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American Media History (with InfoTrac),9780534644017
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American Media History (with InfoTrac)

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780534644017

ISBN10:
0534644015
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
6/24/2004
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing

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Summary

Understand the development and impact of the American media with AMERICAN MEDIA HISTORY with InfoTrac?! Each chapter tells the story of a medium's development and focuses on the major figures involved in the development of that particular medium. Brief biographies of important media figures and other primary materials are incorporated.

Author Biography

Anthony R. Fellow, Ph.D., professor of communications and coordinator of the journalism program at California State University, Fullerton John Tebbel, professor emeritus of journalism at New York University

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Introduction Before the American Experience 1(1)
The Impact of the Printing Press
2(3)
The Printing Press in Early England
5(3)
John Milton and British Roots of Free Expression
8(1)
Thomas Hobbes and John Locke
9(1)
``Cato's Letters''
10(1)
Conclusion
11
Media Profile: Johannes Gutenberg
2(11)
I 1690--1833 THE PRESS IN EARLY AMERICA
13(2)
The Colonial Years
15(23)
Printing in British America
17(3)
Benjamin Harris, Printer
20(1)
John Campbell, Favored Printer
21(1)
James Franklin, Rebel Printer
22(5)
Benjamin Franklin, Cautious Printer
27(2)
Tests of Press Freedom
29(6)
Anna Zenger and Colonial Women of the Press
35(2)
Conclusion
37
Media Profile: Benjamin Franklin
26(12)
The Press and the Revolution
38(27)
A Reluctant Revolution
39(1)
The Seven Years' War
39(1)
The Stamp Act of 1765
40(2)
Voices on the Road to Revolution
42(1)
James Rivington, the Tory Voice
43(2)
Hugh Gaine, Turncoat Editor
45(3)
John Dickinson, the Whig Voice
48(1)
Isaiah Thomas, the Patriot Voice
49(1)
Samuel Adams, the ``Master of the Puppets''
50(2)
Edes and Gill's Boston Gazette
52(3)
The Sons of Liberty
55(3)
Declaration of Independence
58(1)
Newspapers as a Revolutionary Force
59(1)
The Revolutionary War's Impact on the Press
60(1)
Freedom of the Press
61(2)
Conclusion
63
Media Profile: Thomas Paine
46(6)
Media Profile: Samuel Adams
52(13)
The Press and the Founding of a Nation
65(20)
The Bill of Rights and Press Freedom
67(2)
The Federalists and Federalist Editors
69(2)
The Federalist Editors: Fenno, Cobbett, and Russell
71(1)
The Anti-Federalists and Anti-Federalist Editors
72(1)
Anti-Federalist Editors: Freneau and Bache
72(4)
The Role of the Press in Political Coverage
76(1)
Washington and the Press
76(2)
Adams and the Press
78(1)
Jefferson and the Press
79(1)
Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798
79(2)
The Party Press in Retrospect
81(1)
Conclusion
82
Media Profile: Philip Freneau
74(11)
II 1833--1865 A NEW POLITICS, A NEW PRESS
85(28)
A Press for the Masses
87(26)
A Very Different Newspaper
88(1)
Benjamin Day and the New York Sun
88(2)
James Gordon Bennett and the New York Herald
90(2)
James Gordon Bennett as Innovator
92(3)
James Gordon Bennett and the Great Moral War
95(2)
Horace Greeley and the New York Tribune
97(3)
The New York Tribune
100(2)
Editorial Influence of the ``Great Moral Organ''
102(2)
The Penny Press and the Mexican War
104(3)
Henry Jarvis Raymond and the New York Times
107(2)
Why a Press for the Masses?
109(2)
Conclusion
111
Media Profile: William Cullen Bryant
99(9)
Media Profile: Andrew Jackson
108(5)
III 1865--1900 THE AGE OF NEW JOURNALISM
113(104)
A Divided Nation, A Divided Media
117(33)
Roots of the Conflict
118(1)
Before the Storm
119(1)
William Lloyd Garrison and the Liberator
120(1)
Lovejoy, Birney, and Tappan
121(2)
The Black Press
123(2)
Frederick Douglass and The North Star
125(2)
The Press on the Eve of War
127(1)
The Civil War Press in the North
128(1)
Women Correspondents of the North
129(1)
The Civil War Press in the South
130(2)
Magazines of the North and the South
132(1)
Lincoln and the Press
133(4)
Lincoln and Greeley
137(1)
Censorship and the Civil War
138(1)
``Mob Censorship''
139(1)
Censorship by Armies
140(2)
Impact of the Civil War on the Press
142(2)
The Civil War and the Practice of Journalism
144(4)
Conclusion
148
Media Profile: Harriet Beecher Stowe
122(8)
Media Profile: Jane Grey Cannon Swisshelm
130(20)
The Yellow Press and the Times
150(31)
Newspapers as Public Defenders
151(3)
Joseph Pulitzer
154(1)
The St. Louis Post-Dispatch
155(1)
The New York World
156(4)
Pulitzer's New Journalism
160(3)
Pulitzer's Sunday World
163(1)
Yellow Journalism
164(1)
William Randolph Hearst
165(1)
The San Francisco Examiner
166(1)
The New York Morning Journal
167(2)
The Spanish-American War of 1898
169(1)
Press Coverage of the War
170(3)
McKinley's Assassination
173(3)
Adolph Ochs and the New York Times
176(2)
Conclusion
178
Media Profile: Nellie Bly
158(16)
Media Profile: Robert S. Abbott
174(7)
Magazines, Muckraking, and Public Relations
181(36)
Robber Barons on the Rise
181(1)
Enter the Muckrakers
182(2)
Muckraking Magazines
184(3)
Ida Tarbell
187(2)
Lincoln Steffens
189(1)
David Graham Phillips
190(2)
Upton Sinclair
192(3)
Muckraking's Impact
195(2)
The Death of Muckraking
197(1)
Digests and Newsmagazines
197(8)
The Birth of Public Relations
205(4)
Ivy Lee
209(2)
Edward L. Bernays
211(2)
Expansion of Corporate Public Relations
213(1)
Conclusion
214
Media Profile: Upton Sinclair
194(6)
Media Profile: Margaret Bourke-White
200(6)
Media Profile: P. T. Barnum
206(11)
IV 1900--1950 MEDIA PROMISES IN A TECHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY
217(94)
American Film
219(26)
Motion Picture Experimentation
220(3)
Story-Telling Motion Pictures
223(1)
D. W. Griffith and the Art of Filmmaking
224(2)
Mack Sennett Defines Film Comedy
226(1)
Hollywood
227(2)
Economic Expansion of the Motion Picture Business
229(1)
Film as a Social and Political Power
230(2)
Sound Motion Pictures
232(2)
Period Films Reflect Politics and Society
234(1)
Challenges to the Motion Picture Industry
235(9)
Conclusion
244
Media Profile: Thomas Ince
228(8)
Media Profile: Louis B. Mayer
236(9)
Radio and Its Promises
245(32)
Scientific Achievements and the Rise of Communications Giants
246(8)
Radio Stations
254(2)
Radio Financing
256(1)
Formation of the Networks
256(3)
Radio Programming
259(2)
Political Broadcasting
261(4)
World War II and Radio Broadcasting
265(3)
Regulation of Radio Broadcasting
268(4)
Radio Broadcasting in Transition
272(1)
Talk, Talk, Talk
273(1)
Social and Political Impact of Radio
274(1)
Conclusion
275
Media Profile: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt
262(4)
Media Profile: Ernie Pyle
266(11)
Television: Progress and Problems
277(34)
Early TV Inventors
278(1)
Zworykin, Sarnoff, and Farnsworth
279(3)
Television Arrives
282(1)
Postwar Television
282(1)
The Color War
283(2)
Early TV Entertainment
285(2)
Quiz Show Scandals
287(3)
Television News
290(1)
Edward R. Murrow
291(10)
60 Minutes
301(4)
TV News Expands
305(1)
The Media and Civil Rights
306(2)
Conclusion
308
Media Profile: Walter Cronkite
302(2)
Media Profile: Barbara Walters
304(7)
V 1950--PRESENT MEDIA CHALLENGES IN A CHANGING WORLD
311(64)
Advertising as a Social and Political Force
313(23)
A Special Rhetoric
314(1)
Early American Advertising
315(3)
The Development of the Advertising Agency
318(2)
Ethical Considerations
320(3)
Evolution of Advertising Copywriting
323(6)
Advertising as a Social Force
329(3)
Advertising as a Political Force
332(1)
Television
333(1)
Conclusion
334
Media Profile: Mary Wells Lawrence
330(6)
The Media and National Crises
336(39)
Journalists' Changing Values
337(1)
Vietnam
338(6)
Watergate
344(1)
The ``Pentagon Papers''
345(1)
The Break-in
346(1)
The Cover-up
347(2)
Nixon and the Press
349(3)
The Post-Watergate Pardon
352(2)
Middle East Crisis
354(1)
The Iran Crisis
355(2)
America's New Dawn---Or So the Ads Said
357(2)
The Struggle for Access
359(2)
Grenada and Press Control
361(1)
Iran-Contra Scandal
362(1)
``The New World Order''
363(2)
The Gulf War and Press Access
365(1)
Tabloidization of the Media
366(3)
``A New Kind of Enemy''
369(2)
Embedded Reporters in Iraq
371(2)
Conclusion
373
Media Profile: Helen Thomas
350(8)
Media Profile: I. F. Stone
358(17)
Endnotes 375(26)
Annotated Bibliography 401
Index


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