Peer Review Form for a Paragraph
294(1)
Writing a Paragraph: Focus on Coherence and Unity
295(43)
Thought Lines Focus on Coherence and Unity
295(10)
Listing Ideas
296(1)
Adding Specific Details by Brainstorming
296(3)
Focusing the Thought Lines
299(1)
Coherence: Grouping the Details and Selecting a Logical Order
299(1)
Unity: Selecting a Topic Sentence
300(5)
Outlines Focus on Coherence and Unity
305(5)
Rough Lines Focus on Coherence and Unity
310(5)
Transitions
311(1)
Revising the Draft for Transitions and Added Ideas
312(3)
Final Lines Focus on Coherence and Unity
315(2)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
317(2)
Writing Your Own Paragraph
319(3)
Peer Review Form for a Paragraph: Focus on Coherence and Unity
322(1)
Writing From Reading
323(1)
``Binge Nights: The Emergency on Campus''
323(3)
Michael Winerip
Writing from Reading ``Binge Nights: The Emergency on Campus''
324(2)
``The Baby Myna''
326(7)
Ved Mehta
Writing from Reading ``The Baby Myna''
331(2)
``I Fell in Love, Or My Hormones Awakened''
333(5)
Judith Ortiz Cofer
Writing from Reading ``I Fell in Love, Or My Hormones Awakened''
337(1)
Writing a Paragraph: Focus on Support and Details
338(33)
Thought Lines focus on Support and Details
338(7)
Focusing the Thought Lines
341(1)
Grouping the Details
341(4)
Outlines focus on Support and Details
345(6)
Adding Support
346(1)
A Revised Outline
347(4)
Rough Lines focus on Support and Details
351(5)
Using Sense Words in Your Details
351(1)
Revising the Draft for More Specific Details and Sense Words
352(4)
Final Lines focus on Support and Details
356(1)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
357(1)
Writing Your Own Paragraph
358(3)
Peer Review Form for a Paragraph: Focus on Support and Details
361(1)
Writing From Reading
362(1)
``I Wish''
362(2)
Lillian Gwin
Writing from Reading ``I Wish''
363(1)
``Death Row''
364(4)
John Grisham
Writing from Reading ``Death Row''
366(2)
``A Different Mirror''
368(3)
Ronald Takaki
Writing from Reading ``A Different Mirror''
369(2)
Writing From Reading
371(30)
What Is Writing from Reading?
371(7)
Attitude
371(1)
Prereading
371(1)
Why Preread?
372(1)
Forming Questions Before You Read
372(1)
An Example of the Prereading Step
373(1)
``Part-Time Job May Do Teenagers More Harm Than Good''
373(1)
Gary Klott
Reading
374(1)
An Example of the Reading Step
375(1)
Answers to Prereading Questions
375(1)
Rereading with Pen or Pencil
375(1)
An Example of Rereading with Pen or Pencil
375(2)
What the Notes Mean
377(1)
Writing a Summary of a Reading
378(5)
Thought Lines Marking a List of Ideas
378(1)
Thought Lines Selecting a Main Idea
379(1)
Outlines Summary
380(1)
Rough Lines Attributing Ideas in a Summary
381(1)
Final Lines Summary
382(1)
Writing a Reaction to a Reading
383(2)
Thought Lines Reaction to a Reading: Freewriting
383(1)
Thought Lines Selecting a Topic, Listing and Developing Ideas
383(1)
Outlines Reaction to a Reading
384(1)
Rough Lines Reaction to a Reading
384(1)
Final Lines Reaction to a Reading
385(1)
Writing About Agreement or Disagreement
385(3)
Thought Lines Agree or Disagree Paragraph
385(1)
Outlines Agree or Disagree Paragraph
386(1)
Rough Lines Agree or Disagree Paragraph
387(1)
Final Lines Agree or Disagree Paragraph
387(1)
Writing for an Essay Test
388(2)
Before the Test: The Steps of Reading
388(1)
During the Test: The Stages of Writing
388(1)
Organize Your Time
389(1)
Writing from Reading: A Summary
390(1)
Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment
390(2)
Writing from Reading ``Part-Time Job May Do Teenagers More Harm Than Good''
390(2)
Peer Review From for Writing from Reading
392(1)
Writing from Reading
393(1)
``New Directions''
393(4)
Maya Angelou
Writing from Reading ``New Directions''
396(1)
``Home Away from Home''
397(4)
Beth Nieman
Writing from Reading ``Home Away from Home''
400(1)
Appendix: Grammar for ESL Students 401(8)
Nouns and Articles
401(3)
Using Articles with Nouns
402(2)
Nouns or Pronouns Used as Subjects
404(1)
Verbs
404(5)
Necessary Verbs
404(1)
s Endings
404(1)
ed Endings
405(1)
Two-Word Verbs
406(1)
Contractions and Verbs
407(2)
Credits 409(1)
Index 410


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