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Art Past, Art Present

by ; ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780131504721

ISBN10:
013150472X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2009
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div
List Price: $126.80

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Summary

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE NEW EDITION This new fifth edition of Art Past Art Present builds on its reputation for balanced coverage of global art, with new sect in Chapter 3 "Ancient Art," on the Olmec in Mesoamerica, Nomadic Art in Siberia, the Han Dynasty in China, and Dongson Culture in Vietnam. Chapter 4, "Art from 200-1400," no", includes Moai Ancestor Figures from Polynesia, an The Great Mosque at Jenne, while later chapters see new units on Machu Picchu, The Taj Mahal, and eighteenth-century art in Korea. Coverage of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries has been comprehensively revised and expanded, in Chapter 10 "Art from 1900-1949," Chapter 11 "Art from 1950-1999," and the newly created Chapter 12 "Art in the Nee Millennium," which includes such works as Mariko Mori's Wave UFO, and Bill Viola's Five Angels for the Millennium.

Author Biography

Bernard Schultz is Dean of the College of Creative Arts, Director of the Creative Arts Center and Professor of Art History at West Virginia University.

Table of Contents

Getting Started xii
Experiencing Art
1(22)
Experiencing Art
2(2)
How to Experience Art
3(1)
Viewing Art
4(4)
Understanding Style
4(1)
Art, Time, and the Cycles of Life
4(1)
Analyzing Three Works
5(3)
Analyzing Art
8(10)
Analyzing Architecture
8(4)
Analyzing Sculpture
12(2)
Analyzing Ritual Art
14(1)
Analyzing Installation Art
15(1)
Analyzing Painting and Related Media
15(3)
Art and Artists in History
18(5)
Artists in Ancient Greece and Rome
18(1)
Artists in the Middle Ages in Europe
19(1)
Artists in China
19(1)
Western Artists from the Renaissance until Today
19(2)
Artists in Africa
21(1)
Artists in India
21(2)
Prehistoric Art
23(10)
Introduction to Prehistoric Art
24(9)
The Paleolithic Period
24(1)
The Discovery of Paleolithic Painting
24(1)
Paleolithic Art
25(2)
The Neolithic Period
27(1)
Neolithic Art and Architecture
27(3)
Prehistoric Art and the Prehistoric Artist
30(3)
Ancient Art
33(104)
Introduction to Ancient Art
34(4)
History
35(1)
Art of Ancient Societies
36(1)
The Ancient Artist
37(1)
Art Past/Art Present: The Concept of the Classical in the West
37(1)
Sumerian Art
38(4)
Ancient Egyptian Art
42(4)
History
42(2)
Religion
44(1)
Art of Ancient Egypt
44(1)
The Egyptian Artist
45(1)
Ancient Egyptian Art: The Palette of Narmer
46(2)
Technique: Relief Sculpture
46(2)
The Egyptian Pyramids
48(2)
The Egyptian Temple
50(4)
Technique: Post-and-Lintel Construction
52(1)
Technique: How to Read Architectural Diagrams
53(1)
Egyptian Tomb Paintings and Painted Reliefs
54(2)
Technique: Figure--Ground Relationships
55(1)
The Indus Valley Civilization
56(2)
Aegean Art: Minoan and Mycenaean
58(4)
Ancient China: The Shang Dynasty
62(2)
Technique: Chinese Piece-Mold Bronze Casting
63(1)
Assyrian and Early Persian Art
64(2)
Mesoamerica: The Olmec
66(2)
Etruscan Art
68(2)
Ancient Greek Art
70(4)
History
70(2)
Intellectual and Scientific Activities
72(1)
Religion
73(1)
Ancient Greek Art
73(1)
The Ancient Greek Artist
73(1)
Greek Vase Painting
74(2)
The Development of Greek Sculpture
76(8)
Technique: Greek Lost-Wax Bronze Casting
79(2)
Technique: Contrapposto in Sculpture
81(1)
Technique: The Classical Orders
82(1)
Art Past/Art Present: The Impact of the Ancient Greek Orders
82(2)
Greek Doric Architecture
84(2)
Technique: Greek Temple Construction
85(1)
The Parthenon, Athens
86(4)
Nomadic Art in Siberia: Pazyryk
90(4)
The Qin Empire in China
94(2)
Hellenistic Art
96(4)
History
97(1)
Art of the Hellenistic Period
97(1)
Hellenistic Painting
98(1)
Hellenistic Sculpture in Pergamon
99(1)
The Han Dynasty in China
100(2)
Early Buddhist Art
102(4)
Dongson Culture in Vietnam
106(2)
The Art of the Roman Republic
108(4)
History
108(1)
Republican Architectural Developments
109(1)
The Roman House and Villa
109(3)
The Art of the Roman Empire
112(8)
History
112(1)
The City of Rome
113(2)
Roman Imperial Art
115(3)
Technology, Organization, and Engineering
118(1)
Roman Religion and the Mystery Religions
118(1)
The End of Rome's Empire
118(1)
The Roman Artist
118(2)
Roman Frescoes and Illusionism
120(4)
Technique: Roman Fresco
122(1)
Technique: Illusionism
123(1)
Roman Architecture: The Flavian Amphitheater
124(6)
Technique: Roman Engineering: The Arch, The Vault, and Concrete
126(4)
Roman Architecture: The Pantheon, Rome
130(2)
Mesoamerican Art: Teotihuacan
132(5)
Art From 200 to 1400
137(94)
Introduction to Art from 200 to 1400
138(6)
Art Past/Art Present: Naming the Middle Ages in Europe
138(3)
History
141(1)
Art and the Christian Church
142(1)
The Scroll and Book
142(1)
The Artist
143(1)
Jewish Art: The Synagogue at Dura Europos
144(2)
Early Christian Art
146(2)
History
146(1)
Art
147(1)
Early Christian Architecture
148(2)
The Shinto Shrine at Ise, Japan
150(2)
Byzantine Art
152(2)
History
152(1)
The Icon and Iconoclasm
153(1)
The Byzantine Artist
153(1)
Byzantine Architecture: Hagia Sophia
154(2)
Byzantine Art: San Vitale, Ravenna
156(4)
Technique: Mosaic
159(1)
Anglo-Saxon Metalwork
160(2)
Hiberno-Saxon Manuscript Illumination
162(2)
The Chinese Imperial City of Chang'An
164(4)
Buddhist Art at Horyuji
168(4)
Technique: Dougong Bracketing
171(1)
Hindu Art at Ellora
172(2)
Islamic Art at Cordoba
174(4)
Carolingian and Ottonian Art
178(2)
The Monastery in the West
180(2)
Buddhist Art in Indonesia
182(2)
Chinese Art: Landscape Painting
184(4)
Art Past/Art Present: Chinese Aesthetic Theory
187(1)
Romanesque Art in Europe
188(4)
History
188(1)
Art and the Pilgrim
189(1)
Manuscript Illumination
189(1)
The Bayeux Tapestry
190(1)
The Romanesque Artist in Europe
191(1)
Romanesque Architecture at Conques
192(2)
Romanesque Sculpture
194(2)
Moai Ancestor Figures, Polynesia
196(2)
Later Byzantine Art
198(2)
Angkor Wat: Cult of the God-King
200(2)
The Japanese Narrative Scroll
202(4)
Gothic Art
206(4)
Abbot Suger
207(1)
History
207(1)
Art
208(1)
The Franciscans
209(1)
The Gothic Artist
209(1)
The Gothic Cathedral: Chartres
210(6)
Technique: Proportions of Gothic Cathedrals, 1160--1230
210(4)
Technique: Gothic Engineering
214(2)
Gothic Sculpture
216(2)
Gothic Stained Glass
218(2)
Technique: Stained-Glass Technique
219(1)
The Great Mosque at Jenne
220(2)
Early Italian Painting
222(2)
Giotto, The Arena Chapel Frescoes
224(4)
Technique: Tempera and Fresco
226(2)
The Royal Art of African Kingdoms
228(3)
Fifteenth-Century Art
231(48)
Introduction to Fifteenth-Century Art
232(10)
Fifteenth-Century Worldwide Developments
235(1)
The Idea of a Renaissance
236(1)
Naming the Styles
236(1)
European History
237(1)
Italian Renaissance Humanism and Art Theory
238(1)
European Intellectual Activity
239(1)
Changing Patterns of Patronage in Europe
239(1)
The Fifteenth-Century Artist in Europe
240(2)
Early Renaissance Sculpture in Florence
242(2)
Technique: Carving in Wood
243(1)
Flemish Painting: The Limbourg Brothers
244(2)
Flemish Painting: Robert Campin
246(2)
Italian Renaissance Painting: Masaccio
248(2)
Scientific Perspective
250(2)
Flemish Painting: Hubert and Jan van Eyck
252(2)
Flemish Painting: Jan van Eyck
254(4)
Technique: The Development of Oil Painting in Flanders
256(2)
Italian Renaissance Architecture: Brunelleschi
258(2)
Machu Picchu: The Peruvian Mountain Retreat
260(2)
The Italian Renaissance Palace
262(2)
Portraiture
264(4)
Italian Renaissance Painting: Andrea Mantegna
268(2)
Technique: Foreshortening
269(1)
Italian Renaissance Painting: Sandro Botticelli
270(2)
Italian Renaissance Painting: Leonardo Da Vinci
272(2)
Italian Renaissance Painting: Leonardo's Last Supper
274(2)
Italian Renaissance Sculpture: Michelangelo's St. Peter's Pieta
276(3)
Sixteenth-Century Art
279(52)
Introduction to Sixteenth-Century Art
280(10)
History
281(3)
Intellectual and Scientific Developments
284(1)
Religious Reform and Art during the Sixteenth Century
284(4)
The Sixteenth-Century Artist
288(2)
Italian Renaissance Sculpture: Michelangelo
290(2)
Technique: Stone Sculpture
291(1)
Italian High Renaissance Portraiture
292(2)
German Printmaking: Albrecht Durer
294(4)
Technique: Printmaking: Engraving and Woodcut
296(2)
New St. Peter's, Rome
298(2)
Michelangelo, Sistine Chapel Ceiling
300(4)
Art Past/Art Present: Vasari and Modern Scholarship
303(1)
Raphael, Stanza Della Segnatura
304(2)
High Renaissance Painting in Venice
306(2)
Hieronymus Bosch, ``Garden of Earthly Delights'' Triptych
308(2)
German Painting: Matthias Grunewald, Isenheim Altarpiece
310(2)
Titian's Altarpieces
312(4)
Technique: Venetian Painting
314(2)
Later Michelangelo and the Development of Mannerism
316(2)
Early European Landscape Painting
318(2)
Sixteenth-Century Painting
320(2)
Islamic Art of the Ottomans
322(2)
Palladio
324(2)
Veronese and the Impact of the Counter-Reformation
326(2)
The Art of Zen Buddhism in Japan
328(3)
Seventeenth-Century Art
331(46)
Introduction to Seventeenth-Century Art
332(8)
History
332(3)
Intellectual and Scientific Activity
335(1)
The Styles of Seventeenth-Century European Art
336(1)
Seventeenth-Century European Art
336(2)
The Seventeenth-Century Artist in Europe
338(2)
Caravaggio and His Influence
340(2)
Baroque Genre Painting
342(2)
Peter Paul Rubens
344(2)
Bernini's Works for St. Peter's
346(2)
The Dutch Baroque Group Portrait
348(2)
Mughal Art of India: The Taj Mahal
350(2)
Baroque Architecture: Francesco Borromini
352(2)
Bernini, Ecstasy of Saint Teresa
354(4)
Technique: The Art of Drawing: Rembrandt
356(2)
Rembrandt: Late Paintings
358(4)
Technique: Printmaking: Etching and Drypoint
360(2)
Spanish Painting: Diego Velazquez
362(2)
Baroque Classicism: Nicolas Poussin
364(2)
Dutch Still-Life Painting
366(2)
The Palace at Versailles
368(2)
Japanese Art
370(4)
European Landscape Painting
374(3)
Eighteenth-Century Art
377(22)
Introduction to Eighteenth-Century Art
378(8)
History
379(3)
Intellectual and Scientific Activity
382(1)
Eighteenth-Century Art
382(2)
The Eighteenth-Century Artist
384(2)
Eighteenth-Century Painting in Europe
386(2)
Eighteenth-Century Art in Korea
388(2)
Rococo Architecture and Sculpture
390(2)
Eighteenth-Century Portraiture
392(2)
Thomas Jefferson and Neoclassical Architecture in the United States
394(2)
Neoclassical Painting
396(3)
Nineteenth-Century Art
399(70)
Introduction to Nineteenth-Century Art
400(12)
History
401(2)
The Industrial Revolution around the World
403(2)
European Intellectual and Scientific Activities
405(1)
Art
405(1)
Art Past/Art Present: Looking Beyond the Art: Romanticism
405(3)
The Impact of French Painting on World Art
408(1)
The Styles of Nineteenth-Century Art in the West
408(1)
The Nineteenth-Century Artist
409(3)
The Continuation of Neoclassicism
412(2)
Francisco Goya
414(2)
Romanticism
416(2)
Romantic Landscape Painting
418(2)
Japanese Woodblock Prints
420(4)
Technique: Japanese Woodblock Technique
421(3)
Honore Daumier and the Political Print
424(2)
Technique: Lithography
425(1)
Romantic Revival Architecture
426(2)
American Romantic Painting
428(2)
Revolutionary Art vs. Academic Art
430(2)
New Materials and Engineering in Architecture
432(4)
Technique: New Materials in Architecture
434(2)
Late Nineteenth-Century Revival Architecture
436(2)
Edouard Manet
438(2)
Early Photography and Photographic Technique
440(2)
Late Nineteenth-Century Sculpture
442(2)
Impressionism
444(4)
Technique: Impressionism
446(2)
Edgar Degas, Berthe Morisot, and Mary Cassatt
448(2)
American Realism: Thomas Eakins and Henry Tanner
450(2)
Auguste Rodin
452(2)
Winslow Homer
454(2)
Technique: Watercolor and Gouache
455(1)
Post-Impressionism: Gauguin and Seurat
456(2)
Post-Impressionism: Van Gogh
458(4)
Art Past/Art Present: The Value of Art: Van Gogh
460(2)
Post-Impressionism: Cezanne
462(2)
The Beginnings of the Skyscraper
464(2)
Edvard Munch
466(3)
Art from 1900 to 1949
469(62)
Introduction to Art from 1900 to 1949
470(8)
History
470(2)
Intellectual and Scientific Activity
472(1)
Art from 1900 to 1949
473(3)
The Artist
476(2)
Fauvism
478(2)
African Art and Ritual
480(2)
Photography
482(2)
Cubism and its Influence
484(6)
Technique: Collage and Assemblage
489(1)
Native American Art
490(4)
Art Past/Art Present: Women in Pueblo Society
493(1)
Frank Lloyd Wright, Robie House
494(2)
Technique: The Cantilever
495(1)
Abstraction in Sculpture
496(2)
Malevich and the Russian Avant-Garde
498(2)
German Expressionism: Die Brucke and Der Blaue Reiter
500(2)
Fantasy
502(2)
Dada
504(4)
De Stijl and the Bauhaus
508(4)
Diego Rivera and Mexican Mural Painting
512(2)
Surrealism
514(4)
Modernism in American Painting
518(4)
Pablo Picasso, Guernica
522(2)
Sculpture of the 1930s and 1940s
524(4)
International Style Architecture
528(3)
Art from 1950 to 1999
531(44)
The 1950s
532(10)
The 1960s
542(4)
The 1970s
546(6)
The 1980s
552(10)
The 1990s
562(13)
Art in the New Millennium
575(31)
Art in the New Millennium
576(12)
Themes
Theme: Ritual and Art
588(2)
Theme: The Presence of the Artist
590(2)
Theme: Religious Architecture
592(2)
Theme: Portraiture
594(2)
Theme: The Nude/The Body
596(2)
Theme: Relating to Nature
598(2)
Theme: Representing Women
600(2)
Theme: The Artist as a Revolutionary
602(2)
Theme: The Home and the Palace
604(2)
World Map 606(1)
Glossary 607(8)
Bibliography 615(3)
Index 618(17)
Credits 635

Excerpts

Getting Started WhyArt Past/Art Present? Art Past/Art Presentis based on the idea that works of art communicate to us across time and history. Works of art engage us on a visual level, but further study reveals how they can remind us of the diversity and communality of human experience. To understand the visual language of art and be receptive to its communication, however, requires active participation. How can we begin to establish a dialogue between ourselves and works of art? How can we achieve an understanding of past and present art from other societies? And, in an age teeming with information, how do we move from information to knowledge and understanding?Art Past/Art Presenthas been designed to help us begin to answer these questions. The book opens with a chapter called "Experiencing Art" (pp. 1-7) that will help establish the language and techniques useful for analyzing art and for understanding art and artists within a historical context. What is the basic approach ofArt Past/Art Present? In creatingArt Past/Art Present,we accepted the underlying assumptions that art results from the human experience of life and that art is itself fundamentally expressive. We wanted to offer the reader a clear, concise, and integrated treatment of a limited number of works from around the world. Why is history so important in understanding works of art? InArt Past/Art Present,the works are discussed within a historical framework to emphasize the circumstances under which they were created and to encourage us to question how they might originally have been viewed and how they may have functioned; such an approach is known ascontextualism.We urge the study of art in concert with history, politics, religion, geography, society, and culture in general, including music, dance, and literature, in order to more fully understand the scope and diversity of human history. Chapters 2 through 10 ofArt Past/Art Presenteach open with an overview of developments in history and art for each time period: prehistoric, ancient, 200 to 1400, fifteenth century, sixteenth century, seventeenth century, eighteenth century, nineteenth century, and the first half of the twentieth century. The second half of the twentieth century (Chapter 11) is treated differently, in decades, and Chapter 12 is dedicated to the new art of the twenty-first century. A section at the end of each overview discusses the role and status of artists during this period; when possible, self-portraits of artists are illustrated in this section. Following the overviews for each period, there are two-, four, six-, and eight-page units that start with a key work. These key works establish a chronology forArt Past/Art Present. Why such a distinct chronological approach? If you thumb throughArt Past/Art Presentlooking at the top of the right page of each unit, you'll see a series of timelines with dates that are chronological in sequence. In our minds there is historical truth in this chronology, for it means that the works and related events are presented roughly as they happened; such a chronology reminds us that Donatello, Ghiberti, and Van Eyck (pp. 239-55), for example, were all working at about the same time, or that the rock-cut Hindu temple at Ellora (pp. 172-73) was being carved at the same time that the Muslims were erecting the huge mosque in Cordoba (pp. 17477). Such an interweaving of works offers insights into contemporary developments around the globe. At the same time, the organization ofArt Past/Art Presentin units means that the teacher or reader can focus on each unit independently. What is the point of the timelines like the one seen at the top of this page? These timelines list historical events and cultural developments from the period in order to build context for the works of art being discussed. While there is no dir


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