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Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing,9780130889782
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Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780130889782

ISBN10:
0130889784
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2008
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $164.00

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Summary

For advanced undergraduate/ graduate-level courses in Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing. This exploration of the technical and engineering aspects of automated production systems provides the most advanced, comprehensive, and balanced coverage of the subject of any text on the market. It covers all the major cutting-edge technologies of production automation and material handling, and how these technologies are used to construct modern manufacturing systems.

Table of Contents

Introduction
1(23)
Production System Facilities
2(5)
Manufacturing Support Systems
7(2)
Automation in Production Systems
9(5)
Manual Labor in Production Systems
14(3)
Automation Principles and Strategies
17(4)
Organization of the Book
21(3)
Manufacturing Operations
24(37)
Manufacturing Industries and Products
28(3)
Manufacturing Operations
31(4)
Product/Production Relationships
35(5)
Production Concepts and Mathematical Models
40(8)
Costs of Manufacturing Operations
48(13)
PART I: AUTOMATION AND CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES 61
Introduction to Automation
66
Basic Elements of an Automated System
63
Advanced Automation Functions
71
Levels of Automation
76
Industrial Control Systems
79
Process Industries versus Discrete Manufacturing Industries
80
Continuous versus Discrete Control
82
Computer Process Control
88
Forms of Computer Process Control
96
Sensors, Actuators, and Other Control System Components
107
Sensors
108
Actuators
111
Analog-to-Digital Conversion
112
Digital-to-Analog Conversion
115
Input/Output Devices for Discrete Data
117
Numerical Control
120
Fundamentals of NC Technology
122
Computer Numerical Control
128
DNC
134
Applications of Numerical Control
137
NC Part Programming
145
Engineering Analysis of NC Positioning Systems
179
Appendix: APT Word Definitions
196
Industrial Robotics
210
Robot Anatomy and Related Attributes
212
Robot Control Systems
218
End Effectors
220
Sensors in Robotics
222
Industrial Robot Applications
222
Robot Programming
230
Engineering Analysis of Industrial Robots
240
Discrete Control Using Programmable Logic Controllers and Personal Computers
257
Discrete Process Control
257
Ladder Logic Diagrams
264
Programmable Logic Controllers
268
Personal Computers Using Soft Logic
275
Part II: MATERIAL HANDLING AND IDENTIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES
Introduction to Material Handling
281
Overview of Material Handling Equipment
282
Considerations in Material Handling System Design
285
The 10 Principles of Material Handling
288
Material Transport Systems
292
Industrial Trucks
293
Automated Guided Vehicle Systems
295
Monorails and Other Rail Guided Vehicles
302
Conveyor Systems
303
Cranes and Hoits
309
Analysis of Material Transport Systems
311
Storage Systems
328
Storage System Performance
329
Storage Location Strategies
331
Conventional Storage Methods and Equipment
332
Automated Storage Systems
335
Engineering Analysis of Storage Systems
344
Automatic Data Capture
357
Overview of Automatic Identification Methods
358
Bar Code Technology
361
Other A DC Technologies
370
PART III: MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS
Introduction to Manufacturing Systems
375
Components of a Manufacturing System
376
Classification of Manufacturing Systems
381
Overview of the Classification Scheme
388
Manufacturing Progress Functions (Learning Curves)
392
Single Station Manufacturing Cells
397
Single Station Manned Workstations
398
Single Station Automated Cells
399
Applications
404
Analysis of Single Station Cells
409
Group Technology and Cellular Manufacturing
420
Part Families
422
Parts Classification and Coding
425
Production Flow Analysis
431
Cellular Manufacturing
434
Application Considerations in Group Technology
439
Quantitative Analysis in Cellular Manufacturing
442
Flexible Manufacturing Systems
460
What is an FMS?
462
FMS Components
469
FMS Applications and Benefits
480
FMS Planning and Implementation Issues
485
Quantitative Analysis of Flexible Manufacturing Systems
487
Manual Assembly Lines
514
Fundamentals of Manual Assembly Lines
516
Alternative Assembly Systems
523
Design for Assembly
524
Analysis of Single Model Assembly Lines
525
Line Balancing Algorithms
534
Mixed Model Assembly Lines
540
Other Considerations in Assembly Line Design
552
Transfer Lines and Similar Automated Manufacturing Systems
566
Fundamentals of Automated Production Lines
565
Applications of Automated Production Lines
575
Analysis of Transfer Lines with No Internal Storage
579
Analysis of Transfer Lines with Storage Buffers
587
Automated Assembly Systems
601
Fundamentals of Automated Assembly Systems
602
Design for Automated Assembly
606
Quantitative Analysis of Assembly Systems
610
PART IV: QUALITY CONTROL SYSTEMS
Introduction to Quality Assurance
631
Quality Defined
633
Traditional and Modern Quality Control
635
Taguchi Methods in Quality Engineering
638
ISO 9000
648
Statistical Process Control
654
Process Variability and Process Capability
655
Control Charts
658
Other SPC Tools
667
Implementing Statistical Process Control
672
Inspection Principles and Practices
681
Inspection Fundamentals
682
Sampling versus 100% Inspection
687
Automated Inspection
692
When and Where to Inspect
694
Quantitative Analysis of Inspection
698
Inspection Technologies
711
Inspection Metrology
712
Contact versus Noncontact Inspection Techniques
717
Conventional Measuring and Gaging Techniques
718
Coordinate Measuring Machines
720
Surface Measurement
736
Machine Vision
738
Other Optical Inspection Techniques
745
Noncontact Nonoptical Inspection Technologies
747
PART V: MANUFACTURING SUPPORT SYSTEMS
Product Design and CAD/CAM in the Production System
753
Product Design and CAD
755
CAD System Hardware
761
CAM, CAD/CAM, and CIM
764
Quality Function Deployment
767
Process Planning and Concurrent Engineering
775
Process Planning
776
Computer-Aided Process Planning (CAPP)
782
Concurrent Engineering and Design for Manufacturing
785
Advanced Manufacturing Planning
791
Production Planning and Control Systems
796
Aggregate Production Planning and the Master Production Schedule
798
Material Requirements Planning (MRP)
800
Capacity Planning
806
Shop Floor Control
808
Inventory Control
814
Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP II)
822
Just-In-Time Production Systems
823
Lean Production and Agile Manufacturing
832
Lean Production
833
Agile Manufacturing
835
Comparison of Lean and Agile
843

Excerpts

Preface The first edition of this book was published in 1980 under the titleAutomation, Production Systems, and Computer-Aided Manufacturing.A revision was published in 1987 with about 200 more pages and a slightly different title:Automation, Production Systems, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing.The additional pages expanded the coverage of topics like industrial robotics, programmable logic controllers, material handling and storage, and quality control. But much of the book was very similar to the 1980 text. By the time I started work on the current volume (technically the second edition of the 1987 title, but in fact the third generation of the 1980 publication), it was clear that the book was in need of a thorough rewriting. New technologies had been developed and existing technologies had advanced, new theories and methodologies had emerged in the research literature, and my own understanding of automation and production systems had grown and matured (at least I think so). Readers of the two previous books will find this new volume to be quite different from its predecessors. Its organization is significantly changed, new topics have been added, and some topics from the previous editions have been discarded or reduced in coverage. It is not an exaggeration to say that the entire text has been rewritten (readers will find very few instances where I have used the same wording as in the previous editions). Nearly all of the figures are new. It is essentially a new book. There is a risk in changing the book so much. Both of the previous editions have been very successful for Prentice Hall and me. Many instructors have adopted the book and have become accustomed to its organization and coverage. Many courses have been developed based on the book. What will these instructors think of the new edition, with all of its new and different features? My hope is that they will try out the new book and find it to be a significant improvement over the 1987 edition, as well as any other textbook on the subject. Specifically, what are the changes in this new edition? To begin with, the organization has been substantially revised. Following two introductory chapters, the book is organized into five main parts: Automation and control technologies:Six chapters on automation, industrial computer control, control system components, numerical control, industrial robotics, and programmable logic controllers. Material handling technologies:Four chapters covering conventional and automated material handling systems (e.g., conveyor systems and automated guided vehicle systems), conventional and automated storage systems, and automatic identification and data capture. Manufacturing systems:Seven chapters on a manufacturing systems taxonomy, single station cells, group technology, flexible manufacturing systems, manual assembly lines, transfer lines, and automated assembly. Quality control systems:Four chapters covering quality assurance, statistical process control, inspection principles, and inspection technologies (e.g., coordinate measuring machines and machine vision). Manufacturing support systems:Four chapters on product design and CAD/CAM, process planning, production planning and control, and lean production and agile manufacturing. Other changes in organization and coverage in the current edition, compared with the 1987 book, include: Expanded coverage of automation fundamentals, numerical control programming, group technology, flexible manufacturing systems, material handling and storage, quality control and inspection, inspection technologies, programmable logic controllers. New chapters or sections on manufacturing systems, single station manufacturing systems, mixed-model assembly line analysis, quality assurance and statistical process control, Taguchi methods,


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