9781412806077

Art in Crisis: The Lost Center

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781412806077

  • ISBN10:

    1412806070

  • Format: Nonspecific Binding
  • Copyright: 2006-11-15
  • Publisher: Routledge
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Summary

The history of art from the early nineteenth century onward is commonly viewed as a succession of conflicts between innovatory and established styles that culminated in the formalism and aesthetic autonomy of high modernism. In Art and Crisis, first published in 1948, Hans Sedlmayr argues that the aesthetic disjunctures of modern art signify more than matters of style and point to much deeper processes of cultural and religious disintegration.

Author Biography

Hans Sedlmayr (1896-1984) was a founding member of the New Vienna School of art historians

Table of Contents

Transaction Introduction xiii
Introduction 1(1)
The Theme
1(4)
Limitations of the Thesis
5(4)
Part One SYMPTOMS
New Master Problems
9(51)
The Withering of the old Composite Works of Art
11(3)
The Landscape Garden
14(6)
The Architectural Monument
20(7)
The Museum
27(5)
Utilitarian and Domestic Architecture
32(3)
Domestic Building
35(3)
The Theatre
38(9)
The Exhibition
47(7)
Theatre and Exhibition
54(1)
The House of the Machine
54(4)
Summary
58(2)
The Search for a Lost Style
60(19)
All Tasks claim Equality of Status
62(3)
The Egalitarianism of the first Architecture of the Revolution
65(1)
Stylistic Compromise: Neo-Hellenism and Neo-Gothic
66(2)
Pluralism of Styles
68(2)
The Neo-Renaissance as a total Restoration
70(2)
The Rise of Technical Architecture
72(1)
Egalitarianism of the Second Revolution: The New Building
73(2)
Reaction: Neo-Classicism as a Mask
75(1)
The Beginnings of a new Pluralism
76(1)
Party Warfare of Style in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
77(2)
The Isolation of the Arts
79(16)
The 'Pure' Garden
80(1)
Autonomous Architecture
80(2)
Pure Sculpture
82(1)
The Art of the Line Drawing
83(1)
The Art of Pure Drawing and the Silhouette
83(1)
Pure Painting
84(1)
Extrusion from Painting of the Element of Architecture
85(1)
Pictures confined to the purely visible
86(1)
'Absolute Painting', 'Absolute Drawing' and 'Absolute Sculpture'
87(1)
By-products of the Picture's disintegration
87(1)
The Death of the Composite Work of Art
88(1)
The Death of Iconology
89(2)
The Death of the Ornament
91(1)
The Dissolution of the Boundaries of Art
92(3)
The Attack on Architecture
95(17)
The Garden Revolution, the Dethronement of Architecture
95(1)
Artificial Ruins
96(1)
The First (Unconscious) Revolution against Architecture
97(5)
The Revolution continues underground
102(1)
The Revolt of the Ornament against Architecture
102(2)
The Second Revolution against Architecture: The Denial of the Earth Base
104(4)
Unstable Architecture
108(1)
The Abolition of Architecture
109(3)
The Significance of the Fragment
112(4)
The Torso
113(3)
Chaos Unleashed
116(31)
The Revolution in Painting
116(1)
The Demons (Goya)
117(4)
The Desolation of Man (C. D. Friedrich)
121(3)
Man Distorted (The Caricature)
124(3)
The Meaninglessness of the World (Grandville)
127(2)
Pure Seeing (Cezanne)
129(6)
Unfettered Painting and Chaos
135(6)
The Chaos of Total Decay
141(6)
Part Two DIAGNOSIS AND PROGRESS OF THE DISEASE
'Analogia Morbi'
147(23)
The Loss of the Mean
152(1)
The Flight from Humanism
153(3)
Away from Man
156(4)
Descent to the Inorganic
160(5)
Descent to the Chaotic
165(2)
'Analogia Morbi'
167(3)
'Autonomous' Man
170(7)
The Problem of Causes
170(1)
The Disturbance is Total
171(2)
Autonomous Art and Autonomous Man
173(2)
Structure of the Disturbance
175(2)
At the Origins of the Present
177(7)
Deism and its Consequences
177(1)
The Pantheism of Holderlin
178(3)
Anti-theism
181(1)
Causes of the Disturbance
181(3)
Precursors of Modern Art
184(12)
Demonism and the Late Romanesque
184(2)
Bosch and the Kingdom of Hell
186(3)
Mannerism and the Nearness of Death
189(3)
Bruegel and the Degradation of Man
192(2)
Summary
194(2)
The Three Artistic Revolutions of the Eighteenth Century
196(6)
Rococo
197(2)
England's Role
199(1)
French Revolution
200(1)
Summary
200(2)
From the Liberation of Art to the Negation of Art
202(9)
The Course of the Disease
203(1)
First Phase (1770--1830)
204(1)
Second Phase (1830--1840)
205(1)
Third Phase (1840--1885)
205(1)
Fourth Phase (Latent from 1885, Overt since 1900)
206(1)
The Agents of the Process
206(1)
The Present
207(4)
Part Three TOWARDS A PROGNOSIS AND A FINAL JUDGEMENT
An Evaluation of the Epoch
211(5)
Towards an Evaluation of Modern Art
216(8)
Artistic Standards
216(5)
In Defence of the Extremists
221(3)
Modern Art as the Fourth Phase of Western Art
224(12)
First Phase: God---Temporal Rule; Pre-Romanesque and Romanesque (550--1150)
225(3)
Second Phase: God Incarnate; 'Gothic' (1140--1470)
228(2)
Third Phase: The God-Man and Man the God; Renaissance and Baroque (1470--1750)
230(4)
Gothic and Renaissance-Baroque
234(1)
Fourth Phase: Autonomous Man; The Modern Age (1750--?)
234(2)
Today as the Turning Point in the History of Man
236(7)
The Ageing of Civilization
236(2)
Dehumanization
238(2)
World-wide Diffusion
240(1)
Future Possibilities
241(2)
Prognosis
243(11)
The Position in the Field of Art
245(3)
The Position in the Field of Material Culture
248(3)
The Position in the Intellectual Field
251(1)
The Spiritual
252(2)
Postscript
254(9)
Four Ways of Considering Art
256(7)
Index of Persons 263

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