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American Music : A Panorama, Concise Edition,9780028646145

American Music : A Panorama, Concise Edition

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780028646145

ISBN10:
0028646142
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
2/1/1998
Publisher(s):
Schirmer
List Price: $40.33
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Summary

This best-selling survey text describes American music as a collection of distinct strains of music--including popular, folk, sacred, classical, blues, jazz, and rock music - that have evolved into a musical panorama reflecting the nation's unique character. By comparing and contrasting America's musical styles across regions and time periods, Kingman delivers a clear vision of American music that encompasses the historical sources of all American music, the ways in which diverse styles have influenced each other, and the cultural contributions of America's innovative and original composers.

Author Biography

Daniel Kingman is a professor emeritus of music at California State University, Sacramento. He is a well-known authority on American music.

Table of Contents

AUTHOR'S GUIDE TO THE CONCISE EDITION xi
PART ONE. Folk and Ethnic Musics 3(74)
Chapter 1. The Anglo-American Tradition
3(17)
"Barbara Allen" as a Prototype of the Anglo-American Ballad
3(2)
Print and the Ballad
5(1)
Imported versus Native Ballads
6(1)
The Music of the Ballads
7(2)
Fiddle Tunes
9(3)
Folk Music as an Instrument of Persuasion in the Twentieth Century
12(8)
Chapter 2. The African-American Tradition
20(20)
African Music and Its Relation to Black Music in America
20(1)
Religious Folk Music: The Spiritual
21(6)
Secular Folk Music
27(13)
Chapter 3. The American Indian Tradition
40(13)
Music in Aboriginal Indian Life
41(5)
Characteristics of Indian Music
46(1)
Indian Music and Acculturation
47(6)
Chapter 4. The Latino Tradition
53(24)
Sacred Music from Mexico
53(3)
Secular Music from Mexico
56(11)
Music from the Caribbean and South America
67(10)
PART TWO. Three Prodigious Offspring of the Rural South 77(62)
Chapter 5. Country Music
77(23)
Enduring Characteristics of the Music
77(4)
Enduring Characteristics of the Words
81(3)
Commercial Beginnings: Early Recordings, Radio, and the First Stars
84(3)
The West: The Cowboy Image
87(1)
The West: Realism and Eclecticism
88(1)
Postwar Dissemination and Full-Scale Commercialization
89(4)
The Persistence and Revival of Traditional Styles
93(7)
Chapter 6. Blues and Soul: From Country to City
100(14)
Early Published Blues
100(2)
Classic City Blues
102(2)
Blues and Jazz
104(1)
Boogie-Woogie
105(1)
The Absorption of Country Blues into Popular Music
106(3)
The Soul Synthesis
109(1)
Blues in the 1990s
110(4)
Chapter 7. Rock and Its Progeny
114(25)
Characteristics of the Music
114(3)
Characteristics of the Words
117(5)
A Brief History of Rock's Times and Styles
122(17)
PART THREE. Popular Sacred Music 139(42)
Chapter 8. From Psalm Tune to Rural Revivalism
139(22)
Psalmody in America
139(3)
The Singing-School Tradition
142(6)
The Frontier and Rural America in the Nineteenth Century
148(8)
Music Among Our Smaller Independent Sects
156(5)
Chapter 9. Urban Revivalism and Gospel Music
161(20)
Urban Revivalism After the Civil War: The Moody-Sankey Era of Gospel Hymns
161(2)
The Billy Sunday-Homer Rodeheaver Era: Further Popularization
163(3)
Gospel Music After the Advent of Radio and Recordings
166(15)
PART FOUR. Popular Secular Music 181(62)
Chapter 10. Secular Music in the Cities from Colonial Times to the Jacksonian Era
181(13)
Concerts and Dances
181(3)
Bands and Military Music
184(2)
Musical Theater
186(3)
Popular Song
189(5)
Chapter 11. Popular Musical Theatre from the Jacksonian Era to the Present
194(23)
Minstrelsy and Musical Entertainment Before the Civil War
194(6)
From the Civil War Through the Turn of the Century
200(3)
The First Half of the Twentieth Century
203(7)
The Musical Since the Advent of Rock
210(7)
Chapter 12. Popular Song, Dance, and March Music from the Jacksonian Era to the Advent of Rock
217(26)
Popular Song from the 1830s Through the Civil War
217(7)
Popular Song from the Civil War Through the Ragtime Era
224(6)
The Band in America After the Jacksonian Era
230(4)
Popular Song from Ragtime to Rock
234(1)
Tin Pan Alley and Its Relation to Jazz and Black Vernacular Music
235(8)
PART FIVE. Jazz and Its Forerunners 243(44)
Chapter 13. Ragtime and Pre-Jazz
243(18)
The Context of Ragtime from Its Origins to Its Zenith
243(3)
The Musical Characteristics of Ragtime
246(4)
The Decline and Dispersion of Ragtime
250(3)
The Ragtime Revival
253(1)
Pre-Jazz
254(7)
Chapter 14. Jazz
261(26)
The New Orleans Style: The Traditional Jazz of the Early Recordings
261(2)
Dissemination and Change: The Pre-Swing Era
263(4)
The Swing Era and the Big Bands
267(4)
The Emergence of Modren Jazz: Bop as a Turning Point
271(6)
The Pluralism of the Last Quarter Century
277(10)
PART SIX. Classical Music 287(106)
Chapter 15. Laying the Foundation: Accomplishments from the Jacksonian Era to World War I
287(21)
1830-1865: Education and Reform in a Time of Expansion
288(1)
Outspoken "Nativists" of the Mid-Nineteenth Century
289(5)
Louis Moreau Gottschalk and the Virtuoso in Nineteenth-Century America
294(2)
After the Civil War: The Pursuit of Culture in a Time of Industrialization
296(2)
The Second New England School
298(2)
Five Individualists Around the Turn of the Century
300(8)
Chapter 16. The Evolving Tradition, 1920-1970
308(21)
Some Background for the "Fervent Years"
308(4)
Music with Film
312(3)
Music with Dance
315(3)
Music with Poetry
318(3)
Music Independent of Film, Dance, or Poetry
321(8)
Chapter 17. Modernism I: New Ways with Old Tools
329(23)
Charles Ives (1874-1954)
329(10)
Henry Cowell (1897-1965)
339(3)
Lou Harrison and John Cage
342(1)
Harry Partch (1901-74)
343(3)
Edgard Varese (1883-1965)
346(6)
Chapter 18. Modernism II: The Impact of Technology and New Esthetic Concepts
352(16)
The Surface Features of Mid-Century Modernism
352(3)
The Two Dominant Rationales of Mid-Century Modernism
355(4)
New Technology and the New Music
359(2)
Other Aspects of Mid-Century Modernism
361(7)
Chapter 19. Modernism Transcended: Autonomy, Assimilation, and Accessibility
368(12)
Minimalism: A Radical Antidote to Modernism
369(4)
Modernism Gives Way to Assimilation and Reconnection
373(2)
Music of Association and the New Accessibility
375(5)
Chapter 20. Opera Old and New
380(13)
Opera in America before the 1930s: An Unassimilated Alien
380(1)
Traditional American Opera Beginning in the 1930s
380(5)
New Opera in the Last Quarter of the Century
385(8)
PART SEVEN. Regionalism and Diversity 393(16)
Chapter 21. Three Regional Samplings
393(16)
Louisiana and the French Influence
393(5)
The Upper Midwest and the Scandinavian Influence
398(3)
The Sacramento Valley: A Rich Mix of Cultures
401(8)
INDEX 409


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