CART

(0) items

Analyzing Social Settings A Guide to Qualitative Observation and Analysis,9780534528614
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Analyzing Social Settings A Guide to Qualitative Observation and Analysis

by ; ; ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780534528614

ISBN10:
0534528619
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/18/2005
Publisher(s):
Cengage Learning

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 8/18/2005.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Related Products


  • Analyzing Social Settings : A Guide to Qualitative Observation and Analysis
    Analyzing Social Settings : A Guide to Qualitative Observation and Analysis





Summary

This comprehensive guide takes a 'how-to' approach to qualitative data collection and analysis. Drawing from a wealth of illustrative research examples and applications, the authors introduce techniques of collecting, focusing, and analyzing data in a step-by-step manner. First published in 1971, this book has become the field manual for any student doing social science fieldwork.

Table of Contents

List of Figures xvii
Preface to the Fourth Edition xix
Acknowledgments xxi
Introduction: The Aims and Organization of This Guide 1(6)
I. Three Tasks: Gathering, Focusing, and Analyzing Data
1(1)
II. Features and Aspects of Fieldstudies
2(3)
A. Gathering Data: Researcher as Witness and Instrument
3(1)
B. Focusing Data: Social Science Guidance
4(1)
C. Analyzing Data: Emergence
4(1)
III. Audiences
5(1)
IV. Yet More Labels for Fieldstudies
5(2)
PART ONE GATHERING DATA 7(112)
Chapter 1. Starting Where You Are
9(6)
I. Personal Experience and Biography
9(3)
II. Intellectual Curiosity
12(1)
III. Tradition and Justification
13(2)
Chapter 2. Evaluating Data Sites
15(18)
I. The Overall Goal
15(2)
II. Participant Observation and Intensive Interviewing
17(1)
III. Detailed Assessment of Data Sites
18(14)
A. Evaluating for Appropriateness
18(3)
B. Evaluating for Access
21(6)
1. Investigator Relationship to Setting
22(1)
2. Ascriptive Categories of Researcher and Researched
23(2)
3. Difficult Settings
25(2)
C. Evaluating for Physical and Emotional Risks
27(1)
D. Evaluating for Ethics
28(2)
E. Evaluating for Personal Consequences
30(2)
IV. A Concluding Word of Caution
32(1)
Chapter 3. Getting In
33(21)
I. Types of Settings
34(1)
II. The Unknown Investigator
35(5)
A. Public and Quasi-Public Settings
36(1)
B. Private and Quasi-Private Settings
37(3)
III. The Known Investigator
40(7)
A. The "Insider" Participant Researcher Role
41(1)
B. The "Outsider" Participant Researcher Role
41(13)
1. Connections
41(2)
2. Accounts
43(1)
a. Content
43(1)
b. Timing
45(1)
c. Form
45(1)
d. Audience/Targets
46(1)
3. Knowledge
46(1)
4. Courtesy
47(1)
IV. Political, Legal, and Bureaucratic Barriers
47(4)
V. The Question of Confidentiality
51(3)
Chapter 4. Getting Along
54(27)
I. Getting Along with Self: Emotional and Physical Challenges
54(12)
A. Information Overload
55(1)
B. Deception and the Fear of Disclosure
56(1)
C. Distance and Surrender
57(6)
1. Loathing
58(1)
2. Marginalization
59(2)
3. Sympathy
61(1)
4. Identification
62(1)
D. Physical Dangers
63(2)
E. Dealing with the Challenges
65(1)
II. Getting Along with Members: The Problems of Developing and Maintaining Field Relations
66(9)
A. Strategies to Facilitate the Development and Maintenance of Field Relations
67(5)
1. Presentational Strategies
68(1)
a. Nonthreatening Demeanor
68(1)
b. Acceptable Incompetence
69(1)
c. Selective Competence
70(1)
2. Exchange Strategies
71(1)
B. Strategies to Control Relational Closeness
72(12)
1. Preempting
73(1)
2. Finessing
74(1)
3. Declining and Withdrawing
75(1)
III. Getting Along While Getting Out
75(3)
IV. Getting Along with Claimants and Conscience: Ongoing Ethical Concerns
78(1)
V. Postscript: Personal Accounts of the Field Experience
79(2)
Chapter 5. Logging Data
81(38)
I. Data: Fact or Fiction?
82(2)
II. The Logging Task
84(15)
A. Data Sources
85(5)
1. Direct Experience
85(1)
2. Social Action
85(2)
3. Talk
87(1)
4. Supplementary Data
88(1)
a. Archival Records
89(1)
b. Physical Traces
89(1)
c. Photographic Data
90(1)
B. Problems of Error and Bias
90(5)
1. Types of Error and Bias
91(1)
a. Reactive Effects
91(1)
b. Perceptual and Interpretive Distortions
91(1)
c. Sampling Errors
91(1)
2. Measures to Control Error and Bias
91(1)
a. Sampling Strategies
91(1)
b. Team Research
93(1)
c. Strategic Selection of Informants
93(1)
d. Member Checking
94(1)
C. The Mechanics of Logging
95(3)
D. Protecting Confidentiality
98(1)
III. Data Logging in Intensive Interviewing: Guides and Write-Ups
99(9)
A. Preparing the Interview Guide
99(5)
1. Puzzlements and Jottings
99(1)
2. Global Sorting and Ordering
100(1)
3. Section Sorting and Ordering
101(1)
4. Probes
102(1)
5. Facesheets and Fieldnotes
103(1)
B. Doing the Interview
104(3)
1. Introduction
104(1)
2. Flexible Format
105(1)
3. Ineffective Questions
105(1)
4. Attending, Thinking, Taking Notes, Taping
106(1)
5. Separate Forms
107(1)
C. Writing Up the Interview
107(1)
IV. Data Logging in Observation: Fieldnotes
108(8)
A. Mental Notes
109(1)
B. Jotted Notes
109(1)
C. Full Fieldnotes
110(12)
1. Mechanics
110(2)
2. Contents
112(1)
a. Be Concrete
112(1)
b. Distinguish Notationally Among Member Comments
113(1)
c. Record Recalled Information
113(1)
d. Include Analytic Ideas and Hunches
113(1)
e. Record Personal Impressions and Feelings
114(1)
f. Reminders
115(1)
3. Style
115(1)
V Interview Write-Ups and Fieldnotes as Compulsion
116(3)
PART TWO FOCUSING DATA 119(74)
Chapter 6. Thinking Topics
121(23)
I. Units and Aspects Combine into Topics
121(1)
II. Units
122(10)
A. Practices
123(1)
B. Episodes
124(1)
C. Encounters
124(1)
D. Roles and Social Types
125(1)
1. Roles
125(1)
2. Social Types
126(1)
E. Social and Personal Relationships
126(1)
F. Groups and Cliques
127(1)
G. Organizations
128(1)
H. Settlements and Habitats
129(2)
I. Subcultures and Lifestyles
131(1)
III. Aspects and Topics
132(9)
A. Cognitive Aspects or Meanings
132(4)
1. Ideologies (and Kindred Concepts) as Meanings
133(1)
2. Rules as Meanings
134(1)
3. Self-Concepts and Identities as Meanings
135(1)
B. Emotional Aspects or Feelings
136(3)
1. Emotion and Practices, Episodes, and Encounters
136(1)
2. Emotion and Roles
137(1)
3. Emotion and Organizations
138(1)
C. Hierarchical Aspects or Inequalities
139(6)
1. Hierarchy in Encounters
139(1)
2. Hierarchy in Roles and Relationships
140(1)
3. Hierarchy in Groups
141(1)
IV. Two or More Units or Aspects as Topics
141(2)
V. Units, Aspects, and Topics Form a Mind-Set for Coding
143(1)
Chapter 7. Asking Questions
144(24)
I. What Are the Topic's Types?
145(4)
A. Single Types
146(1)
B. Multiple Types and Taxonomies
146(2)
C. Typologizing
148(1)
D. Sources and Rules of Typing and Typologizing
149(1)
II. What Are the Topic's Frequencies?
149(2)
III. What Are the Topic's Magnitudes?
151(1)
IV. What Are the Topic's Structures?
151(1)
V. What Are the Topic's Processes?
152(4)
A. Cycles
152(1)
B. Spirals
153(1)
C. Sequences
154(2)
1. Tracing Back
154(1)
2. Tracing Forward
155(1)
3. Turning Points
155(1)
VI. What Are the Topic's Causes?
156(6)
A. Requirements of Causal Explanation
157(1)
B. Selected Models of Causal Explanation
157(1)
1. Experimental Model
157(1)
2. Statistical Model
158(1)
3. Contextual Model
158(1)
4. Case Comparative Model
158(1)
5. Step/Process Model
158(1)
6. Negative Case Model
158(1)
C. Clarifying the Relationship Between Qualitative Field Research and Causal Explanation
158(4)
VII. What Are the Topic's Consequences?
162(3)
A. Foreground Issues in Examining Consequences
163(1)
1. Requirements of Inferring Consequences
163(1)
2. Consequences for Whom or for What?
163(1)
3. Intentional and Unintentional Consequences
163(1)
B. Examples of the Qualitative Study of Consequences
164(1)
VIII. Where and What Is Agency?
165(3)
A. Passivist Versus Agentic Conceptions
165(1)
B. Agentic Questions
166(2)
Chapter 8. Arousing Interest
168(25)
I. Social Science Framing
169(18)
A. Trueness
169(2)
1. Theoretical Candor
170(1)
2. The Ethnographer's Path
170(1)
3. Fieldnote and Interview Transcript Evidence
170(1)
B. Newness
171(3)
1. Relating to Existing Work
171(1)
2. First Report
172(1)
3. Unusual Setting
172(1)
4. New Analytic Focus and Perspective
173(1)
C. Importance
174(13)
1. Questioning Mind-Set
174(1)
2. Propositional Framing
175(2)
3. Generic Concepts
177(1)
a. Using Existing Social Science Conceptions
177(1)
b. Discerning New Forms
178(1)
c. Using Metaphors
179(1)
d. Using Irony
180(1)
4. Developed Treatment
180(1)
a. Conceptual Elaboration
181(1)
b. Balance
183(1)
c. Interpenetration
184(1)
5. Resonating Content
185(2)
II. Social Science Value Commitments
187(2)
A. Demystification
187(1)
B. Holistic Dispassionate Understanding
188(1)
III. Other Framings
189(6)
A. Technocratic/Social Engineering Frame
190(1)
B. Liberation Frame
190(1)
C. Muckraking Frame
191(1)
D. Expressive Voicing
191(2)
PART THREE ANALYZING DATA 193(48)
Chapter 9. Developing Analysis
195(25)
I. Strategy One: Social Science Framing
197(1)
A. Eight Forms of Propositions
197(1)
B. A Third Way to Contrast Propositional with Other Writing
197(1)
C. Number of Propositions in a Single Fieldstudy
198(1)
II. Strategy Two: Normalizing and Managing Anxiety
198(2)
III. Strategy Three: Coding
200(9)
A. Two Physical Methods of Coding
203(1)
1. Filing
203(1)
2. Computer Databasing
203(1)
B. Types of Coding Files
204(5)
1. Folk/Setting-Specific Files
205(1)
2. Analytic Files
206(2)
3. Methodological/Fieldwork Files
208(1)
C. Maintaining a Chronological Record
209(1)
IV. Strategy Four: Memoing
209(3)
V. Strategy Five: Diagramming
212(5)
A. Taxonomies
212(2)
B. Matrices and Typologies
214(1)
C. Concept Charts
215(1)
D. Flow Charts
216(1)
VI. Strategy Six: Thinking Flexibly
217(3)
Chapter 10. Writing Analysis
220(21)
I. Preliminary Considerations
221(3)
A. Understanding the Social Psychological Dimensions of the Writing Process
221(2)
B. Plan Your Writing Time and Place
223(1)
II. Writing Practices
224(14)
A. Start Writing
224(1)
B. Write on Any Project Aspect, But Write
225(1)
C. Admit Aversion and Write Regularly Anyway
226(2)
D. Trust in Discovery and Surprise in Writing
228(1)
E. Do Not Seek Perfection or the One Right Way
229(1)
F. Divide and Conquer
230(1)
G. Draw on Standard Literary Organizing Devices
231(2)
H. Find Your Own Working Style
233(1)
I. Reread and Revise
233(2)
J. Seek Feedback
235(1)
K. Constrain Your Ego and Related Attachments
236(1)
L. Let It Go
237(1)
III. Concluding Observations
238(3)
A. The Fieldstudies Approach as a System of Parts
239(1)
B. The Similarity of All Scholarship
239(2)
References 241(32)
Index 273


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...