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The Aztecs, 2nd Edition

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780631230168

ISBN10:
0631230165
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
11/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Wiley-Blackwell

Summary

This book is a vivid and comprehensive account of the Aztecs, the best-known people of pre-Columbian America. It examines their origins, civilization, and the distinctive realms of Aztec religion, science, and thought. It describes the conquest of their empire by the Spanish, and the fate of their descendants to the present day in Central Mexico, making use of the results of the latest excavations, historical documentation, and the author's first-hand knowledge. There is also a fascinating and detailed account of the daily life of the Aztec people, including their economy, family life, class system, and food. This second edition updates the original text with new descriptions of major archaeological sites such as Malinalco and Tlatelolco and expanded coverage of codices, religion, and areas distant from the capital. Dozens of photographs and illustrations have been added for this edition, making this the most informative and up-to-date treatment of Aztec civilization.

Author Biography

Michael E. Smith is Professor of Anthropology at the State University of New York at Albany. He has directed excavations at numerous Aztec sites and is co-editor (with Marilyn Masson) of The Ancient Civilizations of Mesoamerica: A Reader (Blackwell, 1999).

Table of Contents

List of Figures
xi
List of Tables
xv
Preface xvi
Guide to Pronunciation and Spelling xix
The Aztecs of Mesoamerica
1(27)
Who Were the Aztecs?
3(2)
Mesoamerican Context
5(2)
The Aztec Environment
7(5)
Sources of Information
12(1)
Ethnohistory
12(7)
Archaeology
19(7)
Art History
26(1)
Aztec Studies Today
26(2)
Box: Reading a Ritual Codex
15(13)
The Rise of Aztec Civilization
28(28)
Timetables
29(2)
Pre-Aztec Civilizations
31(3)
The Aztlan Migrations
34(3)
The Growth of City-States: The Early Aztec Period
37(6)
Tenochtitlan and Empire: The Late Aztec Period
43(13)
Box: Reading a Historical Codex
52(4)
People on the Landscape
56(22)
How Many Aztecs?
57(3)
The Aztec Diet
60(5)
Farming Systems
65(8)
Rural Settlement
73(4)
The Rural Landscape
77(1)
Artisans and their Wares
78(28)
Utilitarian Crafts
78(14)
Luxury Crafts
92(8)
Otumba: An Aztec Craft Center
100(6)
The Commerical Economy
106(19)
Marketplaces
107(5)
Merchants
112(3)
Money
115(2)
Material Evidence for Aztec Commerce
117(8)
Family and Social Class
125(22)
Growing up Aztec
126(3)
Adult Life and Social Roles
129(2)
Social Classes
131(1)
Commoners
132(7)
Nobles and their Palaces
139(8)
City-State and Empire
147(25)
City-States
148(3)
Relations among City-States
151(5)
The Empire of the Triple Alliance
156(2)
Imperial Strategies and Control
158(12)
Mexica Propaganda and the Limits of Empire
170(2)
Cities and Urban Planning
172(20)
City-State Capitals
173(4)
Provincial Cities and Towns
177(6)
Tenochtitlan
183(9)
Creation, Death, and the Gods
192(20)
Myths of Creation
193(3)
Aztec Religion: Historical Background
196(3)
The Gods
199(7)
Death, Burial, and the Afterlife
206(6)
Temples and Ceremonies
212(26)
Priests
212(3)
Human Blood Offerings
215(5)
The Templo Mayor
220(9)
Public Ceremonies
229(4)
Private Rituals
233(5)
Science and Art
238(30)
Writing
239(7)
Calendars and Astronomy
246(7)
Technology
253(1)
Medicine
254(2)
Art
256(6)
Literature and Poetry
262(3)
Music and Dance
265(3)
Box: Glyphs from the Codex Mendoza
244(24)
Final Glory, Conquest, and Legacy
268(26)
The Final Century: 1428-1519
269(3)
Conquest by Spain
272(7)
The Nahuas under Spanish Rule
279(6)
Continuity and Change
285(2)
The Aztec Legacy: Modern Nahua Indian Culture
287(2)
The Aztec Past and the Mexican Present
289(3)
A Wider Perspective
292(2)
Notes 294(25)
Glossary of Nahuatl Terms 319(2)
References 321(34)
Index 355


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