9780719059742

The Atlantic Economy Britain, the Us and Ireland

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780719059742

  • ISBN10:

    0719059747

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2001-08-09
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press

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Summary

This remarkable book examines how the economic power of Britain and the US limits the opportunities for small states to develop. Following the history of the Atlantic economy since the 16th century, Denis O'Hearn shows how Ireland's repeated attempts to industrialize were frustrated by British and American power. After partition, Ireland tried to industrialize but was transformed into a platform for US companies seeking access to European markets. Irish attempts to follow the development paths of the wealthier Atlantic regions were limited by power structures, many of which were created when it was integrated into the Atlantic economy in the 16th and 17th centuries. Explaining the problems of economic growth and industrialization from the perspectives of both the developed and developing countries, this book addresses the most important question in developmental politics--how can a developing country emerge from a historical cycle of underdevelopment?

Author Biography

Denis O'Hearn is Reader in Sociology at Queen's University, Belfast and Chair of the West Belfast Economic Forum.

Table of Contents

List of tables and figures
ix
Preface xi
List of abbreviations
xiii
Global power and local economic change
1(27)
Studying local change in a global context
2(5)
Systemic accumulation, hegemony and incorporated local history
7(5)
Global change and moments of local change
12(5)
Effects on local societies: exploitation and marginalisation
17(5)
Capital dependency, externalities and the reproduction of the global hierarchy
22(1)
What am I looking for?
23(5)
Incorporation and before
28(25)
Irish society
28(2)
Ireland as contact periphery
30(2)
The emerging Atlantic project and the context of effective incorporation
32(5)
Effective incorporation
37(12)
Conclusions: effective incorporation as the basis for peripheralisation
49(4)
The first cycle of industrial transformation: wool to linen
53(27)
An early transformation and a new problem: cattle to provisions and sheep
53(9)
The first industrial transformation: wool to linen
62(5)
Characteristics and evolution of the linen industry
67(3)
The process of linen production
70(5)
Conclusions: initial industrial transformations
75(5)
The second cycle of industrial transformation: cotton to linen
80(28)
Cotton and English supremacy
82(2)
Access to the raw material and innovation
84(1)
Innovation in British and peripheralisation in Irish cotton
85(4)
Spinning and weaving: creative and adaptive responses
89(3)
British supremacy and the collapse of Irish cotton
92(3)
Linen
95(7)
North-eastern industrial concentration and general Irish peripheralisation
102(2)
Conclusions: the concentration and reperipheralisation of industry
104(4)
The third cycle of industrial transformation: import substitution to export-oriented industrialisation
108(32)
Decolonisation and US hegemony
109(4)
Political independence and protection
113(6)
Forces for change
119(3)
Regime proposals for change
122(2)
Enter the world economy
124(6)
The significance of crisis
130(2)
The crisis and Irish capital
132(2)
Conclusions: shifting hegemony and short-lived self-sufficiency
134(6)
The transformed industry: foreign investment
140(27)
Maturing US hegemony: outward movement of capital
140(2)
Foreign investment and Irish industry
142(6)
The transformed industry: engine of modernity or another peripheralisation?
148(11)
The other Irish economy: northern decline
159(2)
Conclusions: again on innovation and industrial transformation
161(6)
Riding the new economy: from green donkey to Celtic tiger
167(29)
Restructuring, the `new economy' and Irish recovery
169(5)
Economic growth rates
174(2)
Profit shifting
176(1)
The indigenous economy: following the European path?
177(9)
The TNC profits explosion and inequality
186(4)
Conclusions: evaluating the Celtic tiger
190(6)
Comparing cycles of peripheral economic change
196(18)
Economic cycles, hegemonic change and patterns of industrialisation
196(4)
Irish industry in a restructured Europe: what has changed?
200(2)
Industrial cycles and innovation
202(8)
Historical paths: self-reinforcing or breakable?
210(2)
Conclusions: the limitations of dependent growth
212(2)
References 214(17)
Index 231

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