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Ancient N Amer 4E PA,9780500285329
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Ancient N Amer 4E PA

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780500285329

ISBN10:
0500285322
Format:
Trade Paper
Pub. Date:
4/17/2005
Publisher(s):
BLOOMBERG

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What version or edition is this?
This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 4/17/2005.
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Summary

Brian Fagan, one of the foremost living archaeological writers and an authority on world prehistory, has completely revised and updated his definitive synthesis of North America's ancient past. The book offers a balanced summary of every major culture area in North America, and places the continent in its wider context in human prehistory. Lavish illustrations, many new to the fourth edition, draw on North America's rich ethnographic record to illustrate key sites and artifacts. The chapter on first settlement has been heavily revised in light of new discoveries in Siberia and the Americas, and current controversies are surveyed. Chapters on archaeological theory, the Great Basin, the Northeast, the Northwest, and the Archaeology of European Contact reflect major advances, and important new discoveries and scientific methodologies receive full coverage.

Table of Contents

Preface 9(6)
PART ONE Background
15(54)
Clash of Cultures
17(16)
Norse Settlement in North America
18(4)
The Search for a Strait
22(3)
Raleigh's Virginia
25(1)
Spanish Explorations in the Southeast
26(3)
The Seven Lost Cities of Cibola
29(1)
``A Young People, Younger a Thousand Years...''
30(2)
Further Reading
32(1)
Culture History and North American Archaeology
33(20)
The First Excavation
33(1)
The Myth of the Moundbuilders
34(3)
First Descriptive Efforts
37(1)
Cushing, Bandelier, and the Southwestern Pueblos
38(1)
The Birth of Culture History
38(7)
Dating Ancient North America
45(2)
Science and Archaeology
47(1)
Method and Theory in American Archaeology
48(1)
A Study of Archaeology
48(4)
Further Reading
52(1)
North American Archaeology Since the 1960s
53(16)
Evolution, Cultural Ecology, and the Environment
53(2)
Processual Archaeology
55(2)
Ethnographic Analogy and Ethnoarchaeology
57(3)
Post-Processual Archaeology
60(2)
Cultural Resource Management
62(2)
The Theoretical Debates Continue...
64(2)
Archaeology and Native Americans
66(2)
Further Reading
68(1)
PART TWO The Paleo-Indians
69(46)
First Settlement
71(26)
Stone Age Foragers in Asia
71(4)
Sinodonts and Amerinds
75(1)
Beringia
76(3)
The Younger Dryas
79(1)
First Settlement of Alaska and the Yukon Territory
80(2)
Ice-Free Corridors and Continental Shelves
82(2)
The Case for Human Settlement Before 15,000 Years Ago
84(1)
A Scenario for First Settlement After 15,000 Years Ago
85(4)
Clovis Culture
89(4)
Clovis Contemporaries
93(2)
Paleo-Indians and Megafaunal Extinctions
95(1)
Further Reading
96(1)
Later Paleo-Indian Cultures
97(18)
After Clovis on the Plains
99(4)
Post-Clovis Material Culture on the Plains
103(2)
Culture Change on the Plains
105(1)
Paleo-Indian Occupation in the West
106(2)
Paleo-Indians in the Eastern Woodlands
108(5)
Social Organization and Settlement Patterns
113(1)
Further Reading
114(1)
PART THREE The Great Plains
115(50)
Bison Hunters on the Plains
117(25)
The Plains Environment and Climate Change
120(2)
Holocene Environmental Change
122(3)
Bison and Humans
125(1)
Plains Archaic Traditions
126(1)
Early Plains Archaic
127(2)
Middle Plains Archaic
129(2)
Late Plains Archaic on the Northwestern Plains
131(1)
Bison Jumps
132(2)
The Northeastern Plains Periphery
134(1)
Later Bison Hunters
135(2)
Protohistoric Period
137(4)
Further Reading
141(1)
Village Farmers of the Plains
142(23)
Before the Farmers
145(1)
The Plains Woodland Tradition
145(3)
Plains Village Indians
148(6)
Bundles, Chiefs, and Villages
154(2)
Origins of Historic Groups: Caddoans and Siouans
156(1)
Caddoan Speakers: Wichita and Pawnee
157(2)
Middle Missouri Valley: Arikara, Mandan, Hidatsa
159(2)
Nomads and Plains Farmers
161(3)
Further Reading
164(1)
PART FOUR The Far North
165(48)
Early Arctic Cultures
167(24)
The Arctic Environment
170(2)
The Paleo-Arctic Tradition
172(2)
Coastal Adaptations on the Pacific Coast
174(2)
The Aleutian Tradition
176(2)
Arctic Small Tool Tradition
178(3)
First Settlement of the Eastern Arctic
181(6)
Archaic Foragers in the Sub-Arctic
187(3)
Further Reading
190(1)
Norton, Dorset, and Thule
191(22)
The Norton Tradition of the Western Arctic
191(3)
The Thule Tradition
194(3)
Thule Expansion in the West
197(1)
The Dorset Tradition of the Eastern Arctic
198(3)
Evolution of the Dorset Tradition
201(2)
The Thule Expansion into the Eastern Arctic
203(4)
Classic Thule
207(3)
Postclassic Thule
210(1)
European Contact
211(1)
Further Reading
212(1)
PART FIVE The West
213(156)
Early Foragers on the West Coast
215(18)
Environmental Diversity
215(4)
Ancient Food Staples
219(2)
First Settlement of the West Coast
221(3)
Northwest Coast Early and Middle Periods
224(3)
Northern California Early Archaic
227(2)
Southern California Early Period
229(3)
Further Reading
232(1)
The Myth of the Garden of Eden: Later Societies of the West Coast
233(31)
Complex Hunter-Gatherers
233(2)
Emerging Cultural and Social Complexity on the Northwest Coast
235(7)
Late Period: Links to Historic Peoples
242(2)
The Interior Plateau
244(4)
The California Coast: Diversification and Regional Specialization
248(2)
Evolutionary Ecology and Optimal Foraging
250(2)
Climate Change: The Medieval Warm Period
252(1)
Culture History: Northern California
253(2)
Culture History: San Francisco Bay and the Central Coast
255(2)
Culture History: Southern California Coast
257(4)
Complexity and Stress
261(2)
Further Reading
263(1)
The Great Basin and Western Interior
264(31)
The Great Basin Environment
264(8)
Conceptual Frameworks
272(3)
Paleo-Indian
275(1)
Desert Archaic in the Eastern and Northern Great Basin
275(6)
Desert Archaic in the Western Great Basin and Interior California
281(8)
The Fremont Culture and Great Basin Horticulture
289(5)
Further Reading
294(1)
The Archaic of the Southwest and Lower Pecos
295(20)
Southwestern Peoples
297(2)
The Southwestern Environment
299(2)
The Basic Framework for Southwestern Archaeology
301(3)
Paleo-Indian Tradition
304(1)
Southwestern Archaic
304(3)
Southwestern Archaic Traditions
307(2)
A Population Movement and Climate Model
309(2)
Foragers to the South and East
311(2)
Historic Peoples
313(1)
Further Reading
314(1)
The Origins of Southwestern Agriculture and Village Life
315(20)
Tending, Cultivation, and Plant Domestication
315(2)
Theories of the Origins of Agriculture
317(1)
The Origins of Southwestern Agriculture
318(2)
Maize Agriculture
320(6)
The Lower Sonoran Agricultural Complex
326(1)
The Consequences of Southwestern Agriculture
327(1)
The Beginnings of Village Life in the Southwest
327(7)
Further Reading
334(1)
Villages and Pueblos
335(34)
The Chaco Phenomenon
336(11)
Hohokam
347(4)
Mesa Verde and Mimbres
351(7)
Climate Change and Risk
358(3)
Violence in Ancient Pueblo Life
361(1)
Kachinas and Warriors
361(3)
Casas Grandes
364(3)
Further Reading
367(2)
PART SIX The Eastern Woodlands
369(140)
Early and Middle Archaic Cultures in the Eastern Woodlands
371(28)
Projectile Points and the Early Archaic
373(2)
The Dalton Tradition
375(2)
Icehouse Bottom and Early Archaic Subsistence
377(3)
Corner-Notched and Bifurcate Traditions
380(3)
The Meaning of Projectile-Point Sequences
383(1)
Restricted Mobility: Early and Middle Archaic Koster
384(4)
Riverine Adaptations in the Southeast
388(1)
The Windover Site
389(1)
The Issue of Sedentism
390(1)
Identifying Sedentary Settlement
391(1)
Burials and the Lands of the Ancestors
392(2)
The Northeast: L'Anse Amour and Neville
394(4)
Further Reading
398(1)
Middle to Late Archaic Cultures in the Eastern Woodlands
399(22)
The Issue of Population Growth
399(1)
Population Growth and Sedentism
400(1)
The Shield Late Archaic
401(1)
The Maritime Tradition of the Northeast
402(3)
Lake Forest Late Archaic
405(3)
Mast Forest Late Archaic
408(2)
Central Riverine Archaic
410(4)
Exchange and Interaction
414(3)
The Poverty Point Culture
417(3)
Further Reading
420(1)
Early Woodland and the Adena Complex
421(14)
Pottery and the ``Container Revolution''
421(1)
Cultivation of Native Plants
422(5)
Early Woodland: Burial Mounds and the Adena Complex
427(5)
Inter-regional Exchange
432(2)
Further Reading
434(1)
Middle Woodland and the Hopewell
435(22)
The Hopewell Culture
435(1)
Origins
436(2)
Hopewell Exchange Systems
438(2)
Dispersed Homesteads and ``Big Men''
440(3)
Hopewell Exchange and Artifact Standardization
443(1)
Hopewell Mortuary Customs
444(4)
Interpreting Hopewell Earthworks
448(1)
Symbolic Geography
449(3)
Woodland Adaptations in the Southeast
452(2)
Mounds and ``Big Men'' in the Southeast
454(1)
The Hopewell Decline
455(1)
Further Reading
456(1)
Mississippian Climax
457(32)
The Weeden Island Culture
457(4)
Defining the Mississippian
461(3)
Subsistence
464(4)
Chiefdoms
468(2)
Mississippian Politics: Cahokia and Moundville
470(9)
Complex Chiefdoms
479(3)
Mississippian Cosmos: Fertility and Duality
482(4)
Natchez, Coosa, and the 16th Century
486(2)
Further Reading
488(1)
Algonquians and Iroquoians
489(20)
Algonquians and Iroquoians
489(1)
Terminal Archaic
490(2)
Woodland Societies in the Northeast
492(2)
Northern Iroquoian Origins
494(2)
Culture History
496(4)
Middle Iroquoian
500(5)
Late Iroquoian
505(3)
Further Reading
508(1)
PART SEVEN After Columbus
509(32)
The Archaeology of European Contact
511(30)
Disease and Depopulation
512(3)
The Onondaga of the Five Nations: Continuous Redefinition of Culture
515(3)
The Archaeology of De Soto
518(2)
Culture Change in the Southeastern Interior
520(3)
The Archaeology of La Florida
523(3)
Spanish Missions
526(3)
Anglo-American Culture: Martin's Hundred and New England
529(3)
Eighteenth-Century Annapolis
532(2)
The Black Experience and Archaeology
534(2)
Mines and Miners
536(2)
Ships and Shipwrecks
538(2)
Further Reading
540(1)
Bibliography 541(17)
Illustration Credits 558(2)
Index and Glossary 560


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