CART

(0) items

The Art and Science of Leadership,9780130458124
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

The Art and Science of Leadership

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780130458124

ISBN10:
0130458120
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div

Related Products


  • Art and Science of Leadership
    Art and Science of Leadership
  • Art and Science of Leadership
    Art and Science of Leadership
  • The Art and Science of Leadership
    The Art and Science of Leadership
  • The Art and Science of Leadership
    The Art and Science of Leadership
  • The Art and Science of Leadership
    The Art and Science of Leadership
  • The Art and Science of Leadership
    The Art and Science of Leadership





Summary

Offers a broad review and analysis of the field of leadership, complete with its many debates and controversies. For middle and upper level managers. Softcover.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
PART I: BUILDING BLOCKS 1(122)
Definition and Significance of Leadership
3(29)
What Is an Effective Leader?
4(3)
Who Is a Leader?
4(1)
What Is Effectiveness
5(2)
Culture and Leadership
7(7)
Levels of Culture
8(2)
Models of Culture
10(4)
Obstacles to Effective Leadership
14(1)
Leadership and Management
15(1)
Roles and Functions of Leaders
16(5)
Managerial Roles
16(2)
Functions of the Leader: Creation and Maintenance of an Organizational Culture
18(3)
Does Leadership Make a Difference?
21(2)
Arguments Against the Impact of Leadership
21(2)
Arguments for the Impact of Leadership
23(1)
Reconciling the Differences
23(1)
Summary and Conclusion
23(2)
Leadership Challenge
25(1)
Review and Discussion Questions
26(1)
Searching the Web
26(1)
What Is Leadership?
27(1)
Images of Leadership
28(1)
Narian Bridges
29(2)
Leadership in Action: Alessi Embraces Failure
31(1)
Leadership: Past, Present, and Future
32(25)
A History of Modern Leadership Theory
33(6)
The Trait Era: Late 1800s to Mid-1940s
33(2)
Behavior Era: Mid-1940s to Early 1970s
35(2)
The Contingency Era: Early 1960s to Present
37(2)
The Present: Current Trends in Leadership Practice and Research
39(9)
Leader Characteristics and Traits Revisited
39(3)
Changes in Organizations and in Expectations of Leaders
42(6)
Summary and Conclusion
48(2)
Leadership Challenge
50(1)
Review and Discussion Questions
51(1)
Searching the Web
51(1)
Old Wines and New Skins
52(1)
The Toy Factory
53(1)
Leadership and Gender
54(1)
Leadership in Action: The Caring Dictator
55(2)
Individual Differences and Traits
57(39)
Elements of Individual Differences Characteristics
58(3)
Multiple Perspectives and the Impact of the Situation
60(1)
Individual Characteristics Set the Limits
61(1)
Values
61(4)
Value System and Culture
62(3)
Abilities and Skills
65(5)
Intelligence and Emotional Intelligence
65(3)
Creativity
68(1)
Skills
68(2)
Relevant Personality Traits
70(10)
The Big-Five Personality Dimensions
70(2)
Other Individual Personality Traits
72(8)
Using Individual Characteristics
80(1)
Summary and Conclusion
81(1)
Leadership Challenge
82(1)
Review and Discussion Questions
83(1)
Searching the Web
83(1)
Your Ideal Organization
84(1)
Value Systems
85(1)
Emotional Intelligence
86(2)
Locus of Control
88(1)
Type A Behavior Pattern
89(1)
Self-Monitoring
90(1)
MBTI
91(2)
Machiavellianism
93(1)
Leadership in Action: Bonnie Reitz---Helping to Fly Continental
94(2)
Power and Leadership
96(27)
Power in Organizations: Definition and Consequences
97(3)
Consequences of Using Power
97(1)
Distribution of Power
98(2)
Sources of Power
100(7)
Sources of Power Related to Individuals
100(4)
Sources of Power Related to Organizational Structure
104(2)
Special Power Sources of Top Executives
106(1)
The Dark Side of Power: Corruption
107(5)
Causes
108(1)
Consequences
109(1)
Solutions
110(2)
Empowerment: The Changing Face of Power
112(3)
Steps to Empowerment
112(3)
Impact of Empowerment
115(1)
Summary and Conclusion
115(2)
Leadership Challenge
117(1)
Review and Discussion Questions
118(1)
Searching the Web
118(2)
Recognizing Blocks to Empowerment
120
Views of Power
119(2)
Leadership in Action: The Most Powerful Woman in Banking
121(2)
PART II: CONTINGENCY MODELS 123(68)
Contingency Models: Using Resources Effectively
125(35)
Fiedler's Contingency Model
126(8)
Leader's Style
126(2)
Situational Control
128(1)
Predictions of the Contingency Model
129(3)
Evaluation and Applications
132(1)
Using the Contingency Model
133(1)
The Normative Decision Model
134(5)
Leader's Decision Styles
134(2)
Contingency variables: Defining the Problem
136(1)
The Normative Decision Model's Predictions
137(1)
Evaluation and Application
138(1)
Cognitive Resources Theory
139(2)
Leader Characteristics and Contingency Factors
139(1)
CRT's Predictions
139(1)
Evaluation and Application
140(1)
Contingency Models and Culture
141(1)
Summary and Conclusion
142(1)
Leadership Challenge
143(1)
Review and Discussion Questions
144(1)
Searching the Web
144(1)
Changing the Leader's Sit Con
145(2)
Using the Normative Decision Model
147(5)
Creating an Atmosphere That Encourages Participation
152(1)
Determining Your LPC
153(1)
Assessing a Leadership Situation
154(4)
Leadership in Action: The Cosmetic Queen and the Software King
158(2)
Exchange and Relationship Development and Management
160(31)
Path-Goal Theory
161(5)
The Framework
161(2)
Limitations and Applications
163(1)
Attributional Models
163(2)
Limitations and Applications
165(1)
Leader-Member Exchange (LMX)
166(5)
Limitations and Applications
169(2)
Substitutes for Leadership
171(3)
Limitations and Applications
173(1)
Situational Leadership
174(1)
Limitations and Applications
175(1)
Summary and Conclusion
175(3)
Leadership Challenge
178(1)
Review and Discussion Questions
179(1)
Searching the Web
179(2)
Removing Obstacles
181(1)
In-Group/Out-Group
182(2)
Identifying Your In-Group and Out-Group
184(2)
Leadership Substitutes
186(2)
Leadership in Action: The Caring Navy Commander
188(3)
PART III: CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS AND APPLICATIONS 191(96)
Participative Management and Leading Teams
193(29)
When Should Participation Be Used?
194(6)
Criteria for Participation
196(3)
The Role of Culture
199(1)
The Issue of Delegation
200(3)
Benefits of Delegation
200(1)
Guidelines for Good Delegation
201(1)
Why Do Leaders Fail to Delegate?
202(1)
Evolution of Participative Management: Teams and Superleadership
203(4)
Characteristics of Teams
203(1)
Self-Managed Teams
204(3)
Super- and Self-Leadership
207(1)
Role of Leaders in a Team Environment
208(2)
Summary and Conclusion
210(1)
Leadership Challenge
211(1)
Review and Discussion Questions
212(1)
Searching the Web
212(1)
To Delegate or Not to Delegate?
213(2)
Strategies for Becoming a Superleader
215(3)
Delegation Scale
218(1)
Are You a Team Leader?
219(1)
Leadership in Action: Dian Graves Owen
220(2)
Change-Oriented Leadership
222(29)
A Brief History of Charismatic and Transformational Leadership and Its Impact
223(1)
Charismatic Leadership: A Relationship Between Leaders and Followers
224(9)
Characteristics of Charismatic Leaders
224(3)
Characteristics of Followers
227(1)
The Charismatic Situation
228(3)
The Dark Side of Charisma
231(1)
Evaluation and Application
232(1)
Transactional and Transformational Leadership
233(5)
Transactional Leadership
234(1)
Transformational Leadership
235(2)
Evaluation and Application
237(1)
Change-Oriented and Visionary Leadership in the Popular Press
238(4)
Evaluation and Application
241(1)
Summary and Conclusion
242(1)
Leadership Challenge
243(1)
Review and Discussion Questions
244(1)
Searching the Web
244(1)
Do You Know a Charismatic Leader?
245(2)
Charismatic Speech
247(1)
Building Credibility
248(1)
Leadership in Action: Andrea Jung Orchestrates Avon's Makeover
249(2)
The Upper-Echelon View: Strategic Leadership
251(36)
Differences Between Micro and Upper-Echelon Strategic Leadership
252(2)
The Domain and Impact of Strategic Leadership
254(6)
Role of Strategic Leaders
255(1)
Executive Discretion: Moderating Factors of the Rote of Leaders
256(4)
Characteristics of Upper-Echelon Leaders
260(8)
Demographic and Personality Traits
260(2)
Strategic Leadership Types
262(5)
Strategic Leadership: Culture and Gender
267(1)
How Do Executives Affect Their Organization?
268(3)
Direct Decisions
269(1)
Allocation of Resources and Control aver the Reward System
270(1)
Setting the Norms and Modeling
270(1)
Strategic Leaders' Accountability
271(2)
Summary and Conclusion
273(2)
Leadership Challenge
275(1)
Review and Discussion Questions
276(1)
Searching the Web
276(1)
Understanding Strategic Forces
277(3)
Your Organization
280(1)
Influence Processes
281(2)
What Is Your Strategic Leadership Type?
283(2)
Leadership in Action: Fernando Capellan Is Mixing a Social Agenda and Business Success
285(2)
PART IV: LOOKING TOWARD THE FUTURE 287(12)
Looking Toward the Future: What Will We Be When We Grow Up?
289(10)
What We Know and What We Don't Know
290(3)
What Do We Know?
290(1)
What Don't We Know?
291(2)
Changes in the Leadership Context and Its Consequences
293(4)
Changing Context
293(1)
Consequences
294(3)
Looking to the Future
297(2)
References 299(22)
Author Index 321(8)
Subject Index 329

Excerpts

Leading people effectively is a tremendous challenge, a great opportunity, and a serious responsibility. Today's organizations, more than ever, need effective leaders who understand the complexities of our ever-changing global environment; who have the intelligence, sensitivity, and ability to empathize with others; and who can motivate their followers to strive for excellence. We always have been interested in leadership. All civilizations throughout history have focused on their leaders, revering or reviling them. Leaders and followers have existed since humans first organized into groups to accomplish a task. Throughout history, the fate of millions has depended on the leadership qualities of kings and queens and on their battles for succession. Children all over the world learn early, through listening to fairy tales, that the happiness and misery of people depend on the goodness (or evilness) of leaders. We are truly fascinated by those who lead us. To some, leadership is a magical process. Indeed, when we read about historical figures or meet some of the leaders of our times, we can be transfixed by their seemingly magical exploits. They move armies, create new countries, and destroy whole civilizations through what often appears to be the sheer strength of their will. They affect our very existence on this planet. Although our leaders are the ones who dazzle us, we sometimes fail to consider that leaders alone can accomplish nothing. It is the strength of their followers that moves history. It is the hard work of employees that turns a profit in a faltering company It is the initiative of volunteers that achieves an institution's goals. We also must remember that many extraordinary leaders have found themselves shunned and rejected by the people who once admired them. President Charles de Gaulle's road to the leadership of France was long, tortuous, and fraught with failure: After coming to office as a hero after World War II, he was forced out of office twice. Winston Churchill was removed from office twice, too, and faced long periods in his life during which his leadership was neither valued nor wanted. Julius Caesar experienced many ups and downs in his battles with the Roman senate. More recently, Margaret Thatcher saw her fortunes come and go with the mood of the British public and the economic upheaval in Europe. Henry Cisneros, once mayor of San Antonio and secretary of housing and urban development under President Clinton, fell into disfavor with the electorate before he regained his popularity. Benazir Butho of Pakistan has moved. from national hero to national villain several times. Lee Iaccoca of Chrysler was not always the hero that some consider him to be today. George Watson Jr. was booted out of office after successfully leading IBM for many years. Jack Welch, recently retired from the leadership of General Electric and considered by many to be one of the most successful U.S. CEOs, was nicknamed Neutron Jack in his early days at GE for decimating the company workforce through layoffs. If the powers of these leaders are truly magical, why do they wax and wane? Why are they not effective all the time? This question, along with many others, will be addressed in this book. For our organizations to be effective and for our society to function successfully, we must be able to select the right leaders and help them succeed. This book presents a broad review and analysis of the field of leadership with application to business and other organizations because the processes of leading others to achieve organizational goals are applicable in any institutional setting. Our current research has done much to demystify leadership and teach it to the rest of us mortals. Although we still come across some leaders whose performance and behavior escape the bounds of scientific explanation, by and large we know a good deal about leadership and how to train people to be leaders. The cornerstone of our new knowl


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...