CART

(0) items

Art and Architecture of the Seventeenth Century,9780131455818
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Art and Architecture of the Seventeenth Century

by ;
ISBN13:

9780131455818

ISBN10:
0131455818
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $108.80
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $5.00

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Seventeenth Century Art and Architecture
    Seventeenth Century Art and Architecture




Author Biography

Ann Sutherland Harris is Professor of the History of Art and Architecture at the University of Pittsburgh.

Table of Contents

Preface viii
Introduction xi
Politics, Religion, and Art xi
The Economics of Art xii
Geography, Cosmology, and Astronomy xiii
Concepts of the Body, Ancient and Modern xv
Education and Literacy xvi
Artists' Changing Status and Training xvii
New Subjects, New Genres xviii
Transforming the Renaissance and ``Baroque'' Art xxi
Italy
1(142)
The Decline of Mannerism
3(1)
Architecture and City Planning in Rome, 1585--1625
4(3)
Bolognese Painting: The Carracci Reform
7(14)
Painting in Rome, 1585--1610
21(13)
Annibale Carracci in Rome, 1595--1609
24(10)
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio
34(16)
Caravaggio's Italian Followers
50(6)
The Carracci Succession in Rome and Bologna
56(22)
Architecture and City Planning in Rome, 1625-1680
78(7)
Italian Sculpture
85(28)
Gian Lorenzo Bernini's Early Career
86(5)
Bernini, Algardi, and the Portrait Bust
91(3)
The Competition: Alessandro Algardi and Francesco Duquesnoy
94(5)
Bernini and Urban VIII
99(9)
Algardi and Bernini during the Papacy of Innocent X
108(5)
Painting in Rome, 1623--1680
113(21)
Pietro da Cortona
113(7)
Andrea Sacchi
120(3)
Pietro da Cortona in Florence and Rome
123(2)
Carlo Maratta
125(2)
Giovanni Battista Gaulli (II Baciccio)
127(7)
Painting in Naples
134(9)
Flanders
143(52)
Peter Paul Rubens
145(29)
Rubens in Italy, 1600-1608
148(4)
Rubens in Antwerp, 1609--1622
152(13)
Rubens, Diplomat and Artist, 1622-1630
165(4)
Rubens's Last Decade, 1630--1640
169(5)
Anthony van Dyck
174(8)
Van Dyck in England and Italy, 1621--1627
176(4)
Van Dyck's Second Antwerp Period, 1627--1632
180(2)
Jacob Jordaens
182(4)
Still-Life Genre Painters
186(9)
Spain
195(48)
Spanish Architecture
196(1)
Spanish Sculpture
197(3)
Spanish Painting, 1600--1650
200(32)
Jusepe de Ribera
201(7)
Francisco de Zurbaran
208(9)
Diego Velazquez in Seville
217(3)
Velazquez in Madrid, 1623--1648
220(8)
Velazquez in Italy, 1648--1651
228(1)
Velazquez in Madrid, 1651--1660
228(4)
Spanish Painting, 1650--1700
232(11)
Bartolome Esteban Murillo
232(7)
Juan de Valdez Leal and Claudio Coello
239(4)
France
243(68)
Architecture and City Planning
244(10)
Paris: The Pont-Neuf, Palais du Luxembourg, and Hotel de la Vrilliere
244(4)
Expansion under Louis XIV; The Louvre and Versailles
248(6)
French Sculpture
254(4)
Pierre Puget
255(1)
Francois Girardon and Antoine Coysevox
256(2)
French Painting and Printmaking
258(53)
Simon Vouet
260(3)
Valentin de Boulogne
263(1)
Georges de la Tour
264(3)
Simon Vouet's Successors
267(2)
Philippe de Champaigne
269(4)
Nicolas Poussin in Paris and Rome
273(6)
Poussin after 1630
279(10)
Poussin and Landscape Painting
289(3)
Poussin's Last Works
292(3)
Claude Lorrain and French Landscape Painting
295(8)
Charles Le Brun and the Academy
303(8)
The Dutch Republic
311(76)
Haarlem and the Creation of a Dutch National Style
313(2)
The Haarlem Mannerists
313(2)
The Utrecht ``Caravaggisti''
315(4)
Frans Hals and Dutch Portraiture
319(8)
Town Planning and Architectural Developments in Haarlem and Amsterdam
327(6)
Painting in Amsterdam
333(1)
Rembrandt van Rijn and his School
334(22)
Rembrandt's Early Years in Leiden
334(2)
Rembrandt in Amsterdam, 1627--1639
336(5)
Rembrandt's Self-Portraits
341(3)
Rembrandt in Amsterdam, 1639--1642
344(2)
Rembrandt's Landscape Prints and Drawings
346(2)
Rembrandt after 1642
348(6)
Rembrandt's Artistic Heirs
354(2)
Dutch Genre Painting before 1650
356(5)
Judith Leyster
358(3)
Dutch Genre Painting after 1650
361(17)
Johannes Vermeer
366(8)
Jan Steen
374(4)
Landscape Painting before 1650
378(2)
Early Tonal Landscape Painting
378(2)
Landscape Painting after 1650
380(7)
England
387(17)
English Painting
388(8)
Van Dyck in England
388(5)
Later Portrait Painters
393(3)
Palladianism and Architectural Planning in London
396(8)
Inigo Jones
396(2)
Christopher Wren
398(6)
Epilogue 404(3)
Notes 407(1)
Timeline 408(4)
Bibliography 412(4)
Picture Credits 416(1)
Index 417

Excerpts

THIS BOOK IS WRITTEN as an introduction to the most significant artistic developments in Western Europe in the seventeenth century. It is intended to inform students of art and the interested reading public about a period that encompassed the careers of many of the bestknown artists of European history. The text privileges painting over sculpture and architecture. Far more painting than sculpture was produced because the latter is an expensive medium and fewer artists took it up. Dutch, Flemish, and English patrons usually imported sculptors or sculpture from France or Italy, so their own sculpture is not covered here. French, Spanish, and Italian sculpture is covered with an emphasis on Gian Lorenzo Bernini, the transformative genius of this medium in the seventeenth century. The achievements of Europe's architects and builders could easily have dominated everything else in the book. Because architectural history is usually taught separately in American colleges (except in introductory survey courses), this text focuses on a few key architects and monuments, and on city planning in Rome, Paris, and London. Those readers whose main interest is architecture of this period will find books such as the PelicanHistory of Art(Yale University Press) and Baroque (Kdnemann; ed. Rolf Toman) readily available sources of supplementary information. This book focuses on the six countries whose art and architecture is usually taught in courses on European Baroque art--Italy, Flanders, Spain, France, the Dutch Republic, and England. There is no chapter on artists from eastern or central Europe (what remained of the Holy Roman Empire), because the turmoil of the Thirty Years' War, finally ended by the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648, did not allow any cities in these countries to provide steady patronage for native artists for most of the seventeenth century. The Habsburg court of Emperor Rudolf II in Prague, where he ruled from 1576 until 1612, attracted painters, engravers, and sculptors from Antwerp, Amsterdam, Frankfurt, Basle, and Milan. Their sophisticated style became the final fling of Mannerism. The court moved to Vienna in 1620. Most ambitious young artists born in the territories now called Germany, Austria, and the Czech Republic left for Flanders or Italy, ostensibly to train, but many never returned; among those were the painters Adam Elsheimer, included here in the chapter on Italy, and Johann Liss from Oldenburg, who died in Venice. The first and longest chapter is devoted to Italy. In the sixteenth century Italy became a magnet for artists from the Netherlands and France, while Italian artists were sought by courts in Spain, France, and England. The influence of Raphael, Michelangelo, and their successors soon reached Antwerp, Madrid, and Fontainebleau outside Paris. Thus, the logical place to begin our story is Italy, specifically Bologna and Rome where the Carracci and Caravaggio began the stylistic revolution that deposed an international Mannerist style and replaced it with other styles based on renewed life study and a respect for Renaissance artists least affected bymaniera.The Counter-Reformation Church offered so many opportunities for artists in Rome that the city became the most important center of artistic production in Europe. Its only rivals in Italy were Bologna and Naples, the former too small to offer serious competition (although its artists were enjoying their greatest period of achievement), the latter controlled by the Spanish monarchy. Venice produced no worthy successors to Titian, Tintoretto, and Veronese until the eighteenth century. Thus Rome remained the most important European city for ambitious artists until Paris gradually replaced it in the nineteenth century. The next chapters discuss Flanders and Spain, whose developments were most directly affected by Italian art. Both were Catholic countries and Flanders (the Spanish Netherlands) was still part of


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...