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American Music : A Panorama, Concise Edition,9780534598327
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American Music : A Panorama, Concise Edition

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780534598327

ISBN10:
0534598323
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
12/2/2002
Publisher(s):
Schirmer
List Price: $63.67
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Summary

This best-selling survey text describes American music as a collection of distinct strains of music--including popular, folk, sacred, classical, blues, jazz, and rock music - that have evolved into a musical panorama reflecting the nation's unique character. By comparing and contrasting America's musical styles across regions and time periods, Kingman delivers a clear vision of American music that encompasses the historical sources of all American music, the ways in which diverse styles have influenced each other, and the cultural contributions of America's innovative and original composers.

Author Biography

Daniel Kingman is a professor emeritus of music at California State University, Sacramento. He is a well-known authority on American music.

Table of Contents

Author's Guide to the Panorama xii
PART I FOLK AND ETHNIC MUSICS
The Anglo-Celtic-American Tradition
1(17)
Imported Ballads
2(2)
``Barbara Allen''
2(2)
Features Common to Most Ballads
4(3)
``Barbara Allen''
5(2)
Naturalized Ballads
7(2)
``Gypsy Davy''
7(2)
Native Ballads
9(2)
``John Hardy''
9(2)
``Tom Joad''
11(1)
Print and the Ballad
11(1)
Other Aspects of the Ballad
12(1)
Fiddle Tunes
13(3)
``Soldier's Joy''
14(2)
Play-Party Songs or Games
16(2)
``Old Man at the Mill''
16(2)
Projects
18(1)
Additional Listening
18(1)
The African American Tradition
18(17)
African Music and Its Relation to Black Music in America
18(2)
``Music in Praise of a Yoruban Chief''
19(1)
Religious Folk Music: The Spiritual
20(8)
``Sheep, Sheep, Don't You Know the Road''
20(1)
``Low Down the Chariot and Let Me Ride''
21(3)
``Jacob's Ladder''
24(4)
Secular Folk Music
28(6)
``Quittin' Time Song''
28(2)
``I Don't Mind the Weather''
30(1)
``Hammer Ring''
31(1)
``John Henry''
31(3)
Projects
34(1)
Additional Listening
34(1)
The American Indian Tradition
35(14)
Music in Aboriginal Indian Life
36(2)
Concreteness and Efficacy of Songs
38(1)
``Real'' Songs and Songs for Recreation
38(1)
Types of Songs According to Purpose
39(4)
``Pigeon's Dream Song''
39(1)
``Cherokee/Creek Stomp Dance''
40(1)
``Butterfly Dance''
40(1)
``Gambling Song''
41(1)
``Sioux Love Song''
41(1)
``Corn-Grinding Song''
42(1)
``Rabbit Dance''
43(1)
Characteristics of Indian Music
43(1)
Indian Music and Acculturation
44(4)
``Ghost Dance Song''
45(1)
``Peyote Song''
46(1)
``Enis Special''
47(1)
``Contest Song for Fancy Dancers''
47(1)
Two World Concerto, ``Spirit Call''
48(1)
Projects
48(1)
Additional Listening
49(1)
The Hispanic and Latin Traditions
49(31)
The Hispanic Tradition
50(1)
Sacred Music From Mexico
50(4)
``Al Pie de Este Santo Altar''
51(1)
Las Posadas
52(2)
Secular Music From Mexico
54(15)
``El Chotis''
55(2)
``Las Abajenas''
57(4)
``El Corrido de Gregorio Cortez''
61(3)
``Mal Hombre''
64(5)
The Latin Tradition
69(10)
``Borinquen'' (excerpt)
69(3)
``Para Los Rumberos''
72(1)
``La Polemica''
73(1)
``Fuego en el 23''
73(6)
Projects
79(1)
Additional Listening
80(1)
Other Traditions: French, Scandinavian, Asian
80(16)
Louisiana and the French Influence
80(6)
``Sept ans sur mer''
82(1)
``J'ai passe devant ta porte''
83(1)
``Le Two-Step a Midland''
84(2)
African American Music of Louisiana
86(2)
``Zydeco sont pas sale''
88(1)
The Upper Midwest and the Scandinavian Influence
88(3)
``Hejsan Grabbar''
89(1)
``Drømmen om Elin''
89(1)
``Banjo, Old Time''
89(1)
``Nikolina''
90(1)
The Asian Influence
91(4)
Threnody for Carlos Chavez
94(1)
``Tampopo''
95(1)
Projects
95(1)
Additional Listening
96(1)
Folk Music as an Instrument of Advocacy
96(11)
``The Farmer Is the Man That Feeds Them All''
97(1)
The Urban Folk-Song Movement of the 1930s and 1940s
98(3)
``I Am a Union Woman''
98(2)
``Pittsburgh''
100(1)
Protest and Folk Song in the 1960s
101(2)
Freedom Songs, and the Civil Rights Movement in the South
103(1)
``Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around''
103(1)
``We Shall Overcome''
103(1)
Continuity and Change in the Folk Style of Advocacy from the 1970s to the 2000s
104(1)
``Gonna Be an Engineer''
104(1)
Projects
105(1)
Additional Listening
105(2)
PART II THREE PRODIGIOUS OFFSPRING OF THE RURAL SOUTH
Country Music
107(21)
Enduring Characteristics of the Words
108(2)
Enduring Characteristics of the Music
110(4)
``Wayfaring Stranger''
111(1)
``Wildwood Flower''
112(1)
``Wabash Cannon Ball''
113(1)
Commercial Beginnings: Early Recordings, Radio, and the First Stars
114(2)
``Mule Skinner Blues''
116(1)
The West: The Cowboy Image
116(2)
The West: Realism and Eclecticism
118(1)
``Cotton Eyed Joe''
119(1)
Postwar Dissemination and Full-Scale Commercialization
119(5)
``I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry''
120(1)
``I'm Blue Again''
121(3)
The Persistence and Revival of Traditional Styles
124(3)
``Muleskinner Blues''
125(1)
``John Henry''
125(2)
Projects
127(1)
Additional Listening
127(1)
Blues and Soul: From Country to City
128(17)
The Spiritual and the Blues
128(1)
Blues Subjects
129(2)
The form and Music of the Blues
131(3)
``Levee Camp Moan''
131(1)
``Weary Worried Blues''
132(2)
Early Published Blues
134(1)
Classic Blues
135(3)
``Countin' the Blues''
137(1)
``Mama's Got the Blues''
138(1)
Blues and Jazz
138(1)
Boogie-Woogie
139(1)
``Mr. Freddie Blues''
140(1)
The Absorption of Country Blues into Popular Music
140(1)
Urban Blues
141(2)
The Soul Synthesis
143(1)
``Sweet Little Angel''
143(1)
Blues at the Turn of the Century
144(1)
Projects
145(1)
Additional Listening
145(1)
Rock: A Panorama in Itself
145(29)
Characteristics of the Words
147(6)
Characteristics of the Music
153(4)
A Brief History of Rock's Times and Styles
157(12)
``Good Rockin' Tonight''
158(1)
``Hound Dog''
158(4)
``Cold Sweat''
162(1)
``You Can't Hurry Love''
162(7)
Projects
169(1)
Additional Listening
170(4)
PART III POPULAR SACRED MUSIC
From Psalm Tune to Rural Revivalism
174(21)
Psalmody in America
174(4)
Psalm 56, verse 12
177(1)
``Amazing Grace''
178(1)
The Singing-School Tradition
178(7)
``Chester''
181(2)
``Jesus Wept''
183(1)
``Amity''
183(2)
The Frontier and Rural America in the Nineteenth Century
185(8)
``Wondrous Love''
187(6)
Music Among Smaller Independent American Sects
193(1)
``'Tis the Gift to Be Simple''
194(1)
Projects
194(1)
Additional Listening
195(1)
Urban Revivalism and Gospel Music
195(23)
Urban Revivalism After the Civil War: The Moody-Sankey Era of Gospel Hymns
196(4)
``Sweet By-and-By'' (two versions)
197, 199(199)
``Can the Circle Be Unbroken''
199(1)
The Billy Sunday-Homer Rodeheaver Era: Further Popularization
200(1)
``Brighten the Corner Where You Are''
200(1)
Gospel Music After the Advent of Radio and Recordings
201(13)
``Give the World a Smile''
202(5)
``I'm on the Battlefield for My Lord''
207(1)
``He Got Better Things for You''
208(1)
``Didn't It Rain''
209(1)
``Swing Down Chariot''
210(1)
``I Feel the Spirit''
211(3)
Projects
214(1)
Additional Listening
214(4)
PART IV POPULAR SECULAR MUSIC
Secular Music in the Cities from Colonial Times to the Jacksonian Era
218(12)
Concerts and Dances
218(4)
``College Hornpipe''
219(3)
Bands and Military Music
222(2)
``Lady Hope's Reel''
222(1)
``Washington's March''
222(2)
Musical Theater
224(3)
``Chorus of Adventurers,'' The Indian Princess
225(2)
Popular Song
227(2)
``Junto Song''
228(1)
Projects
229(1)
Additional Listening
230(1)
Popular Musical Theater from the Jacksonian Era to the Present
230(30)
Minstrelsy and Musical Entertainment Before the Civil War
231(8)
``De Boatman's Dance''
236(3)
From the Civil War through The Turn of the Century
239(5)
``The Babies on Our Block''
241(2)
``The Yankee Doodle Boy''
243(1)
The First Half of the Twentieth Century
244(2)
The Musical in its Maturity: Show Boat to West Side Story
246(9)
``Can't Help Lovin' That Man''
247(3)
``Glamour Dream,'' Lady in the Dark
250(1)
``Childhood Dream: My Ship,'' Lady in the Dark
250(2)
``Fugue for Tinhorns''
252(2)
``Great Fugue'' String Quartet Op. 133 (Beethoven)
254(1)
``Cool,'' West Side Story
254(1)
``Tonight,'' West Side Story
254(1)
The Musical Since the Advent of Rock
255(4)
Projects
259(1)
Additional Listening
260(1)
Popular Song, Dance, and March Music from the Jacksonian Era to the Advent of Rock
260(27)
Popular Song from the 1830s Through the Civil War
260(10)
``Woodman! Spare That Tree!''
263(1)
``Get Off the Track!''
264(2)
``Hard Times Come Again No More''
266(2)
``The Battle Cry of Freedom''
268(1)
``All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight''
269(1)
``Kingdom Coming''
269(1)
Popular Song from the Civil War through the Ragtime Era
270(7)
``My Gal Sal''
274(3)
The Band in America after the Jacksonian Era
277(4)
Popular Song from Ragtime to Rock
281(2)
``Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?''
282(1)
``You Go to My Head''
283(1)
Tin Pan Alley and its Relation to Jazz and Black Vernacular Music
283(2)
``Blues in the Night''
285(1)
Projects
285(1)
Additional Listening
285(2)
PART V JAZZ AND ITS FORERUNNERS
Ragtime and Pre-Jazz
287(17)
The Context of Ragtime from its Origins to its Zenith
287(5)
``Hello! Ma Baby''
287(2)
``Solace---A Mexican Serenade''
289(3)
``St. Louis Tickle''
292(1)
``Dill Pickles Rag''
292(1)
``At a Georgia Camp Meeting''
292(1)
The Musical Characteristics of Ragtime
292(5)
``Maple Leaf Rag''
296(1)
``The Washington Post''
296(1)
The Decline and Dispersion of Ragtime
297(2)
``If Dreams Come True''
298(1)
The Ragtime Revival
299(1)
Pre-Jazz
300(3)
``Eternity''
303(1)
``Just a Little While to Stay Here''
303(1)
Projects
303(1)
Additional Listening
304(1)
Jazz
304(29)
The New Orleans Style: The Traditional Jazz of the Early Recordings
304(5)
``Dippermouth Blues''
306(3)
``Hotter Than That''
309(1)
Dissemination and Change: The Pre-Swing Era
309(2)
The Swing Era and the Big Bands
311(8)
``Ko-ko''
314(1)
``Taxi War Dance''
314(2)
``Sugar Foot Stomp''
316(3)
The Emergence of Modern Jazz: Bop as a Turning Point
319(6)
``Criss-Cross''
321(2)
``Out of This World''
323(2)
The Pluralism of the Last Quarter-Century
325(4)
``Bitches Brew''
325(2)
``Skain's Domain''
327(2)
Projects
329(1)
Additional Listening
329(4)
PART VI CLASSICAL MUSIC
Classical Music and the Contemporary World
333(6)
St. Louis, Missouri
334(1)
The Bushy Wushy Rag
334(1)
The San Francsico Bay Area, California
335(1)
The Navigator Tree
335(1)
Grand Forks, North Dakota
335(2)
``Red River, remember me,'' What the River Says
335(2)
Madison County, Mississippi
337(1)
``And We Ride ... (#4),'' Traces of Mississippi
337(1)
Projects
338(1)
Active Listening
338(1)
Accomplishments from the Jacksonian Era to World War I
339(17)
Louis Moreau Gottschalk and the Virtuoso in Nineteenth Century America
340(3)
``The Banjo''
340(3)
1830-1865: Education and Reform in a Time of Expansion
343(2)
``But See! In the West a Cloud Appears,'' The Haymakers
344(1)
Outspoken ``Nativists'' of the Mid-Nineteenth Century and the Debate Over Nationality
345(1)
After the Civil War: The Pursuit of Culture in a Time of Industrialization
346(1)
The Second New England School
347(4)
``Hobgoblin,'' Symphonic Sketches
349(2)
Five Individualists Around the Turn of the Century
351(4)
Conclusion
355(1)
Projects
355(1)
Additional Listening
356(1)
The Evolving Tradition, 1920-70
356(23)
Some Background for the ``Fervent Years''
357(4)
Music with Film
361(1)
Music with Dance
362(4)
``Street in a Frontier Town,'' Billy the Kid
363(3)
Music with Poetry
366(4)
``A Black Pierrot''
367(1)
``Heavenly Grass,'' Blue Mountain Ballads
368(2)
Music Independent of Film, Dance, or Poetry
370(6)
Third Symphony (Harris)
371(5)
Projects
376(1)
Additional Listening
377(2)
Twentieth-Century Innovation
379(42)
Charles Ives (1874--1954)
379(11)
``The Cage,'' Charles Ives
382(1)
General William Booth Enters into Heaven
383(7)
Carl Ruggles (1876-1971)
390(2)
New York and Europe-Related ``Futurism'' and ``Modernism''
392(1)
Edgard Varese (1883--1965)
392(3)
Hyperprism
393(2)
Ruth Crawford (Seeger) (1901--53)
395(1)
The West: Cowell, Harrison, Cage, and Partch
396(10)
The Banshee (Cowell)
398(2)
Studies for Player Piano
400(2)
``Sonata V,'' Sonatas and Interludes for Prepared Piano (Cage)
402(1)
The Letter (Partch)
403(3)
Midcentury Modernism
406(3)
Phonenema (Babbitt) (two realizations)
406(3)
The Two Dominant Rationales of Midcentury Modernism
409(6)
New Technology and the New Music
415(1)
Other Aspects of Midcentury Modernism
416(3)
Projects
419(1)
Additional Listening
419(2)
Toward a More Hospitable Music
421(12)
Minimalism: A Radical Antidote to Modernism
422(5)
``Violin Solo Music,'' Einstein on the Beach (Glass)
425(1)
Tehillim, Part I (Reich)
426(1)
Modernism Gives Way to Assimilation and Reconnection
427(2)
``1 after Marc-Antoine Charpentier,'' Prism (Druckman)
428(1)
Music with Associative Connotations
429(3)
``Way to Go,'' Passages (Zwilich)
431(1)
Projects
432(1)
Additional Listening
432(1)
Opera
433(16)
Opera in America Before the 1930s: An Unassimilated Alien
434(1)
Traditional American Opera Beginning in the 1930s
435(1)
Three Landmarks of the 1930s
435(4)
``I've Got a Ram Goliath,'' The Devil and Daniel Webster (Moore)
435(3)
``Pigeons on the Grass Alas,'' Four Saints in Three Acts (Thomson)
438(1)
American Opera in Relation to American Culture After the 1930s
439(2)
New Opera in the Last Quarter of the Century
441(6)
``Choosing Companions,'' Atlas (Monk)
444(1)
Eric Hermannson's Soul (Larsen)
445(2)
Projects
447(1)
Additional Listening
448(1)
POST-CHAPTER American Music in Your Own Backyard 449(8)
The Sacramento Valley: A Rich Mix of Cultures
450(5)
``Hokkai bon uta''
452(2)
``Zelenyi Dubochku''
454(1)
``Chy Ya Tobi Ne Kazala''
454(1)
Conclusion
455(1)
Projects
455(2)
References 457(8)
Additional Reading 465(6)
Glossary 471(4)
Index 475


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