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Anthology Of Classical Myth: Primary Sources in Translation : with Additional Translations by Other Scholars and an Appendix on Linear B sources by Thomas G. Palaima

by ; ; ;
ISBN13:

9780872207219

ISBN10:
0872207218
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
12/10/2004
Publisher(s):
Hackett Pub Co Inc
List Price: $21.00

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Summary

This volume is designed as a companion to the standard undergraduate mythology textbooks or, when assigned alongside the central Greek and Roman works, as a source-based alternative to those textbooks. In addition to the complete texts of the Homeric Hymns and Hesiod's Theogony, this collection provides generous selections from over 50 texts composed between the Archaic Age and the fourth century ad. Ancient interpretation of myth is represented here in selections from the allegorists Heraclitus, Cornutus and Fulgentius, the rationalists Palaephatus and Diodorus of Sicily, and the philosophers and historians Plato, Herodotus and Thucydides. Appendices treat evidence from inscriptions, papyri and Linear B tablets and include a thematic index, a mythological dictionary, and genealogies. A thoughtful Introduction supports students working with the primary sources and the other resources offered here; an extensive note to instructors offers suggestions on how to incorporate this book into their courses.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Acknowledgments xv
A Note to Students xvi
What's in This Book?
xvi
Sources and Problems
xix
Final Advice
xx
Organization and Layout
xxi
Symbols Found in Texts
xxii
A Note to Instructors xxiv
Material for Background and Comparison
xxv
Ancient Approaches to Myth
xxvi
Myth and History
xxvii
Philosophical, Rationalizing, and Allegorical Approaches to Myth
xxvii
Religion and Myth
xxviii
Gender and Sexuality
xxix
Myth as a Source of Inspiration
xxx
Material for Modern Interpretation and Classification of Myth
xxx
Practical Considerations
xxxi
Final Remarks
xxxii
Maps xxxiii
Genealogical Charts xlii
Timelines liv
SELECTIONS
Acusilaus, fragments
1(1)
23 Phoroneus, the First Mortal
1(1)
39 Aphrodite and the Trojan War
1(1)
Aelian, Historical Miscellany, excerpts
2(3)
3.22 Aineias and the Fall of Troy
2(1)
5.21 Medeia's Children
2(1)
8.3 Sacrifices at Athens
2(1)
13.1 Atalante
3(2)
Aeschylus, fragments
5(3)
70 Daughters of Helios. Zeus Is Everything
5(1)
99 The Carians (or Europa). Europa Tells Her Story
5(1)
161 Niobe. Thanatos
6(1)
193 Prometheus Freed. Prometheus Describes His Punishment
6(2)
Andron, fragment
8(1)
10 Origins of the Custom of Cremation
8(1)
Antoninus Liberalis, Collection ofMetamorphoses, selections
9(8)
1 Ctesylla
9(1)
2 The Meleagrides
10(1)
4 Cragaleus
10(1)
6 Periphas
11(1)
10 The Minyades
12(1)
17 Leucippos
12(1)
26 Hylas
13(1)
27 Iphigeneia
13(1)
28 Typhon
13(1)
34 Smyrna
14(1)
36 Pandareos
14(1)
41 The Fox
15(2)
Apollodorus, Library, excerpts
17(41)
A The Early Gods, the Rise of Zeus, and the Titanomachy (1.1.1-1.2.6)
17(2)
B The Children of Zeus, Other Genealogies and Tales (1.3.1-1.4.5)
19(1)
C The Rape of Persephone (1.5.1-1.5.3)
20(1)
D The Gigantomachy and Typhon (1.6.1-1.6.3)
21(2)
E Prometheus and Humanity (1.7.1-1.7.3)
23(1)
F Oineus, Meleagros, and the Calydonian Boar Hunt (1.8.1-1.8.3)
23(2)
G Jason and the Argonauts; Medeia (1.9.16-1.9.28)
25(5)
H Io (2.1.3)
30(1)
I Bellerophontes (2.3.1-2.3.2)
30(1)
J Acrisios, Danae, and Perseus (2.4.1-2.4.5)
31(2)
K Heracles (2.4.8-2.7.7)
33(12)
L Europa and Her Cretan Children (3.1.1-3.1.4)
45(1)
M Cadmos and Thebes (3.4.1-3.7.7)
46(8)
N Theseus (3.15.6-E.1.19)
54(4)
Archilochus, fragments (trans. by A. Miller)
58(1)
122 Zeus and the Eclipse
58(1)
130 All Things Are Easy for the Gods
58(1)
177 Zeus and Justice
58(1)
Arrian, Anabasis, excerpt
59(2)
4.10.5-4.11.8 Worship of Alexander the Great
59(2)
Babrius, Fables, selections
61(2)
20 The Gods Help Those Who Help Themselves
61(1)
68 The Preeminence of Zeus
61(1)
70 The Marriage of Polemos and Hubris
61(1)
117 We Are Ants to the Gods
62(1)
Bacchylides, selections (trans. by A. Miller)
63(10)
Ode 5 Meleagros and Heracles
63(6)
Dithyramb 17 Theseus and Minos
69(4)
Bion, Lament for Adonis
73(3)
Callimachus, Hymns, selections
76(8)
5 Hymn to Athena
76(4)
6 Hymn to Demeter
80(4)
Cleanthes, Hymn to Zeus
84(2)
Conon, Stories, selections
86(3)
24 Narcissos
86(1)
27 Deucalion
86(1)
34 Diomedean Necessity
87(1)
37 Cadmos
87(1)
40 Andromeda
88(1)
Cornutus, Compendium of the Traditions of Greek Theology, excerpts
89(3)
2-3 The Real Natures of Zeus and Hera
89(1)
20 Athena
90(1)
30 Dionysos
90(2)
Critias, Sisyphos, fragment
92(2)
Diodorus of Sicily, Historical Library, excerpts
94(8)
2.45-2.46 The Amazons
94(1)
3.56 Ouranos
95(1)
4.25 Orpheus
96(1)
5.66-5.73 A Euhemerizing Account of the Origin of the Gods
96(6)
Eratosthenes, Constellation Myths, selections
102(5)
7 Scorpios (Scorpio)
102(1)
9 Parthenos (Virgo)
102(1)
10 Didymoi (Gemini)
103(1)
11 Carcinos (Cancer)
103(1)
12 Leon (Leo)
104(1)
14 Tauros (Taurus)
104(1)
19 Crios (Aries)
105(1)
21 Ichthyes (Pisces)
105(1)
26 Hydrochoos (Aquarius)
105(1)
27 Aigoceros (Capricorn)
106(1)
28 Toxotes (Sagittarius)
106(1)
Euripides, fragments
107(4)
286 Bellerophontes. Bellerophontes on the Gods
107(1)
473 The Cretans. Pasiphae Defends Herself
108(1)
660 The Captive Melanippe. Melanippe in Defense of Women
109(2)
Fulgentius, Myths, selections
111(3)
2.11 The Story of Vulcan and Minerva
111(1)
2.12 The Story of Dionysus
112(2)
Hellanicus, fragments
114(2)
88 The Three Kinds of Cyclopes
114(1)
125 Melanthos and Codros
114(1)
145 The Story of Patroclos
115(1)
157 The Murder of Chrysippos Son of Pelops
115(1)
Heraclitus, Homeric Problems, excerpts
116(5)
5 The Nature of Allegory
116(2)
54 Athena versus Ares
118(1)
56 Poseidon versus Apollo
118(1)
69 The Love of Ares and Aphrodite
118(1)
70 Odysseus' Adventures
119(2)
Herodorus, On Heracles, fragments
121(2)
13 A Reinterpretation of Heracles Holding Up the Sky
121(1)
14 The Myth of Heracles as Philosophical Allegory
121(1)
30 A Rationalized Account of the Punishment of Prometheus
122(1)
34 The Six Altars at Olympia
122(1)
Herodotus, Histories, excerpts
123(6)
1.1-1.5 An Historical Interpretation of the Conflict Between Asia and Greece (trans. by S. Shirley)
123(2)
1.23-1.24 Arion and the Dolphin (trans. by S. Shirley)
125(1)
2.113-2.120 The Egyptians on Whether Helen Ever Went to Troy
125(4)
Hesiod, excerpts (trans. by S. Lombardo)
129(39)
Theogony, complete
129(31)
Works and Days 1-234 [1-201]
160(8)
Homeric Hymns (trans. by A. Lang, updated and modified)
168(43)
The long Hymns
168(34)
1 To Dionysos
168(1)
2 To Demeter
169(9)
3 To Apollo
178(9)
4 To Hermes
187(10)
5 To Aphrodite
197(5)
The short Hymns:
202(9)
6 To Aphrodite
7 To Dionysos
8 To Ares
9 To Artemis
10 To Aphrodite
11 To Athena
12 To Hera
13 To Demeter
14 To the Mother of the Gods
15 To Heracles the Lion-Hearted
16 To Asclepios
17 To the Dioscouroi
18 To Hermes
19 To Pan
20 To Hephaistos
21 To Apollo
22 To Poseidon
23 To Highest Zeus
24 To Hestia
25 To the Muses and Apollo
26 To Dionysos
27 To Artemis
28 To Athena
29 To Hestia
30 To Gaia, the Mother of All
31 To Helios
32 To Selene
33 To the Dioscouroi
Horace, Odes, selections
211(5)
1.10 Mercury
211(1)
2.19 Bacchus
212(1)
3.11 The Danaids
213(3)
Hyginus, Stories, selections
216(61)
1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 74, 75, 77, 78, 79, 80, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 125, 126, 127, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 152a, 153, 154, 155, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 169a, 171, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206
Longus, Daphnis and Chloe, excerpts
277(2)
2.34 Pan and Syrinx
277(1)
3.23 Pan and Echo
277(2)
Lucian, selections
279(19)
Dialogues of the Dead
279(1)
23 Agamemnon and Ajax in the Underworld
279(1)
Dialogues of the Gods
280(4)
5 Prometheus and Zeus
280(1)
9 Zeus and Hera Discuss Ixion
281(2)
16 Hermes and Apollo Discuss Hyacinthos
283(1)
Dialogues of the Sea Gods
284(4)
2 Polyphemos and Poseidon
284(1)
7 The Wedding of Peleus and Thetis
285(1)
9 Delos
285(1)
11 Io
286(1)
12 Danae and Perseus in the Chest
287(1)
Judgment of the Goddesses
288(5)
On Sacrifices
293(5)
Lucretius, On the Workings of the Universe, excerpts
298(8)
1.1-1.101 Lucretius Invokes Venus
298(3)
2.589-2.660 The False Myth of Mother Earth
301(2)
5.1161-5.1240 The Origins of Religion
303(3)
Ovid, Heroides, selections
306(23)
1 Penelope to Ulysses
306(3)
3 Briseis to Achilles
309(5)
4 Phaedra to Hippolytus
314(4)
10 Ariadne to Theseus
318(4)
12 Medea to Jason
322(7)
Palaephatus, On Unbelievable Things, selections
329(1)
Prologue
329(11)
1 The Centaurs
330(1)
2 Pasiphae
330(1)
4 The Cadmeian Sphinx
331(1)
6 Actaion
332(1)
15 Europa
333(1)
21 Daidalos
333(1)
24 Geryones
333(1)
28 Bellerophontes
334(1)
30 Phrixos and Helle
334(1)
32 The Amazons
335(1)
33 Orpheus
335(1)
34 Pandora
336(1)
38 The Hydra
336(1)
39 Cerberos
337(1)
40 Alcestis
337(1)
41 Zethos and Amphion
338(1)
42 Io
338(1)
43 Medeia
338(1)
45 The Horn of Amaltheia
339(1)
Parthenius, Sentimental Love Stories, selections
340(4)
Introductory Letter
340(1)
2 Polymele
340(1)
3 Euippe
341(1)
4 Oinone
341(1)
12 Calchos
342(1)
13 Harpalyce
342(1)
15 Daphne
342(1)
20 Leiro
343(1)
29 Daphnis
343(1)
Pausanias, Description of Greece, excerpts (trans. by J. G. Frazer, adapted)
344(10)
A The Sanctuary of Theseus in Athens (1.17.2-1.17.3)
344(1)
B Sanctuary of Dionysos in Athens (1.20.3)
344(1)
C The Tomb of Medeia's Children in Corinth (2.3.6-2.3.9)
345(1)
D The Temple of Hera near Mycenae (2.17.1-2.17.4)
346(1)
E The Grave of Thyestes Between Mycenae and Argos (2.18.1-2.18.2)
346(1)
F Three-eyed Zeus in Larisa near Argos (2.24.3-2.24.4)
347(1)
G Epidauros and Asclepios (2.26.3-2.27.4)
347(2)
H Poseidon and Horses (7.21.7)
349(1)
I The Oracle of Hermes (7.22.2-7.22.4)
350(1)
J Lycanthropy in Arcadia (8.2.3-8.2.7)
350(1)
K Black Demeter near Phigalia in Arcadia (8.42.1-8.42.4)
351(1)
L Actaion's Bed near Plataia in Boiotia (9.2.3-9.2.4)
351(1)
M The Reconciliation of Zeus and Hera in Plataia (9.2.7-9.3.1)
352(1)
N Did Oidipous Have Children By His Mother? (9.5.10-9.5.11)
352(1)
O The Sphinx (9.26.2-9.26.4)
353(1)
Pherecydes, The Histories, fragments
354(2)
10 The Story of Danae
354(1)
11 The Story of Perseus
354(1)
12 The Death of Acrisios
355(1)
Pindar, Olympians, selection (trans. by A. Miller)
356(5)
1 Pelops
356(5)
Plato, excerpts
361(15)
Protagoras
361(2)
320c-322d The Origin of Justice Among Mankind
361(2)
Republic
363(10)
2.376d-2.380c The Role of Poets and Myth in an Ideal State (trans. by G. M. A. Grube, rev. by C. D. C. Reeve)
363(4)
10.614a-10.621d The Myth of Er (trans. by G. M. A. Grube, rev. by C. D. C. Reeve)
367(6)
Symposium
373(3)
189d-193b A Myth About the Origin of the Sexes (trans. by A. Nehemas and P. Woodruff)
373(3)
Plutarch, Life of Theseus, excerpt
376(2)
24.1-25.2 The Synoikismos of Attica
376(2)
Proclus, Summaries of the Cyclic Epics
378(5)
A Cypria
378(2)
B Aithiopis 380 C The Little Iliad
380(1)
D The Sack of Ilion
381(1)
E The Returns
381(1)
F The Telegony
382(1)
Sallustius, On the Gods and the Cosmos, excerpt
383(2)
3-4 The Purpose and Types of Myth
383(2)
Sappho, fragment (trans. by A. Miller)
385(2)
1 Prayer to Aphrodite
385(2)
Semonides, fragment (trans. by A. Miller)
387(4)
7 The Different Kinds of Women
387(4)
Simonides (trans. by A. Miller)
391(1)
543 Perseus in the Chest
391(1)
Sophocles, fragments
392(3)
432 Nauplios. Nauplios on the Achievements of His Son, Palamedes
392(1)
583 Tereus. Procne Laments the Life of Women
392(1)
941 [Unknown tragedy] The Power of Aphrodite
393(1)
1130 [Unknown satyr play] Satyrs as Suitors
394(1)
Statius, Achilleid, excerpts (trans. by N. Zeiner)
395(4)
1.242-1.282 Thetis Takes Achilles to Scyros
395(1)
1.819-1.885 Achilles' True Identity Is Uncovered by Ulysses and Diomedes
396(3)
Theocritus, Idylls
399(3)
11 Polyphemos' Love for Galateia
399(3)
Theophrastus, Characters
402(2)
16 The Superstitious Man
402(2)
Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, excerpt (trans. by P. Woodruff)
404(6)
1.1-1.12 Thucydides Reassesses Greek Prehistory
404(6)
Vergil, excerpts
410(23)
Aeneid
410(20)
2.1-2.558 Aeneas Escapes from Troy
410(11)
6.237-6.755 Aeneas Goes to the Underworld
421(9)
Georgics
430(3)
4.453-4.527 Orpheus in the Underworld
430(3)
Xenophanes, fragments (trans. by A. Miller)
433(2)
11 Homer and Hesiod on the Gods
433(1)
14 What Humans Believe About the Gods
433(1)
15 If Animals Worshiped Gods
433(1)
16 Foreign Gods
433(1)
18 The Gods Withhold Things from Men
434(1)
23 God Is Unlike Man
434(1)
24 God Perceives Everything
434(1)
25 God Sets Everything in Motion
434(1)
26 God Is Motionless
434(1)
Xenophon, Memorabilia, excerpt
435(4)
2.1.21-2.1.34 The Choice of Heracles
435(4)
Appendix One: Linear B Sources 439(16)
Appendix Two: Inscriptions 455(14)
Appendix Three: Papyri 469(10)
Note on the Texts and Translation 479(4)
Names and Transliteration 483(3)
Index/Glossary 486


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