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Approaches to Early Childhood Education

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780130852540

ISBN10:
0130852546
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2000
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

May be used for upper level undergraduates and graduate students in Early Childhood Education, Child Development, and Human Development. This up-to-date comprehensive book, with contributions by major experts in the field, focuses on models, approaches, and issues that deal with prominent and tested practices in early childhood education today. It provides coverage of many more models and topics than other books in the field. The book's major strengths are its pluralistic approach and the expertise of the authors.

Table of Contents

Part One INTRODUCTION
Historical Perspectives on Early Childhood Education
3(36)
Patrica Monighan Nourot
Eighteenth-Century Education
3(2)
View of Children
4(1)
Environment and Curriculum
4(1)
Role of Teacher
4(1)
School, Parents, and Community
4(1)
Nineteenth-Century Early Education
5(7)
Pestalozzi's Elementary Education
5(2)
American Infant School
7(1)
Day Nurseries
8(1)
Fireside Education
9(1)
Froebel's Kindergarten
9(2)
Elizabeth Peabody: Kindergarten in America
11(1)
Twentieth-Century Progressive Education
12(1)
Progressives' View of Childhood
12(1)
Environment and Curriculum
12(1)
Role of Teacher
13(1)
School, Parents, and Community
13(1)
Twentieth-Century Child Study
13(3)
Child Study's View of Children
13(1)
Environment and Curriculum
14(1)
Role of Teacher
14(1)
School, Parents, and Community
14(1)
Professionalization
15(1)
Alternatives to Play-Based Nursery
15(1)
Twentieth-Century Innovations in Europe: Montessori's Children's House
16(2)
Montessori's View of Children
16(1)
Environment and Curriculum
16(1)
Role of Teacher
17(1)
School, Parents, and Community
17(1)
United States National Emergencies and Early Education
18(3)
WPA Nurseries
18(1)
Lanham Centers
19(1)
Psychodynamic Influences in Nursery School Education
19(2)
Decline of Progressivism and the Influence of Sputnik
21(1)
Constructivist Theory in Early Education
21(2)
Constructivist View of Children
21(1)
Environment and Curriculum
22(1)
Role of Teacher
22(1)
School, Parents, and Community
22(1)
Head Start
23(3)
Environment and Curriculum Models
23(2)
Effects of Head Start
25(1)
1970--1990: Rapid Change and School Reform
26(3)
Environment and Curriculum Professional Debates
27(1)
Role of Teacher
28(1)
School, Parents, and Community
28(1)
Conclusion
29(2)
References
31(8)
Child Care
39(16)
Carollee Howes
Leslie Ponciano
Forms of Child Care
39(2)
How Do Parents Select Child Care?
40(1)
Quality of Child Care in Center and Family Day Care
41(7)
Structural Quality
41(3)
Teacher Characteristics
44(2)
Child Care Environments That Permit Teachers to Be Effective
46(1)
Process Quality
47(1)
Children's Development and Child-Care Quality
48(2)
Children's Development in Different Types of Child Care
48(1)
Family Characteristics and Child Care
49(1)
Conclusion
50(1)
References
50(5)
The Head Start Program
55(24)
Douglas R. Powell
Evolution of Head Start
55(6)
War on Poverty Origins
55(1)
Naive Assumptions and Political Realities
56(2)
Program Goals
58(2)
Current Scope and Organization
60(1)
Program Services and Effectiveness
61(8)
Early Childhood Development and Health Services
62(2)
Family and Community Partnerships
64(3)
Program Planning and Staffing
67(1)
Program Effectiveness
68(1)
Demonstration Projects
69(2)
Comprehensive Approaches to Supporting Families
70(1)
Child Care and Family Self-Sufficiency
70(1)
Head Start in the 21st Century
71(2)
References
73(6)
Part Two BROAD APPROACHES
Classes for Parents and Young Children: The Family Center Model
79(18)
Marilyn M. Segal
Ongoing Changes in Societal Patterns
82(1)
New Research on Brain Development
82(1)
New Interest in Parent-Infant Programs at Federal, State, and Local Levels
82(2)
Federal Programs
82(1)
State-Mandated Programs
83(1)
Parents as Teachers
83(1)
Community Programs
83(1)
Parent-Infant Programs Designed for Groups
83(1)
Programs for Special Populations
84(1)
Programs for Mexican-American Families
84(1)
Programs for Teen Parents
84(1)
Home Visit Programs
85(1)
Program for Rural Families in Northern New Mexico
85(1)
Home Visit Programs for Premature Infants
85(1)
Parenting Classes
85(7)
MELD Parent Groups
85(1)
Virginia Commonwealth University, Demonstration Parenting Program
86(1)
Systematic Training for Effective Parenting
86(1)
The Family Center of Nova Southeastern University
86(6)
Selecting Teachers for Parent-Infant Classes
92(1)
Inservice Training and Mentorship
92(2)
Workshops
92(1)
Weekly Staff Meetings
92(1)
Conferences
92(1)
Mentorship
92(1)
Tips from Experienced Teachers
92(1)
Evaluation
93(1)
Summary
94(1)
References
94(3)
The Eriksonian Approach
97(26)
Alice Sterling Honig
Description of Family Development Research Program
98(3)
Home Visit Component
98(1)
Children's Center Component
99(2)
Eriksonian Theory: Tenets and Principles
101(5)
Components of Healthy Personality
102(2)
Zones, Modes, and Modalities
104(2)
Caregiver Interactions: An Eriksonian Approach
106(2)
Responsive Attunement of Caregivers
106(2)
Eriksonian Ideas Blended with Piagetian Games
108(1)
Toddlers: The Need to Keep Building Trust
108(1)
Evaluation
109(6)
Optimal Testing: An Eriksonian Approach to Evaluation with Children
110(2)
Longitudinal Follow-Up
112(3)
Lessons from FDRP and Suggestions for Future Programs
115(2)
Conclusion
117(1)
References
118(5)
Behavior Analysis and Principles in Early Childhood Education
123(26)
John T. Neisworth
Thomas J. Buggey
Conceptual and Philosophic Bases
125(4)
Role of Body and Behavior
126(1)
Roles of the Child, Environment, and Teacher
127(1)
Goals and Objectives
128(1)
Two Fundamental Principles of Behavior
129(2)
Principle 1
129(1)
Principle 2
130(1)
Six Important Strategies
131(3)
Strategy 1: Shaping
131(1)
Strategy 2: Sequencing (Chaining) Behaviors
131(1)
Strategy 3: Modeling
132(1)
Strategy 4: Prompting
133(1)
Strategy 5: Behavior Rehearsal
133(1)
Strategy 6: Discrimination Training
133(1)
The Behavioral Classroom
134(12)
Preschool Design
137(2)
Setting the Stage: Stimulus Control
139(3)
Environment as a Reinforcer
142(1)
Accessible Preschools
143(1)
Role of the Behavioral Teacher
144(1)
Preschool Curricula
145(1)
References
146(3)
The Constructivist Perspective on Early Education: Applications to Children's Museums
149(26)
George Forman
Christopher Landry
The Prominence of Constructivism
149(1)
Distinguishing Constructivism from Other Approaches
149(2)
What It Means to Know
150(1)
Knowing When the Child Knows
151(1)
Constructivism and the Young Child
151(2)
The Unit of Knowledge
151(2)
How Children Come to Know
153(1)
Constructivisms Contrasted
153(6)
Social Constructivism
154(1)
Vygotsky's Theory
155(1)
Piaget Versus Vygotsky
156(2)
Constructionism
158(1)
Applications to Early Childhood Education
159(5)
Knowledge Construction from Within
159(1)
Logico-Mathematical Knowledge and Constructivism
160(1)
Directive Teaching and Reflective Abstraction
160(1)
Realtivity of Openness
161(2)
Special-Purpose Versus Open-Ended Material
163(1)
Constructivism in Children's Museums
164(8)
Parameters of the Museum Visit
164(1)
Analyzing Exhibits from a Constructivist Perspective
165(1)
Some Guidelines for Design
165(5)
The Recycling Exhibit Reconsidered
170(1)
The Gravity Wall as a Case in Point
171(1)
Conclusion
172(1)
References
173(2)
The Project Approach: An Overview
175(16)
Lilian G. Katz
Sylvia C. Chard
What Is a Project?
175(1)
Project Work and Other Parts of the Curriculum
176(2)
Theoretical Rationale for the Project Approach
178(3)
Four Type of Learning Goals
178(1)
Implications for Practice and the Learning Goals
178(1)
Principles Related to the Acquisition of Knowledge
179(1)
Principles Related to the Acquisition of Skills
179(1)
Principles Related to Both Knowledge and Skills
180(1)
The Development of Social Competence
180(1)
Implementing Project Work
181(3)
Selecting Topics for Projects
181(2)
Diversity Concerns
183(1)
Preparation for Participation in a Democratic Society
183(1)
Criteria for Selecting Topics
184(1)
Phases of Project Work
184(5)
Phase 1: Getting Started
184(1)
Phase 2: A Project in Progress
184(1)
Phase 3: Concluding a Project
185(1)
A Kindergarten Project on Shoes
186(3)
Summary
189(1)
References
189(2)
Montessori Education Today
191(30)
Martha Torrence
John Chattin-McNichols
Key Tenets and Background Information
193(2)
Montessori's View of Human Development
195(3)
The Absorbent Mind
196(1)
Discipline: The Development of the Will
197(1)
Program Characteristics
198(4)
The Prepared Environment
198(1)
Freedom
198(1)
Structure and Order
199(1)
Reality and Nature
199(1)
Beauty and Atmosphere
199(1)
Montessori Learning Materials
200(1)
The Development of Community Life
201(1)
Curriculum Areas
202(5)
Practical Life
202(1)
Sensorial
203(1)
Language
204(1)
Mathematics
205(1)
Artistic Expression
206(1)
Music
206(1)
The Cultural Subjects: Geography and Science
207(1)
The Role of the Teacher
207(2)
Research on Montessori
209(3)
Discussion
212(3)
Misconceptions about Montessori Education
212(3)
Public Montessori Programs
215(2)
Conclusion
217(1)
Web Resources on Montessori
218(1)
Addresses and Phone Numbers of Major U.S. Montessori Organizations
218(1)
References
219(2)
Mixed-Age Classrooms for Young Children
221(20)
Jaipaul L. Roopnarine
Mellisa A. Clawson
Conceptual Framework
222(4)
Reinforcement and Social Learning
222(1)
Imitation
223(1)
Cognitive Functioning
223(1)
Tutoring and Therapeutic Benefits
224(1)
Other Social Behaviors
225(1)
Cooperative Education
225(1)
Summary of Empirical Bases
226(1)
Overall Goals and Objectives
226(1)
Mixed-Age Programs
226(1)
General Goals of Mixed-Age Programs
226(1)
Preschool Mixed-Age Classrooms
227(1)
Implementation
227(2)
Curriculum
228(1)
Role of Teachers
228(1)
Role of Parents
229(1)
Observation and Assessments
229(4)
The Kentucky Experiment: Primary Ungraded Programs
230(1)
Outcomes across Programs
230(1)
Mixed-Age Inclusive Classrooms
231(1)
Mixed-Age Programs Internationally
232(1)
Implications for Teachers
232(1)
Summary
233(1)
References
233(8)
Part Three SPECIFIC PROGRAMS
The Portage Project: An International Home Approach to Early Intervention for Young Children and Their Families
241(22)
David E. Shearer
Darlene L. Shearer
Home-Based Early Intervention
241(3)
Rationale for Active Parent Participation
242(1)
Rationale for a Home-Based Approach
243(1)
The Portage Model
244(6)
Parents as Primary Teachers
244(1)
Ongoing Assessment
245(2)
Precision Teaching Method
247(1)
Home Teaching Process
247(2)
Data Collection and Accountability
249(1)
Portage Home Visits
250(1)
Research and Evaluation of the Portage Model
250(2)
Adaptations and Applications of Portage
252(3)
The Portage Parent Program
252(1)
Urban Applications
253(1)
International Applications
253(2)
New Challenges for Portage
255(2)
Applications with At-Risk Populations
256(1)
Conclusion
257(1)
References
257(6)
The Developmental-Interaction Approach at Bank Street College of Education
263(14)
Harriet K. Cuffaro
Nancy Nager
Edna K. Shapiro
History and Evolution
263(2)
Basic Principles
265(2)
Curriculum
267(5)
The Learner
267(1)
Knowledge and Experience
267(1)
Teacher
268(1)
Learning Environment
268(1)
Experiencing and Integrating Knowledge
269(1)
The Family
269(1)
The Community
270(1)
Communities of the Past
270(1)
Assessment
271(1)
Implications for Teacher Education
272(1)
Summary
273(1)
References
274(3)
The High/Scope Curriculum for Early Childhood Care and Education
277(18)
David P. Weikart
Lawrence J. Schweinhart
History
278(1)
Active Learning by the Child
279(1)
Role of the Teacher
279(1)
Daily Routine to Support Active Learning
280(2)
Planning Time
280(1)
Work Time
280(1)
Cleanup Time
281(1)
Recall Time
281(1)
Small-Group Time
281(1)
Large-Group Time
282(1)
Key Experiences in Child Development
282(1)
High/Scope Child Observation Record
283(1)
Role of Parents and Community
284(1)
High/Scope Curriculum Training
284(1)
Research Support for the High/Scope Curriculum
285(5)
Implications
289(1)
Relationship of Research to the High/Scope Curriculum
290(1)
Summary
291(1)
References
292(3)
The Ausubelian Preschool Classroom
295(20)
Joseph T. Lawton
Program Approach
295(5)
Subsumption Learning
295(4)
Beyond Given Information
299(1)
Logical Concepts
299(1)
Teaching Method in Ausubelian Program
300(6)
Advance Organizer Lesson
304(1)
Example of Advance Organizer Lesson
305(1)
Related Learning Activities
306(1)
A Typical Day in an Ausubelian Program
306(1)
Program Evaluation
307(4)
Five-Year Study: Phase One
307(1)
Five-Year Study: Phase Two
308(1)
Description of Teacher-Child Language in Two Preschool Programs
309(1)
Value of Teacher-Directed Learning and Recent Research
310(1)
Summary
311(1)
References
312(3)
Educating the Young Thinker Model, from Research to Practice
315(26)
Irving E. Sigel
Preamble
315(5)
Some Guidelines for Evaluating Preschool Programs
316(4)
Conceptual Origins of the Program
320(1)
Conceptualization of the Problem
321(1)
Conceptual Answers Regarding Representational Competence
322(1)
First Attempt at Intervention with Distancing Strategies
322(1)
Conceptual Focus of Educating the Young Thinker Program
323(3)
Role of Teacher
324(1)
Staffing
325(1)
A Day in Preschool
326(8)
Classroom Environment
329(2)
Activities That Highlight Distancing
331(1)
Distancing Model
331(1)
Program Evaluation
332(1)
Summary
333(1)
Further Examples Supporting the Psychological Distancing Model
334(3)
Psychological Distancing Tested in the Family Context
335(2)
Preliminary Findings Relative to Changes in Children's Home and School Performance
337(1)
Further Theoretical and Practical Implications
337(1)
References
338(3)
Reggio Emilia: An Approach or An Attitude?
341(20)
Rebecca S.
Reggio Emilia in Context
341(2)
A City That Is Rich, Radical, and Resourceful
341(1)
A Man and a Mission
342(1)
Reggio Emilia Is Italian
343(1)
Reggio Emilia as a Case of Selected Traditions
343(12)
The Environment as Cultural Setting
344(3)
Curriculum as Imagined Potential
347(8)
Conclusion
355(2)
References
357(4)
Part Four INTEGRAL DIMENSIONS
Including Everyone
361(18)
Ellen Barnes
Robert Lehr
Jowonio History
363(1)
Philosophical Base
363(3)
All Children Can Learn
363(1)
Right to Participate
363(1)
Learning through Relationships
363(1)
Age-Appropriate Curriculum
364(1)
Communication-Based Classrooms
364(1)
Parent-Teacher Partnership
365(1)
Teaming Skills
366(1)
Dealing with Problem Behavior
366(4)
Behavior as Communication
367(1)
Positive Programming
367(1)
Reinforcing Positive Behaviors
367(1)
Interventions within Relationships
367(1)
Using Natural Consequences
368(1)
Aversive Treatment Is Unacceptable
369(1)
Behavioral Interventions in an Inclusive Setting
369(1)
Problem-Solving Approach
369(1)
Implementing an Individualized Education Program
369(1)
School and Class Composition
370(1)
Strategies for Accomplishing Inclusion
370(2)
Flexibility in Scheduling
370(1)
Flexibility in Grouping
371(1)
Curriculum Adaptation
371(1)
Transitioning to Next Environment
372(2)
Implications for Teacher Training
374(1)
Additional Inclusion Efforts
374(1)
Summary
375(1)
References
376(3)
A Framework for Culturally Relevant, Multicultural, and Antibias Education in the 21st Century
379(26)
Louise Derman-Sparks
Patricia G. Ramsey
What and How Young Children Learn about Diversity
380(7)
Children's Responses to Race
381(1)
Children's Responses to Social Class Differences
382(1)
Children's Responses to Culture
382(2)
Children's Responses to Gender Differences
384(1)
Responses to Abilities and Disabilities
384(1)
How Children Learn about Diversity
385(2)
Educational Approaches to Diversity: Past and Present
387(6)
Suppression of Cultural Diversity
387(1)
Melting Pot
388(1)
Add-On Multiculturalism
388(1)
Bilingualism/Biculturalism
389(2)
Antibias Multicultural Education
391(2)
Quality Education for the 21st Century: Teacher Implications
393(6)
Goals for Children in the 21st Century
394(1)
Preparing to Teach from an Antibias Multicultural Perspective
395(1)
Planning Strategies
396(1)
Collaborating with Parents, Colleagues, and Community Members
397(1)
Forming Support Groups and Networks
398(1)
Conclusion
399(1)
References
399(6)
Epilogue 405(8)
Index 413


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