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Applied Behavior Analysis for Teachers,9780130797605
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Applied Behavior Analysis for Teachers

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780130797605

ISBN10:
013079760X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/1999
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

This market-leading book helps students understand and use behavior management concepts in the classroom. The sequence of chapters follows that of an actual behavior analysis; actual data recording sheets, charts, and tables are provided. The text covers identifying target behavior, collecting data, experimental design, arranging antecedents and consequences, and generalizing behavior change. Users love the book's sense of humor and appreciate the talent the authors have for describing complicated information in a clear and appealing manner.

Table of Contents

1 Roots of Applied Behavior Analysis
1(34)
The Usefulness of Explanations
2(1)
Biophysical Explanations
3(5)
Genetic and Hereditary Effects
3(2)
Biochemical Explanations
5(1)
Brain Damage
6(1)
The Usefulness of Biophysical Explanations
6(2)
Developmental Explanations
8(5)
Psychoanalytic Theory
9(1)
A Stage Theory of Cognitive Development
10(1)
Stage Theories and Intelligence
11(1)
The Usefulness of Developmental Theories
11(2)
Cognitive Explanation
13(5)
The Usefulness of Cognitive Theory
16(2)
Behavioral Explanation
18(6)
Positive Reinforcement
19(1)
Negative Reinforcement
19(1)
Punishment
19(1)
Extinction
20(1)
Stimulus Control
20(1)
Other Learning Principles
20(1)
The Task of the Behaviorist
21(1)
The Usefulness of Behavioral Explanation
21(3)
Historical Development of Behaviorism
24(11)
Historical Precedents
25(1)
Philosophical and Psychological Antecedents
26(1)
Respondent Conditioning
27(1)
Associationism
28(1)
Behaviorism
29(1)
Operant Conditioning
29(2)
Summary
31(1)
Discussion Questions
32(3)
2 Responsible Use of Applied Behavior Analysis Procedures
35(24)
Concerns About Applied Behavior Analysis
36(4)
Confusion with Other Procedures
36(2)
Reaction to Controversial Procedures
38(1)
Concerns about Coercion
38(2)
Ethical Use of Applied Behavior Analysis Procedures
40(9)
A Therapeutic Environment
42(2)
Services Whose Overriding Goal Is Personal Welfare
44(1)
Treatment by a Competent Behavior Analyst
45(1)
Programs That Teach Functional Skills
46(1)
Behavioral Assessment and Ongoing Evaluation
47(1)
The Most Effective Treatment Procedures Available
48(1)
Accountability
49(5)
Theory or Recipes
54(1)
Summary
54(1)
Discussion Questions
55(4)
3 Preparing Behavioral Objectives
59(34)
Definition and Purpose
60(3)
Pinpointing Behavior
62(1)
Educational Goals
63(16)
Establishing Goals
63(3)
Components of a Behavioral Objective
66(6)
Identify Criteria for Acceptable Performance
72(2)
Format for a Behavioral Objective
74(5)
Expanding the Scope of the Basic Behavioral Objective
79(7)
Hierarchy of Response Competence
79(3)
Hierarchy of Levels of Learning
82(3)
Learning Levels for the Learner with Limitations
85(1)
Behavioral Objectives and the IEP
86(3)
Summary
89(1)
Discussion Questions
90(3)
4 Procedures for Collecting Data
93(48)
A Rationale
94(1)
Choosing A System
95(5)
Anecdotal Reports
100(3)
Structuring an Anecdotal Report
101(2)
Permanent Product Recording
103(3)
Observational Recording Systems
106(22)
Event Recording
106(11)
Interval Recording and Time Sampling
117(8)
Variations on the Collection Sheet
125(3)
Duration and Latency Recording
128(4)
Duration Recording
128(1)
Latency Recording
129(3)
Reliability
132(1)
Factors That May Affect Data Collection and Interobserver Agreement
133(2)
Summary
135(1)
Discussion Questions
135(6)
5 Graphing Data
141(22)
The Simple Line Graph
142(14)
Basic Elements of the Line Graph
142(3)
Transferring Data to A Graph
145(11)
Additional Graphing Conventions
156(1)
Cumulative Graphs
157(1)
Bar Graphs
158(3)
Summary
161(1)
Discussion Questions
161(2)
6 Single-Subject Designs
163(56)
Variables and Functional Relationships
164(1)
Basic Categories of Designs
165(5)
Single-Subject Designs
166(1)
Baseline Measures
167(3)
Intervention Measures
170(1)
Experimental Control
170(1)
AB Design
170(5)
Implementation
171(1)
Graphic Display
171(1)
Design Application
172(1)
Advantages and Disadvantages
173(2)
Reversal Design
175(5)
Implementation
175(2)
Graphic Display
177(1)
Design Variations
177(1)
Research Application
177(2)
Teaching Application
179(1)
Advantages and a Disadvantage
180(1)
Changing Criterion Design
180(6)
Implementation
180(2)
Graphic Display
182(1)
Research Application
182(2)
Teaching Application
184(1)
Advantage and Disadvantage
184(2)
Multiple Baseline Design
186(11)
Implementation
187(1)
Graphic Display
187(1)
Research Applications
188(7)
Teaching Application
195(1)
Advantages and Disadvantages
195(2)
Alternating Treatments Design
197(7)
Implementation
198(1)
Graphic Display
199(2)
Research Application
201(1)
Teaching Application
202(2)
Advantages and Disadvantages
204(1)
Changing Conditions Design
204(5)
Implementation
205(1)
Graphic Display
205(1)
Research Application
205(2)
Teaching Application
207(2)
Advantages and Disadvantages
209(1)
Evaluating Single-Subject Designs
209(4)
Statistical Analysis
209(1)
Visual Inspection of Graphs
209(4)
Summary
213(1)
Discussion Questions
214(5)
7 Arranging Consequences That Increase Behavior
219(58)
Positive Reinforcement
222(1)
Choosing Effective Reinforcers
223(41)
Making Reinforcers Contingent
226(1)
Making Reinforcement Immediate
227(1)
Types of Reinforcers
227(20)
Contracting
247(4)
Variations in Administration of Reinforcers
251(4)
Group Contingencies and Peer Pressure
255(1)
Schedules of Reinforcement
256(8)
Negative Reinforcement
264(4)
Natural Reinforcement
268(1)
Summary
269(1)
Discussion Questions
270(7)
8 Arranging Consequences That Decrease Behavior
277(56)
Procedural Alternatives for Behavior Reduction
279(1)
Level I: Strategies of Differential Reinforcement
280(10)
Differential Reinforcement of Lower Rates of Behaviors
280(3)
Differential Reinforcement of Other Behaviors
283(3)
Differential Reinforcement of Incompatible Behaviors and Alternative Behaviors
286(4)
Level II: Extinction
290(7)
Delayed Reaction
291(1)
Increased Rate
291(2)
Controlling Attention
293(1)
Extinction-Induced Aggression
293(1)
Spontaneous Recovery
293(1)
Imitation or Reinforcement by Others
294(1)
Limited Generalizability
294(3)
Punishment
297(1)
Level III: Removal of Desirable Stimuli
298(9)
Response-Cost Procedures
298(2)
Time-Out Procedures
300(7)
Level IV: Presentation of Aversive Stimuli
307(14)
Usefulness of Aversive Stimuli
308(2)
Types of Aversive Stimuli
310(4)
Disadvantages of Aversive Stimuli
314(2)
Overcorrection
316(5)
Summary
321(1)
Discussion Questions
322(11)
9 Differential Reinforcement: Stimulus Control and Shaping
333(36)
Differential Reinforcement for Stimulus Control
334(19)
Principles of Discrimination
335(1)
Discrimination Training
336(1)
Concept Formation
337(1)
Prompts
338(4)
Modeling
342(2)
Physical Guidance
344(1)
Fading
344(1)
Decreasing Assistance
345(2)
Graduated Guidance
347(1)
Time Delay
348(1)
Increasing Assistance
349(1)
Effectiveness of Methods for Fading Prompts
350(2)
Effective Prompting
352(1)
Teaching Complex Behaviors
353(8)
Task Analysis
353(4)
Chaining
357(2)
Backward Chaining
359(1)
Forward Chaining
360(1)
Total Task Presentation
360(1)
Differential Reinforcement for Shaping
361(4)
Summary
365(1)
Discussion Questions
366(3)
10 Functional Assessment and Analysis
369(32)
The Need for Another Strategy
370(7)
Discovering the Function a Behavior Serves
371(1)
Antecedent Conditions Functionally Related to Inappropriate Behavior
372(2)
Obscure Consequences Functionally Related to Behavior
374(3)
Stage One: Functional Assessment
377(10)
Informant Assessment
377(5)
Direct Observation Assessment
382(5)
Stage Two: Functional Analysis Procedures
387(9)
Reversal Design
389(1)
Multi-Element Design
390(2)
Settings for Conducting Functional Analysis
392(2)
Functional Equivalency Training
394(2)
Summary
396(1)
Discussion Questions
397(4)
11 Providing for Generalization of Behavior Change
401(36)
Generalization
403(5)
Stimulus Generalization
405(2)
Maintenance
407(1)
Response Generalization
407(1)
Training Generalization
408(21)
Train and Hope
409(2)
Sequentially Modify
411(3)
Introduce to Natural Maintaining Contingencies
414(3)
Train Sufficient Exemplars
417(4)
Train Loosely
421(1)
Use Indiscriminable Contingencies
422(3)
Program Common Stimuli
425(4)
Mediate Generalization and Train to Generalize
429(1)
Summary
429(1)
Discussion Questions
430(7)
12 Teaching Students to Manage Their Own Behavior
437(24)
A Common Experience
439(2)
Preparing Students to Manage Their Own Behavior
441(15)
Goal Setting
441(1)
Self-Recording of Data
442(3)
Self-Evaluation
445(1)
Self-Reinforcement
445(4)
Self-Punishment
449(2)
Self-Instruction
451(5)
Summary
456(1)
Discussion Questions
456(5)
13 Putting It All Together
461(24)
Stimulus Control
462(7)
Physical Arrangement
462(2)
Time Structure
464(1)
Instructional Structure
465(1)
Verbal Structure
466(2)
Teacher Characteristics
468(1)
A Look Into Learning Environments
469(15)
Summary
484(1)
Discussion Questions
484(1)
Appendix: Professional Resolutions Regarding the Avoidance of Aversive Behavioral Intervention 485(8)
Glossary 493(6)
Author Index 499(8)
Subject Index 507


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