CART

(0) items

American Government Election Update,9780131856356
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

American Government Election Update

by
Edition:
10th
ISBN13:

9780131856356

ISBN10:
0131856359
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 10th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2005.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

Related Products


  • American Government
    American Government
  • American Government
    American Government
  • American Government
    American Government
  • American Government
    American Government
  • American Government
    American Government
  • American Government
    American Government
  • American Government
    American Government
  • American Government Plus MySearchLab with eText -- Access Card Package
    American Government Plus MySearchLab with eText -- Access Card Package
  • American Government& 2006 Election Update
    American Government& 2006 Election Update
  • American Government, Election Update
    American Government, Election Update
  • American Government: Updated Election Edition (Election Reprint)
    American Government: Updated Election Edition (Election Reprint)





Summary

For courses in American Government. This text presents a succinct and timely approach to the principles and practices of the American governmental system. Concentrating on the most significant issues necessary to understanding American government, this book is specifically structured to engage today's students through a concise, stimulating style that is free of ideological and political bias. In order to stay brief, while intellectually stimulating, each edition is revised thoroughly to focus on the current issues of greatest significance.

Table of Contents

Preface xvii
PART I THE FRAMEWORK OF GOVERNMENT
Politics, Democracy, and the American People
1(19)
The Nature of Politics
1(3)
Politics and Power
2(1)
The Bases of Political Power
2(1)
Politics and Government
3(1)
The Meaning of Democracy
4(10)
Close-Up: ``Ballot Initiatives''
5(1)
The Bases of Democracy
5(9)
Democracy and Diversity
14(6)
Close-Up: ``Hispanic Americans''
16(1)
Conclusion
17(1)
Questions for Thought
17(1)
Internet Activity
17(1)
Key Terms
18(1)
Suggested Reading
18(1)
Notes
18(2)
From Colonialism to Constitutionalism
20(26)
The Road to Independence
22(2)
Early Attempts at Cooperation
22(1)
The First Continental Congress
23(1)
The Revolution
23(1)
The Declaration of Independence
24(1)
The Articles of Confederation
24(2)
The Constitutional Convention
26(9)
The Delegates
28(1)
The Issues
29(3)
Ratification
32(3)
The United States Constitution
35(5)
Federalism
36(1)
Separation of Powers
36(1)
Checks and Balances: Shared Powers
36(2)
Judicial Review
38(1)
Popular Sovereignty
38(1)
National Supremacy
39(1)
Constitutional Change and Development
40(6)
Amending the Constitution
40(1)
Close-Up: ``A Second Method of Proposing Amendments''
41(1)
Other Means of Constitutional Development
42(1)
Close-Up: ``The Twenty-Seventh Amendment''
43(1)
Conclusion
44(1)
Questions for Thought
44(1)
Internet Activity
44(1)
Key Terms
45(1)
Suggested Reading
45(1)
Notes
45(1)
The Federal System
46(24)
Federalism in the Constitution
49(6)
Powers of the National Government
49(1)
Close-Up: ``Coercion by Congress''
50(1)
Limitations on the National Government
51(1)
Powers of the States
52(1)
Concurrent Powers
52(1)
Limitations on the States
52(1)
Interstate Relations
53(1)
Close-Up: ``Gay Marriage and Full Faith and Credit''
54(1)
Mutual Obligations of the National and State Governments
55(3)
Close-Up: ``Life, Death, and the Federal System''
57(1)
National Supremacy
57(1)
Federalism in Theory and Practice
58(7)
The Growth of the Grant System
61(1)
Centralized Federalism
61(1)
The New Federalism
62(3)
The Supreme Court and Contemporary Federalism
65(5)
Conclusion
66(1)
Questions for Thought
67(1)
Internet Activities
67(1)
Key Terms
68(1)
Suggested Reading
68(1)
Notes
68(2)
PART II POLITICS AND THE AMERICAN PEOPLE
Public Opinion and the Mass Media
70(28)
The American Political Culture
71(1)
Political Socialization
72(2)
The Family
72(1)
The School
72(1)
The Peer Group
72(1)
The Media
73(1)
Social Class: Income, Occupation, and Education
73(1)
Race and Religion
74(1)
Place of Residence
74(1)
History and Political Events
74(1)
The Nature of Public Opinion
74(2)
Measuring Public Opinion
76(6)
Scientific Polling
77(1)
How Polls Are Conducted
77(3)
Close-Up: ``Television and the 2000 Election in Florida''
80(1)
Criticisms of Public-Opinion Polling
80(2)
The Nature of the Media
82(12)
Roles of the Media
84(1)
The Media and Elections
85(1)
Television Advertising
86(2)
The Question of Media Bias
88(1)
The New Media
89(1)
The Internet
90(1)
Proposals for Reform
91(1)
Close-Up: ``Internet Voting: Is It the Wave of the Future?''
92(1)
Proposals for Reform
93(1)
How Americans Participate
94(4)
Conclusion
95(1)
Questions for Thought
96(1)
Internet Activities
96(1)
Key Terms
96(1)
Suggested Reading
96(1)
Notes
97(1)
Political Parties and Interest Groups
98(30)
Political Parties
99(2)
The American Two-Party System
101(6)
Party Competition
103(1)
The Nature of American Political Parties
104(1)
Minor Parties
105(1)
Close-Up: ``Minor Parties---Past and Present''
106(1)
The Structure of Political Parties
107(3)
The National Parties
107(1)
The State and Local Parties
107(2)
Decentralization of Party Power
109(1)
Parties and Voters: The Decline of Party Identification
110(2)
The Party in the Legislature
112(1)
Reform or Status Quo?
113(1)
Interest Groups
113(15)
The Growth of Interest Groups
114(1)
The Structure of Interest Groups
115(1)
Types of Interest Groups
115(7)
Funding of Interest Groups
122(1)
How Powerful Are Interest Groups?
123(1)
Close-Up: ``Rules for Lobbyists''
124(1)
Conclusion
125(1)
Questions for Thought
125(1)
Internet Activities
126(1)
Key Terms
126(1)
Suggested Reading
126(1)
Notes
127(1)
Nominations and Elections
128(32)
Nomination Procedures
129(2)
Nominating a Presidential Candidate
131(5)
Choosing the Delegates
131(2)
The Preconvention Campaign
133(1)
The National Convention
134(2)
The Campaign
136(7)
Campaign Financing
137(1)
Campaign Finance Legislation
137(4)
Campaign Strategy
141(2)
Television Debates
143(1)
The Election
144(7)
Registration
144(1)
Balloting
144(1)
Electing the President and Vice President: The Electoral College
145(1)
Close-Up: ``The Electoral College''
146(3)
Congressional Elections
149(2)
How Americans Vote (and Don't Vote)
151(9)
Who Votes?
151(2)
How Do Americans Vote?
153(4)
Conclusion
157(1)
Questions for Thought
157(1)
Internet Activities
158(1)
Key Terms
158(1)
Suggested Reading
158(1)
Notes
158(2)
PART III THE INSTITUTIONS OF GOVERNMENT
Congress
160(32)
The Functions of Congress
161(9)
Legislative Functions: Expressed Powers
162(4)
Legislative Functions: Implied Powers
166(1)
Representation
167(1)
Close-Up: ``Jeannette Rankin''
167(1)
Other Constitutional Functions
168(2)
The Congressional District
170(2)
Close-Up: ``Politics and the Census''
171(1)
The Two Houses: Similarities and Differences
172(1)
Close-Up: ``The First Black Senator''
173(1)
The Members of Congress
173(6)
Congressional Leadership
174(3)
Senate Leadership
177(2)
The Committee System
179(5)
Types of Committees
179(2)
Committee Assignments
181(1)
Committee Chairs
182(1)
The Major Committees
183(1)
The Legislative Bureaucracy
184(1)
The Legislative Process
184(8)
The Introduction of a Bill
184(2)
The Committee Stage
186(1)
The Calendar
187(1)
Floor Procedure
187(1)
Close-Up: ``The Filibuster''
188(1)
Presidential Approval or Disapproval
189(1)
Conclusion
189(1)
Questions for Thought
190(1)
Internet Activities
190(1)
Key Terms
190(1)
Suggested Reading
190(1)
Notes
191(1)
The Chief Executive
192(34)
Close Up: ``A President by Any Other Name . . .''
194(1)
Selection and Removal of the President
194(4)
Who May Become President?
194(1)
Succession and Disability
195(2)
Impeachment and Removal
197(1)
Close-Up: ``A President Impeached . . . But Not Convicted''
197(1)
The President's Roles and Powers
198(14)
Chief of State
198(1)
Roles Related to Foreign Affairs
199(3)
Commander-in-Chief
202(2)
Chief Administrator
204(1)
Close-Up: ``The USA Patriots Act of 2001''
205(1)
Chief Legislator
206(3)
Party Leader
209(1)
National Opinion Leader
210(1)
Manager of the Economy
211(1)
Limits on the President's Powers
212(6)
Judicial Review
213(1)
The War Powers Resolution
213(1)
Close-Up: ``The Watergate Scandal''
214(2)
The Budget and Impoundment Control Act
216(1)
The Bureaucracy
216(1)
The Media
217(1)
Public Opinion
217(1)
The Personal Dimension
218(3)
Beliefs, Motivations, Skills
218(2)
Presidential Character
220(1)
The Vice President
221(5)
Conclusion
222(1)
Questions for Thought
223(1)
Internet Activities
223(1)
Key Terms
224(1)
Suggested Reading
224(1)
Notes
224(2)
The Federal Bureaucracy
226(26)
The Organization of the Executive Branch
228(9)
Line Agencies
228(3)
Close-Up: ``The Homeland Security Department''
231(1)
Close-Up: ``The Federal Reserve System''
232(1)
Staff Agencies
232(3)
Close-Up: ``The `East Wing'''
235(2)
The Federal Bureaucrats
237(5)
The Size of the Bureaucracy
237(1)
Who Are the Bureaucrats?
238(4)
Sources of Bureaucratic Power
242(1)
Size
242(1)
Expertise
242(1)
The Agency/Committee/Interest Group Triangle
242(1)
Delegation of Power by Congress
243(1)
Restraints on the Bureaucracy
243(9)
The Powers of the President
244(1)
The Powers of Congress
245(3)
Whistleblowers
248(1)
Other Restraints
248(1)
Conclusion
249(1)
Questions for Thought
250(1)
Internet Activities
250(1)
Key Terms
250(1)
Suggested Reading
251(1)
Notes
251(1)
The Judiciary
252(30)
The Law
254(3)
Criminal and Civil Law
256(1)
The Adversary System
256(1)
The Role of the Courts
257(1)
The Role of the Judge
257(1)
The Dual Court System
257(6)
Close-Up: ``The Supreme Court as a Trial Court''
259(1)
The State Courts
259(1)
The Federal Courts
260(3)
The Supreme Court
263(4)
Oral Arguments
263(1)
Conferences
264(1)
Opinions
264(1)
Close-Up: ``Dissenting Opinions''
265(1)
The Role of the Chief Justice
265(1)
Bringing a Case before the Court
266(1)
The Court's Workload
267(1)
Selection of Federal Judges
267(5)
Selecting Judges for Lower Federal Courts
267(1)
Judicial Appointments, 1980-2004
268(1)
Appointing Supreme Court Justices
269(1)
Confirmation and Tenure
270(2)
The Functions of the Judiciary
272(6)
Judicial Review
273(2)
Restrictions on the Court
275(1)
Close-Up: ``Impeachment of Federal Judges''
275(2)
Close-Up: ``FDR's `Court-Packing' Plan''
277(1)
The Supreme Court: A Brief History
278(4)
Conclusion
279(1)
Questions for Thought
279(1)
Internet Activities
279(1)
Key Terms
280(1)
Suggested Reading
280(1)
Notes
280(2)
PART IV THE RIGHTS OF THE INDIVIDUAL
Civil Liberties
282(28)
Applying the Bill of Rights to the States
284(1)
Freedom of Religion
284(4)
The Free Exercise Clause
284(2)
The Establishment Clause
286(2)
Freedom of Speech, Press, Assembly, and Petition
288(8)
Censorship: The Rules Against Prior Restraint
289(1)
Sedition: Advocacy of Illegal Acts
290(1)
Close-Up: ``Can Racist Speech Be Prohibited?''
290(1)
Protecting Public Order: The First Amendment in Public Places
291(1)
Protecting Public Morals: Obscenity
292(1)
Close-Up: ``Free Speech and the Internet''
293(1)
Libel and Slander
293(1)
The First Amendment and Campaign Spending
294(1)
The Right of Association
294(1)
Commercial Speech
295(1)
Symbolic Speech
295(1)
Free Press and a Fair Trial
296(1)
The Rights of the Criminally Accused
296(14)
Search and Seizure
297(1)
The Exclusionary Rule
298(1)
Electronic (and Other Forms of) Surveillance
299(1)
Freedom from Self-Incrimination
300(1)
Indictment by a Grand Jury
301(1)
Double Jeopardy
301(1)
The Right to Counsel
301(1)
The Right to an Impartial Jury
302(2)
Confessions
304(1)
Close-Up: ``Silence and Self-Incrimination''
304(2)
``Cruel and Unusual Punishment'' and the Death Penalty
306(1)
Conclusion
307(1)
Questions for Thought
307(1)
Internet Activity
308(1)
Key Terms
308(1)
Suggested Reading
308(1)
Notes
308(2)
Civil Rights
310(28)
The Rights of African Americans
312(12)
Close-Up: ``Asians in the United States: The Early Years''
315(1)
School Desegregation and Brown v. Board of Education
316(4)
The Civil Rights Act of 1964
320(2)
Close-Up: ``Landmark Victories For Gays''
322(2)
Women's Rights
324(5)
Equality in Employment
326(1)
The Constitution and Women's Rights
326(3)
The Civil Rights of the Disabled
329(1)
Affirmative Action
330(2)
The Right to Vote
332(6)
The Voting Rights Act of 1965
333(1)
Conclusion
334(1)
Questions for Thought
335(1)
Internet Activities
335(1)
Key Terms
335(1)
Suggested Reading
336(1)
Notes
336(2)
PART V PUBLIC POLICY
Public Policy---What Government Does
338(22)
What Is Public Policy?
339(3)
Who Makes Public Policy?
340(1)
Types of Public Policy
341(1)
The Policy-Making Process
342(5)
Stages of the Process
342(1)
Close-Up: ``Getting Social Security Reform on the Policy Agenda''
343(2)
The Context of Policy Making
345(1)
The Structure of Policy Making
346(1)
Economic Policy
347(4)
Tools and Strategies for Managing the Economy
347(2)
Close-Up: ``Pension Reform: A Global View''
349(2)
Social Welfare Policy
351(9)
Conclusion
357(1)
Questions for Thought
357(1)
Internet Activities
357(1)
Key Terms
357(1)
Suggested Reading
358(1)
Notes
358(2)
Foreign Policy
360(60)
Competing Theories of International Relations
362(1)
Realism
362(8)
Realism and American Foreign Policy
364(1)
Close-Up: ``The Monroe Doctrine''
365(3)
Close-Up: ``President Washington's Farewell Address''
368(1)
Close-Up: ``The Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine''
369(1)
Liberalism
370(4)
President Wilson and World War I
371(1)
Contemporary Liberalism
372(1)
Selective Engagement
373(1)
Liberalism and Realism as Enduring Perspectives
374(1)
The Post-Cold War Period
374(1)
The Rise of International Terrorism
375(3)
The Preemption Doctrine
377(1)
American Foreign Policy: The Domestic Context
378(9)
Governmental Sources
379(2)
Close Up: ``The Supreme Court and Foreign Affairs''
381(1)
Societal Sources
382(1)
Conclusion
383(1)
Questions for Thought
384(1)
Internet Activities
384(1)
Key Terms
384(1)
Suggested Reading
384(1)
Notes
385(2)
APPENDICES
A The Declaration of Independence
387(2)
B The Articles of Confederation
389(5)
C The Antifederalists
394(4)
D The Federalist
398(7)
E The Constitution of the United States of America
405(7)
F Amendments to the Consititution
412(6)
G Presidents and Vice Presidents of the United States
418(2)
Glossary 420(9)
Photo Credits 429(1)
Name Index 430(3)
Subject Index 433

Excerpts

It was early in a new century and a new millennium. I was working on the revisions of the tenth edition of this textbook on American government. My thoughts turned to the political system of the United States one hundred years ago. How did it compare with the system that operated at the start of the twenty-first century? Had we improved American democracy in the past hundred years? A detailed examination of these questions would require the production of a book-length manuscript and I was faced with publishing deadlines for this volume. But I have put together a few thoughts on the state of American democracy then and now. My overall conclusion is that despite some weaknesses in our present system, our political system is markedly improved and far more democratic today than it was a hundred years ago. Consider the following facts. In 1900, African Americans in the South lived in a segregated society. Separation of the races existed in both the private and public spheres. Private companies and individuals were free to discriminate and government laws required racial segregation in all public facilities from schools and parks to bathrooms and drinking fountains. The entire system of segregation was given legal sanction by the 1896 decision of the United States Supreme Court inPlessy v. Ferguson.This case held that government could require the separation of the races so long as the facilities provided to each group were equal. In reality," separate but equal" meant separation but not equality for black Americans. It was only with the 1954 Supreme Court case ofBrown v. Board of Educationand the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that racial segregation was gradually brought to an end in this country. Voting rights in the United States were also restricted in 1900. Despite the Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution that protected African Americans from being denied the right to vote because of their race, very few voted in the American South. Devious legal schemes, intimidation, and violence kept most African Americans from voting in this region of the nation. It was not until after the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that blacks were freely able to vote in the South. Similarly, few women voted in the United States at the beginning of the twentieth century. Although women had been granted the right to vote in a number of states, no constitutional provision existed to bar the states from denying them the right to vote. That changed in 1920 with the adoption of the Nineteenth Amendment. In the decades since this change occurred, more and more women have participated in American politics. Indeed, in recent presidential elections, more women have voted than men. In 1900, United States senators were chosen by the state legislatures. Most often this meant that a few influential state political leaders made these important decisions. In 1913, the Seventeenth Amendment to the Constitution was adopted, making United States senators popularly elected by the voters in each state. Finally, in 1900, there was little in the way of social legislation to protect Americans when they became unemployed, disabled, ill, or when they retired. They were forced to depend on relatives or on charity provided by churches and other private organizations. The country did not even have child labor laws to protect children from working long hours in factories and mines. Although some European countries had established social security systems by 1900--Germany, for example--it was not until 1935 that the United States adopted legislation that established the Social Security retirement system. Later in the same decade, Congress also enacted laws that established the maximum number of hours a person could work each week, created a minimum wage, outlawed child labor, and formulated a program of unemployment insurance. And it was not until the 1960s that Congress passed legislation t


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...