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Archaeology (Book with CD-ROM)

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Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780155058996

ISBN10:
0155058991
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/3/2005
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $145.95

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Summary

This new edition by David Hurst Thomas and Robert L. Kelly pairs two of archaeology's most recognized names--with a combined 70 years of experience--for the first time. David Hurst Thomas of the American Museum of Natural History and Robert L. Kelly of the University of Wyoming bring readers a textbook rich with examples drawn from their experiences leading excavations over the past thirty years. A major revision, this fourth edition of ARCHAEOLOGY reflects the most recent research and changes in the field, while covering the core concepts in an exceptionally student-friendly fashion. This edition continues a tradition of academic rigor and engaging writing style that have made this text one of the most well-respected and best-selling texts in the discipline. The new edition is enhanced with full-color photos and a completely new design. The rich array of supplemental resources includes a new companion website, as well as the option to use a new CD-ROM, DOING FIELDWORK: ARCHAEOLOGICAL DEMONSTRATIONS developed by the authors.

Table of Contents

Meet Some Real Archaeologists
1(23)
Preview
2(1)
Introduction
2(3)
Who Was ``Kennewick Man''?
2(1)
Who Controls Human Remains?
3(1)
Kennewick and American Archaeology
3(1)
Looking Closer: American Indian or Native American?
4(1)
The Western World Discovers Its Past
5(3)
Archaeology and Society
5(1)
Looking Closer: Ad/Bc/Bp . . . Archaeology's Alphabet Soup
6(1)
The Discovery of Deep Time
7(1)
Archaeology and Native Americans
8(1)
Founders of Americanist Archaeology
8(7)
C. B. Moore: A Genteel Antiquarian
9(1)
Nels Nelson: America's First-Generation ``Working'' Archaeologist
10(1)
A. V. ``Ted'' Kidder: Founder of Anthropological Archaeology
11(1)
In His Own Words: The Pan-Scientific Approach to Archaeology by A. V. Kidder
12(1)
James A. Ford: A Master of Time
13(1)
In His Own Words: The Goals of Archaeology by James A. Ford
14(1)
Americanist Archaeology at Mid-Twentieth Century
14(1)
Revolution in Archaeology: An Advancing Science
15(4)
Walter W. Taylor: Moses in the Wilderness
15(2)
Lewis R. Binford: Visionary with a Message
17(1)
In His Own Words: The Challenge of Archaeology by Lewis R. Binford
18(1)
Archaeology in the Twenty-First Century
19(3)
Kathleen A. Deagan: Archaeology Comes of Age
19(2)
In Her Own Words: The Potential of Historical Archaeology by Kathleen Deagan
21(1)
Conclusion: Archaeology's Future
22(2)
Summary
22(1)
Additional Reading
22(1)
Online Resources
23(1)
Archaeology, Anthropology, Science, and the Humanities
24(26)
Preview
25(1)
Introduction
25(1)
So, What's an Anthropological Approach?
26(2)
Kinds of Anthropologists
26(2)
The Culture Concept in Anthropology
28(5)
What Is Culture?
28(1)
How Do Anthropologists Study Culture?
29(1)
An Example: The Kwakwak'awakw Potlatch
30(1)
Looking Closer: Who Are We? by Gloria Cranmer Webster
31(2)
Scientific and Humanistic Approaches in Archaeology
33(15)
What's a Scientific Approach?
33(1)
How Science Explains Things: The Moundbuilder Myth
34(3)
Archaeological Ethics: Does Archaeology Put Native Americans on Trial?
37(3)
The Scientific Method
40(3)
What's a Humanistic Approach?
43(1)
Looking Closer: Sioux or Dakota?
44(2)
In Her Own Words: What This Awl Means by Janet Spector
46(2)
Conclusion: Scientist or Humanist?
48(2)
Summary
48(1)
Additional Reading
49(1)
Online Resources
49(1)
The Structure of Archaeological Inquiry
50(27)
Preview
51(1)
Introduction
51(1)
Levels of Theory
52(4)
What Are Data?
52(1)
Low-Level Theory
53(1)
Middle-Level Theory
54(1)
High-Level Theory
55(1)
Paradigms
56(1)
Paradigms in Archaeology
56(9)
Cultural Materialism
57(2)
Processual Archaeology: Materialism at Work in Archaeology
59(1)
Postmodernism
60(1)
Archaeological Ethics: Excavating the Dead of World War I
61(3)
Postprocessual Archaeology: Postmodernism at Work in Archaeology
64(1)
Is Postmodernism All That New?
65(5)
Adolph Bandelier: Scientific Humanist or Humanistic Scientist?
66(1)
Looking Closer: Anasazi or Ancestral Pueblo?
66(3)
In His Own Words: Bringing Tyuonyi's Past Alive by Adolph Bandelier
69(1)
Archaeology Today
70(1)
Processual-Plus
71(1)
The Structure of Archaeological Inquiry
71(4)
Profile of an Archaeologist: Michelle Hegmon
72(2)
Testing Ideas
74(1)
Reconstructing the Past
75(1)
Conclusion: Processualist or Postprocessualist?
75(2)
Summary
76(1)
Additional Reading
76(1)
Online Resources
76(1)
Doing Fieldwork: Surveying for Archaeological Sites
77(30)
Preview
78(1)
Introduction
78(1)
Good Old Gumshoe Survey
78(2)
Searching for Gatecliff
79(1)
Looking Closer: How Do Archaeological Sites Get Their Names?
80(1)
Archaeology Is More than Just Digging Sites
80(3)
The Fallacy of the ``Typical'' Site
81(2)
Looking Closer: The Surveyor's Toolkit
83(1)
Surface Archaeology in the Carson Desert
83(8)
Some Sampling Considerations
85(2)
Getting the Sample
87(1)
Doing the Work
88(1)
What We Learned
89(1)
Looking Closer: Archaeological Survey in the Carson Desert
90(1)
Does Sampling Actually Work? The Chaco Experiment
91(2)
Quality Control in Surface Survey
93(3)
So, What's a Site?
94(2)
What about Things That Lie below Ground?
96(5)
Shovel-Testing
97(1)
How to Find a Lost Spanish Mission (Part I)
98(1)
Archaeological Ethics: Professional and Avocational Archaeologists by Hester A. Davis
99(2)
GPS Technology and Modern Surveys
101(1)
Full-Coverage Survey
101(3)
The Valley of Oaxaca Archaeological Survey
101(1)
What's Outside Monte Alban?
102(1)
The Case for Full-Coverage Survey
103(1)
The Special Case of Cultural Resource Management
104(1)
Conclusion
104(3)
Summary
105(1)
Additional Reading
105(1)
Online Resources
106(1)
Doing Fieldwork: Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems
107(21)
Preview
108(1)
Introduction
108(1)
Remote Sensing: Data at a Distance
109(3)
High Altitude Imagery
109(2)
Looking Closer: Remote Sensing Imagery: Other Ways of Seeing
111(1)
How to Find a Lost Spanish Mission (Part II)
112(4)
The Proton Magnetometer
113(1)
Soil Resistivity
114(1)
Ground-Penetrating Radar
115(1)
Ceren: The New World Pompeii?
116(2)
The Potential and Limitations of Noninvasive Archaeology
118(1)
Geographic Information Systems
119(6)
Archaeological Ethics: Remote Sensing the Sacred
120(1)
The Predictive Capacity of GIS: The Aberdeen Proving Ground
121(1)
Landscape Archaeology
122(3)
Conclusion: The Future of Remote Sensing and GIS
125(3)
Summary
126(1)
Additional Reading
126(1)
Online Resources
127(1)
Doing Fieldwork: Why Archaeologists Dig Square Holes
128(23)
Preview
129(1)
Introduction
129(3)
The Folsom Site and Humanity's Antiquity in North America
130(2)
Excavation: What Determines Preservation?
132(4)
The Duck Decoys of Lovelock Cave
132(1)
The Houses of Ozette
133(1)
The Ice Man of the Alps
133(1)
The Preservation Equation
134(1)
Looking Closer: The Excavator's Toolkit
135(1)
Principles of Archaeological Excavation
136(3)
Test Excavations
136(1)
Expanding the Test Excavation
137(1)
How Archaeologists Dig
138(1)
Expanding Gatecliff's Excavation
139(1)
Precision Excavation
139(4)
Archaeological Ethics: The Curation Crisis: What Happens to All That Stuff after the Excavation?
142(1)
Is That All There Is to It?
143(1)
Sifting the Evidence
143(4)
Water-Screening and Matrix-Sorting
144(1)
Flotation
145(2)
Cataloging the Finds
147(1)
Conclusion: Archaeology's Conservation Ethic: Dig Only What You Must
147(4)
Profile of an Archaeologist: An African Archaeologist by Chapurukha Kusimba
148(1)
Summary
149(1)
Additional Reading
150(1)
Online Resources
150(1)
Geoarchaeology and Site Formation Processes
151(24)
Preview
152(1)
Introduction
152(1)
The Law of Superposition
153(3)
Fossil Footprints at Laetoli: The Law of Superposition in Action
153(3)
Reading Gatecliff's Dirt
156(6)
Gatecliff's Stratigraphy
156(1)
Looking Closer: What Happened to the Laetoli Footprints?
157(1)
Marker Beds
158(2)
Gatecliff as a Geologic Deposit
160(2)
Is Stratigraphy Really That Easy?
162(3)
Reverse Stratigraphy at Chetro Ketl
162(2)
In Her Own Words: Fieldwork 1920s-Style at Chetro Ketl by Florence Hawley Ellis
164(1)
Site Formation Processes: How Good Sites Go Bad
165(8)
Formation Processes in the Systemic Context
165(2)
Formation Processes in the Archaeological Context
167(2)
An Ancient Living Floor at Cagny-l'Epinette?
169(1)
Archaeological Ethics: Should Antiquities Be Returned to the Country of Origin?
170(3)
Conclusion
173(2)
Summary
173(1)
Additional Reading
174(1)
Online Resources
174(1)
Chronology Building: How to Get a Date
175(31)
Preview
176(1)
Introduction
176(1)
Relative Dating
176(5)
The Index Fossil Concept in Archaeology
177(2)
The Next Step: Seriation
179(2)
Absolute Dating
181(16)
Tree-Ring Dating
181(3)
Radiocarbon Dating: Archaeology's Workhorse
184(4)
Accelerator Dating: Taking Radiocarbon to the Limit
188(1)
Looking Closer: How to Calibrate Radiocarbon Dates
189(1)
Trapped Charge Dating
190(1)
Looking Closer: Is the Shroud of Turin the Burial Cloth of Christ?
191(4)
Potassium-Argon and Argon-Argon
195(2)
What Do Dates Mean?
197(2)
How Old Are the Pyramids?
197(2)
The Check, Please
199(1)
Dating in Historical Archaeology
199(5)
Archaeological Ethics: What's Wrong with Buying Antiquities? (Part I)
200(1)
Pipe Stem Dating
201(1)
Terminus Post Quem Dating
202(1)
Mean Ceramic Dates
202(2)
Conclusion
204(2)
Summary
204(1)
Additional Reading
205(1)
Online Resources
205(1)
The Dimensions of Archaeology: Time, Space, and Form
206(27)
Preview
207(1)
Introduction
207(2)
Looking Closer: Preserving the Hunley
208(1)
After the Excavation: Conservation and Cataloging
209(1)
Archaeological Classification
210(11)
Types of Types
211(2)
Projectile Point Typology at Gatecliff
213(3)
Looking Closer: The Frison Effect
216(2)
Gatecliff Projectile Points as Temporal Types
218(3)
Space-Time Systematics
221(6)
Archaeological Cultures: Dividing Space
221(1)
Profile of an Archaeologist: A Cultural Resource Management Archaeologist by William Doelle
222(1)
Periods: Dividing Time
223(2)
Phases: Combining Space and Time
225(1)
Phases: The Basic Units of Space-Time Systematics
226(1)
Conclusion: Space-Time Systematics and Archaeological Objectives
227(6)
Archaeological Ethics: What's Wrong with Buying Antiquities? (Part II)
228(3)
Summary
231(1)
Additional Reading
231(1)
Online Resources
232(1)
Taphonomy, Experimental Archaeology, and Ethnoarchaeology
233(32)
Preview
234(1)
Introduction
234(1)
Middle-Range Research: What Is It?
235(6)
Some Bones of Contention
235(1)
Analogy versus Middle-Range Theory
236(4)
Archaeological Ethics: The Ethics of Doing Ethnoarchaeology
240(1)
Taphonomy
241(4)
Taphonomy at the Hudson-Meng Bison Bonebed
242(2)
Taphonomy and Uniformitarianism
244(1)
Experimental Archaeology
245(10)
Looking Closer: What Happened to Ishi?
246(1)
How Were Stone Tools Made?
246(3)
Experimental Archaeology and Uniformitarianism
249(1)
Looking Closer: Obsidian Blade Technology: Modern Surgery's Newest Ancient Frontier
250(2)
What Were Stone Tools Used For?
252(3)
Ethnoarchaeology
255(8)
Binford Takes Off for Points North
255(1)
In His Own Words: Why I Began Doing Ethnoarchaeology by Lewis R. Binford
256(1)
Ethnoarchaeology in Madagascar
256(2)
Looking Closer: Doing Ethnoarchaeology in Madagascar by Robert Kelly
258(2)
Ethnoarchaeology and Uniformitarianism
260(3)
Conclusion
263(2)
Summary
263(1)
Additional Reading
264(1)
Online Resources
264(1)
People, Plants, and Animals in the Past
265(31)
Preview
266(1)
Introduction
266(1)
What's an Archaeofauna?
266(12)
The Agate Basin Site
267(6)
The Zooarchaeology of a Peruvian Civilization
273(1)
Looking Closer: What Did Sixteenth-Century Colonists Eat in Spanish Florida?
274(4)
Studying Plant Remains from Archaeological Sites
278(12)
Palynology
279(3)
Looking Closer: Palynology of Shanidar Cave: Why Formation Processes Matter
282(1)
What Plants Did People Eat in the Stillwater Marsh?
283(2)
Wood Rat Nests
285(2)
Coprolites of Hidden Cave
287(1)
Archaeological Ethics: Are Archaeologists Responsible for Media Reports?
288(1)
Lipid Analysis: Squeezing Fat from Ceramics
289(1)
The Symbolic Meaning of Plants: The Upper Mantaro Valley Project
290(4)
What Explains Wood Use?
292(1)
Relating Ideology to the Past
293(1)
Conclusion
294(2)
Summary
294(1)
Additional Reading
295(1)
Online Resources
295(1)
Bioarchaeological Approaches to the Past
296(26)
Preview
297(1)
Introduction
297(2)
Looking Closer: Native Americans and the Stillwater Burials
298(1)
Skeletal Analysis: The Basics
299(2)
Determining Sex
300(1)
Determining Age
300(1)
How Well Did the Stillwater People Live?
301(6)
Looking Closer: Bushmen, !Kung, San, Basarwa, Ju/'hoansi
302(1)
Disease and Trauma at Stillwater
303(1)
Growth Arrest Features
303(1)
Workload
304(2)
Paleodemography
306(1)
Stature
307(1)
Reconstructing Diet from Human Bone
307(4)
Cavities
307(1)
Profile of an Archaeologist: A Native American Archaeologist by Dorothy Lippert
308(1)
Bone and Stable Isotopes
308(3)
Lives of Affluence? or Nasty, Brutish, and Short?
311(1)
Archaeology and DNA: Tracing Human Migrations
311(9)
Archaeological Ethics: Should We Excavate and Analyze Human Remains?
312(1)
A Little Background on DNA
313(1)
Prospecting for Ancient DNA
313(1)
An African Eve?
314(1)
Skulls and DNA: Tracking the First Americans
315(2)
Looking Closer: Tracking Native Americans' Ancestors through Historical Linguistics
317(3)
Conclusion
320(2)
Summary
320(1)
Additional Reading
321(1)
Online Resources
321(1)
Reconstructing Social and Political Systems of the Past
322(31)
Preview
323(1)
Introduction
323(2)
Social Vocabulary
323(1)
From Artifact to Symbol
324(1)
Archaeology and Gender
325(6)
Hunting in Africa's Rain Forest
327(1)
Reconstructing Male and Female Activities from Archaeology
328(3)
Archaeology and Kinship
331(7)
Forms of Kinship
332(2)
Do Descent Systems Appear Archaeologically?
334(1)
Looking for Matrilineal Descent
335(1)
Kinship at Chaco Canyon
335(1)
Looking Closer: Did People Share Food at Pincevent?
336(2)
Archaeology and Social Status
338(8)
Egalitarian Societies
339(1)
Ranked Societies
339(1)
Death and Social Status
339(1)
Rank and Status at Moundville
339(5)
Kinship at Moundville
344(1)
Archaeological Ethics: Development and Archaeology
344(2)
Trade and Political Organization
346(5)
Tracing Exotics
346(5)
Conclusion
351(2)
Summary
351(1)
Additional Reading
352(1)
Online Resources
352(1)
The Archaeology of the Mind
353(24)
Preview
354(1)
Introduction
354(1)
What's a Symbol?
355(3)
Looking Closer: Food Taboos in the Near East
356(2)
The Peace Pipe as Ritual Weapon
358(2)
Exploring Ancient Chavin Cosmology
360(6)
Animal Symbolism in Chavin Iconography
361(1)
Where Did Chavin Cosmology Come From?
362(1)
The Role of Cosmology in Andean Civilization
363(1)
Archaeological Ethics: What Role Do Oral Traditions Play in Archaeology?
364(2)
Blueprints for an Archaeology of the Mind
366(1)
Upper Paleolithic Cave Art
366(9)
Art or Magic?
368(2)
Shamanism?
370(1)
The Cave of Lascaux
371(1)
Looking Closer: The Discovery of Lascaux
372(3)
Conclusion
375(2)
Summary
375(1)
Additional Reading
376(1)
Online Resources
376(1)
Understanding Key Transitions in World Prehistory
377(31)
Preview
378(1)
Introduction
378(1)
Evolutionary Studies
379(6)
Unilineal Cultural Evolution
379(2)
How ``Evolution'' Became a Dirty Word
381(1)
The Return of Evolution
382(3)
Why Were Plants Domesticated?
385(9)
The Unilineal Paradigm: Childe and Braidwood
385(1)
The Materialist Paradigm: Population Pressure
386(2)
Looking Closer: Hunter-Gatherers as Optimal Foragers
388(2)
A Social Perspective
390(1)
The Origins of Agriculture in the Near East
390(2)
Archaeological Ethics: Who Should Control and Own Sacred Sites?
392(1)
Comparing the Paradigms
392(2)
Why Did the Archaic State Arise?
394(12)
The Irrigation Hypothesis
395(1)
The Warfare and Circumscription Hypothesis
396(1)
A Multicausal Theory
397(2)
The Role of Ideology in State Formation
399(1)
The Maya: A Case Study in State Formation
400(4)
Looking Closer: How the Maya Reckoned Time
404(1)
So, What Explains the Origin of the Maya State?
405(1)
Conclusion
406(2)
Summary
406(1)
Additional Reading
407(1)
Online Resources
407(1)
Historical Archaeology: Insights on American History
408(27)
Preview
409(1)
Introduction
409(1)
Why Do Historical Archaeology?
410(1)
Historical Archaeology: Just a ``Handmaiden to History''?
410(4)
Historical Archaeology Comes of Age
411(1)
Characteristics of Historical Archaeology
412(1)
Themes in Historical Archaeology
412(1)
In Her Own Words: Why Are So Few African-Americans Doing African-American Archaeology? by Theresa A. Singleton
413(1)
Hidden History: The Archaeology of African Americans
414(8)
Slave Archaeology at Monticello
414(3)
Beyond Plantation Archaeology: New York City's African Burial Ground
417(3)
In His Own Words: Balancing Interests at the African Burial Ground by Michael L. Blakey
420(1)
Beyond Slavery
421(1)
Looking Closer: Fort Mose: Colonial America's Black Fortress of Freedom
422(1)
Correcting Inaccuracies
422(5)
What Happened at the Battle of the Little Bighorn?
422(2)
An Archaeological Perspective on the Battle
424(2)
Archaeological Ethics: Archaeology and the Values of Descendant Communities
426(1)
Re-Examining America's History
427(5)
Historical Archaeology in Annapolis
427(4)
Taking Critical Theory Public
431(1)
Conclusion: Historical Archaeology's Future
432(3)
Summary
433(1)
Additional Reading
434(1)
Online Resources
434(1)
Caring for America's Cultural Heritage
435(29)
Preview
436(1)
Introduction
436(1)
The Development of Cultural Resource Management
437(5)
Early Efforts to Preserve America's Heritage
437(1)
Profile of an Archaeologist: A Federal Archaeologist by Terry Fifield
438(1)
The Antiquities Act of 1906
439(2)
The River Basin Surveys
441(1)
Historic Preservation Comes of Age
442(1)
The National Historic Preservation Act
442(4)
Archaeological Ethics: The Preservation Dilemma: Should We Not Dig at All?
443(1)
Section 110: The Government Must Inventory Lands
444(1)
Section 106: The Government Must Consider the Effects of Its Actions on Historic Properties
444(1)
The National Register and Archaeological Significance
445(1)
Compliance Archaeology
446(1)
The Archaeological Resources Protection Act
446(4)
Looking Closer: Help Find Moundville's Stolen Ceramics
447(1)
What about State and Private Land?
448(1)
Looking Closer: ARPA and Elephant Mountain Cave
449(1)
Challenges Facing CRM Archaeology
450(3)
Significance: Yours or Mine?
450(1)
What Happens to All the Data?
451(1)
The Need for Professional Standards
451(1)
In Their Own Words: Contrasting Views of ``Significance'' at Zuni Pueblo by Roger Anyon and T. J. Ferguson
452(1)
CRM and Education
453(1)
International Efforts to Protect Cultural Resources
453(2)
Looking Closer: What Courses Prepare You for a Career in Archaeology?
454(1)
The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990
455(6)
Looking Closer: Archaeology and War
456(1)
Human Remains Discovered after NAGPRA
457(1)
Native Americans and Cultural Affiliation
458(1)
Is Kennewick Native American?
459(1)
Can Kennewick Be Culturally Affiliated with Modern Tribes?
460(1)
What Does NAGPRA Mean by ``Identity''?
461(1)
Conclusion
461(3)
Summary
462(1)
Additional Reading
462(1)
Online Resources
463(1)
Archaeology's Future
464(29)
Preview
465(1)
Introduction
465(1)
Archaeological Science: Pure or Applied?
466(1)
The Garbage Project
467(3)
How Do Archaeologists Collect Trash?
467(1)
The Archaeology of Us
468(1)
Myths about America's Landfills
468(2)
Forensic Archaeology
470(6)
Archaeologists as Crime Busters
470(1)
The Archaeology of Mass Disasters
471(1)
In Her Own Words: The Journey of a Forensic Anthropologist by Clea Koff
472(2)
Archaeology and the World Trade Center
474(1)
In His Own Words: Disaster Archaeology by Richard A. Gould
474(2)
Rediscovering Ancient Technology
476(1)
Public Education
477(5)
In Her Own Words: Zooarchaeology and Biological Conservation by Virginia Butler
478(2)
Refighting the Battle of the Alamo
480(1)
Looking Closer: Hispanic, Latino, Chicano, or Anglo?
481(1)
Who Has the Authority to Study the Past?
482(6)
A Spiritual Site: The Bighorn Medicine Wheel
482(2)
Who Owns the Past?
484(1)
In His Own Words: Archaeological Sites or Sacred Places? A Native American Perspective by William Tallbull
485(2)
Why We Do Archaeology Affects How We Do Archaeology
487(1)
Seeking Common Ground
488(2)
Digging Kodiak: Native American Archaeologists at Work
488(1)
Looking Closer: Inuit, Eskimo, Yup'ik, Inupiaq?
488(2)
Conclusion
490(3)
Summary
491(1)
Additional Reading
491(1)
Online Resources
492(1)
Glossary 493(14)
Bibliography 507(38)
Photo Credits 545(2)
Index 547


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