9780809322497

Amid the Fall, Dreaming of Eden: Du Bois, King, Malcolm X, and Emancipatory Composition

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780809322497

  • ISBN10:

    0809322498

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1999-11-01
  • Publisher: Southern Illinois Univ Pr
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Summary

Whom, or what, does composition--defined here as an intentional process of study, either oral or written--serve? Bradford T. Stull contends that composition would do well to articulate, in theory and practice, what could be called "emancipatory composition." He argues that emancipatory composition is radically theopolitical: it roots itself in the foundational theological and political language of the American experience while it subverts this language in order to emancipate the oppressed and, thereby, the oppressors.To articulate this vision, Stull looks to those who compose from an oppressed place, finding in the works of W. E. B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King Jr., and Malcolm X radical theopolitical practices that can serve as a model for emancipatory composition. While Stull acknowledges that there are many sites of oppression, he focuses on what Du Bois has called the problem of the twentieth century: the color line, positing that the unique and foundational nature of the color line provides a fecund place in which, from which, a theory and practice of emancipatory composition might be elucidated.By focusing on four key theopolitical tropes--The Fall, The Orient, Africa, and Eden--that inform the work of Du Bois, King, and Malcolm X, Stull discovers the ways in which these civil rights leaders root themselves in the vocabulary of the American experience in order to subvert it so that they might promote emancipation for African Americans, and thus all Americans.In drawing on the work of Paulo Freire, Kenneth Burke, Edward Said, Christopher Miller, Ernst Bloch, and others, Stull also locates this study within the larger cultural context. By reading Du Bois, King, and Malcolm X together in a way that they have never before been read, Stull presents a new vision of composition practice to the African American studies community and a reading of African American emancipatory composition to the rhetoric and composition community, thus extending the question of emancipatory composition into new territory.

Author Biography

Bradford T. Stull is an assistant professor in the Department of English and Communications at Rivier College in Nashua, New Hampshire. He is the author of Religious Dialectics of Pain and Imagination.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Acknowledgments xi
Emancipatory Composition
1(20)
The Theoretical Tradition
4(6)
Composition from the Color Line
10(4)
Du Bois, King, Malcolm X
14(3)
Theopolitical Tropes
17(4)
The Fall
21(27)
Babel
25(13)
Division of Property
38(6)
Violence
44(4)
The Orient
48(26)
Yellow, Alien Other
54(10)
Wise Person
64(3)
Backward Place
67(7)
Africa
74(25)
Africa as Suffering
81(9)
Africa as Monstrous/Noble
90(9)
Eden
99(21)
Malcolm X
103(3)
Du Bois
106(8)
King
114(6)
Conclusion
120(9)
Notes 129(10)
Works Cited 139(4)
Index 143

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