CART

(0) items

Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate : From Policy Practice to Social Justice,9780534527709
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate : From Policy Practice to Social Justice

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780534527709

ISBN10:
0534527701
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
6/12/2002
Publisher(s):
Brooks Cole

Related Products


  • Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate
    Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate
  • Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate : From Policy Practice to Social Justice
    Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate : From Policy Practice to Social Justice
  • Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate : From Policy Practice to Social Justice
    Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate : From Policy Practice to Social Justice
  • Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate, 6th Edition
    Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate, 6th Edition
  • Brooks/Cole Empowerment Series: Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate
    Brooks/Cole Empowerment Series: Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate
  • Social Policy : From Theory to Policy Practice
    Social Policy : From Theory to Policy Practice
  • WebTutor on Blackboard Instant Access Code for Jansson's Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate
    WebTutor on Blackboard Instant Access Code for Jansson's Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate
  • WebTutor on WebCT Instant Access Code for Jansson's Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate
    WebTutor on WebCT Instant Access Code for Jansson's Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate





Summary

Part I: BECOMING MOTIVATED TO BECOME A POLICY ADVOCATE: POLICY PRACTICE AND POLICY ADVOCACY AS THE FOURTH DIMENSION OF SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE. 1. Joining a Tradition of Social Reform. 2. Articulating Four Rationales Participating in Policy Advocacy. Part II: SURMOUNTING CYNICISM BY DEVELOPING POLICYADVOCACY SKILLS. 3. Obtaining Skills and Competencies for Policy Advocacy. 4. Understanding the Ecology of Policy in Governmental, Electoral, Community, and Agency Settings. Part III: COMMITTING TO PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS. 5. Committing to an Issue: Building Agendas. 6. Committing to a Solution: Analyzing Problems. 7. Developing Policy Proposals. 8. Presenting and Defending Policy Proposals. Part IV: ADVOCATING FOR CHANGE. 9. Developing and Using Power. 10. Developing Political Strategy. 11. Putting Political Strategy into Action. 12. Ballot-Based Policy Advocacy. Part V: TROUBLESHOOTING POLICIES. 13. Troubleshooting Policies. 14. Assessing Policies. Appendix.

Table of Contents

PART 1 Becoming Motivated to Become a Policy Advocate: Policy Practice and Policy Advocacy as the Fourth Dimension of Social Work Practice
Joining a Tradition of Social Reform
2(32)
Diversity and Policy Advocacy
2(6)
Advancing the Public Interest at Home and Abroad
8(1)
Using an Ecological Perspective
8(1)
What Policy Practitioners and Advocates Seek to Change
9(4)
What Are Policy Practice and Policy Advocacy?
13(1)
Challenges Encountered by Policy Advocates
14(4)
Joining a Tradition of Policy Advocacy
18(3)
Joining the Reform Tradition Within Social Work
21(1)
Policy Devolution, Technology, and Policy Advocacy
22(1)
Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate
23(5)
Developing a Vision
23(1)
Seeking Opportunities for Policy Advocacy
24(1)
Taking Sensible Risks
25(1)
Balancing Flexibility with Planning
25(1)
Developing Multiple Skills
26(1)
Being Persistent
27(1)
Tolerating Uncertainty
27(1)
Becoming a Policy Advocate
28(1)
Combining Pragmatism with Principle
28(1)
The Rewards of Policy Advocacy
28(2)
Changing the Composition of Decision Makers
30(1)
Getting Started
31(1)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
32(1)
Notes
32(1)
Suggested Readings
33(1)
Articulating Four Rationales for Participating in Policy Advocacy
34(33)
The Ethical Rationale for Policy Advocacy
34(17)
Beneficence and Professional Practice
35(1)
Policy-Sensitive and Policy-Related Practice
36(2)
Moving Toward Policy Advocacy
38(2)
Policy Advocacy and Powerless Groups
40(4)
Policy Advocacy for Out-Groups
44(4)
Other Ethical Principles in Policy Advocacy
48(1)
Other Types of Ethical Reasoning
49(1)
Toward an Eclectic Approach to Ethical Reasoning
50(1)
Returning to Ideology
51(3)
The Analytic Rationale for Policy Advocacy
54(2)
Choosing Sides: Controversy and Research
56(4)
The Political Rationale for Policy Advocacy
60(3)
Interlocking Rationales for Policy Advocacy
63(1)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
64(1)
Notes
64(3)
Suggested Readings
66(1)
PART 2 Surmounting Cynicism by Developing Policy-Advocacy Skills 67(72)
Obtaining Skills and Competencies for Policy Advocacy
68(33)
A Policy Practice Framework
69(1)
The Policy Context
69(1)
Perspectives of Stakeholders and Policy Advocates
70(11)
Patterns of Participation
72(1)
The Six Tasks of Policy Practitioners
73(1)
Four Skills That Policy Practitioners Need
74(1)
Policy Competencies
75(3)
Styles of Policy Practice
78(3)
Applications of Policy Tasks and Skills
81(4)
Building Agendas
81(1)
Analyzing Problems
82(1)
Writing Proposals
83(1)
Enacting Policy
83(1)
Implementing Policy
84(1)
Assessing Policy
84(1)
Analyzing Policy Practice
85(1)
Describing Policy Practice: A Case Example
86(4)
The Context
86(1)
The Policy Tasks
87(1)
Using Skills to Accomplish Policy Tasks
88(2)
Ballot-Based Advocacy
90(1)
The Variety of Policies
91(1)
Overcoming Discomfort with Power
92(2)
Social Policy's Role in Ecological Frameworks
94(1)
Policy Practice as a Unifying Theme
94(1)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
94(5)
Notes
99(1)
Suggested Readings
100(1)
Understanding the Ecology of Policy in Governmental Electoral, Community, and Agency Settings
101(38)
The Players in Legislative and Governmental Settings
101(12)
Elected Officials
102(8)
Unelected Officials or Bureaucrats
110(1)
Lobbyists and Interest Groups
111(1)
Connections Among Interest Groups, Legislators, and Bureaucrats
112(1)
Public Opinion
112(1)
The Electoral Process
113(2)
Early Maneuvering
113(1)
Running Campaigns
114(1)
The MindSets of Elected Officials
115(4)
The Environment of Public Servants: Elected Officials
116(1)
Shortcuts: Aides, Lobbyists, and Priorities
117(1)
The Calculus of Choice
117(2)
The MindSets of Nonelected Officials
119(1)
Political Appointees
119(1)
Civil Servants
120(1)
Strategy in Legislative Settings
120(1)
The Political Economy of Social Agencies
121(4)
The Political Economy of Programs and Social Work Units
125(1)
Mapping Agencies' Policies
126(4)
The Players in Organizational Settings
130(3)
The Organizational Chart
131(1)
Budget Priorities
132(1)
Boundary Spanners and Mission Enhancers
132(1)
Informal Relationships among Organizational Members
132(1)
The Political Economy of Communities
133(1)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
134(1)
Notes
134(3)
Suggested Readings
137(2)
PART 3 Committing to Problems and Solutions 139(148)
Committing to an Issue: Building Agendas
140(28)
Taking the First Step
141(1)
Why Agenda Building Is Needed
142(3)
Legislatures
142(1)
State Legislative Information
143(1)
Agencies
144(1)
Communities
145(1)
Three Challenges in Agenda Building
145(13)
The Diagnosing Stage
148(3)
The Softening Stage
151(3)
The Activating Stage
154(2)
Coupling
156(1)
Framing and Finding Titles
157(1)
Negotiating and Bargaining
157(1)
Assembling Early Sponsers and Supporters
157(1)
Routing
157(1)
Media Coverage
158(1)
Can Direct-Service Staff Help to Build Agendas?
158(1)
Policy Advocacy for Powerless Populations and Unpopular Issues
159(1)
Electoral Processes
159(1)
Developing Links with Advocacy Groups
160(1)
Using Multiple Skills in Agenda Building
161(5)
Diagnosing the Context
163(1)
Activation Stage
164(2)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
166(1)
Notes
166(1)
Suggested Readings
167(1)
Commiting to a Solution: Analyzing Problems
168(42)
Developing and Defending Policy Proposals
168(1)
Putting It All Together
169(1)
Do Policy Advocates Have to Analyze Problems?
170(3)
Using a Flowchart to Analyze Problems
173(5)
Five Cells in a Flowchart Format
173(5)
Illustrating a Flowchart with Welfare Reform
178(4)
The Causes of Social Problems
182(2)
Developing Interventions and Programs
184(8)
Preventive Programs
187(5)
Measuring the Magnitude of Problems
192(2)
Locating Problems Spatially
194(2)
Assessing Policy Reforms
196(2)
Social Problems as Slippery Concepts
198(4)
When Are Social Problems Real and When Are They Invented?
198(1)
Many Social Problems Defy Simple Solutions, But Many People Favor Panaceas
199(1)
Priorities Are Not Chosen Rationally
200(1)
Solving One Problem Can Create Others
200(1)
Variations in Problems
201(1)
Challenges for Policy Advocates
202(1)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
203(4)
Notes
207(2)
Suggested Reading
209(1)
Developing Policy Proposals
210(38)
Intersecting Arenas and Stakeholders
210(3)
Recurring Policy Issues and Policy Options
213(19)
Establishing a Mission
213(1)
Designing the Structure of Service
214(2)
Planning the Extent of Devolution and the Resource Path
216(8)
Defining Services
224(3)
Rationing Scarce Resources
227(2)
Addressing Agency Network Issues
229(2)
Addressing Community Factors
231(1)
Guiding and Overseeing Policy Implementation
231(1)
Assessing Implemented Policies
232(1)
An Overview of the Proposal to Fund Shelters for Battered Women
232(1)
The Anatomy of Policy Proposals
232(8)
Trade-Offs: Systematically Comparing Policy Options
235(1)
Identifying Options
235(1)
Selecting and Weighing Criteria
236(1)
Creating a Decision-Making Matrix
237(2)
Qualitative Ratings
239(1)
Linking Policy Skills
240(3)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
243(1)
Notes
243(3)
Suggested Readings
246(2)
Presenting and Defending Policy Proposals
248(39)
Ideology and Policy Positions
249(1)
Proposals and Ideology
249(1)
Electoral Politics and Proposals
250(1)
Combative Persuasion
251(5)
Adversarial Debates
251(3)
Coercive Messages
254(1)
Negotiations: Hardball and Win-Win Options
255(1)
Adversarial or Friendly Communication: Which Is Preferable?
256(1)
Persuading Specific Audiences
257(3)
Determining Objectives
257(1)
Diagnosing Audiences
258(2)
Strategies of Persuasion
260(7)
Selecting a Medium
260(1)
Using a Sequence of Presentations
261(1)
Selecting a Format
261(4)
Developing an Effective Presentation Style
265(1)
Tactics for Specific Audiences
265(1)
Other Tactical Choices
266(1)
Assembling a Strategy
267(6)
The Hostile Audience
267(1)
The Sympathetic Audience with Some Hostile Members
268(1)
The Expert Audience
268(1)
Interpersonal Discussions
269(4)
Writing Succinct Policy Memos
273(4)
Gaining Support for Grant Proposals
277(7)
Writing an Imaginative Title
277(1)
Giving a Compelling Rationale
277(1)
Drawing on Research Findings
277(1)
Setting Clear Objectives
278(1)
Including an Evaluation Component
278(1)
Demonstrating Feasibility
278(1)
Establishing Partnerships
278(1)
Demonstrating Support
278(1)
Developing a Realistic Budget
279(1)
Finding Funders
279(1)
Revising the Proposal
280(4)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
284(1)
Notes
285(1)
Suggested Readings
286(1)
PART 4 Advocating for Change 287(120)
Developing and Using Power
288(39)
In Defense of Politics
289(1)
Analytic and Political Approaches to Policy Advocacy
290(5)
The Nature of Power
295(1)
Person-to-Person Power
296(2)
Substantive Power
298(1)
Using Indirect Power
299(4)
Power in Decision-Making Procedures
300(1)
Process Power
301(1)
Shaping Contexts
302(1)
Successful Power Users
303(1)
Power in Organizations
304(3)
Discretion, Compliance, and Whistle-Blowing
304(1)
Defining Zones of Discretion
304(1)
Issues of Compliance
305(1)
Whistle-Blowing
306(1)
Exerting External Pressure
307(1)
Power Differentials
307(2)
Ethical Issues
309(1)
Developing and Using Power
309(5)
Obtaining Power Resources
314(5)
Building Personal Credibility
314(3)
Networking
317(2)
Out-Group Members' Problems
319(1)
Developing Assertiveness
320(1)
Can Direct-Service Staff Use Power Resources?
321(1)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
322(1)
Notes
322(4)
Suggested Readings
326(1)
Developing Political Strategy
327(18)
Establishing Some Objectives
327(5)
Determining a Position
327(5)
Selecting the Extent of Policy Changes
332(1)
Selecting a Time Frame
332(1)
Grounding Strategy in Current Realities
332(6)
The Power Distribution
332(3)
Identifying Contextual Factors
335(1)
Past Stances
335(1)
Vested Interests
336(1)
Cohesion of Likely Opponents and Proponents
336(1)
Situational Realities
336(1)
Predicting Future Developments
337(1)
Adapting Strategy to the Setting
338(1)
Building Scenarios to Construct Political Strategy
338(2)
Developing Alternative Scenarios
338(1)
Selecting a Strategy
339(1)
Revising a Strategy
340(1)
Seven Recurring Steps in Strategy
340(3)
Organizing a Team or Coalition
341(1)
Establishing Policy Goals
341(1)
Specifying a Proposal's Content and Getting Early Sponsors
342(1)
Establishing a Style
342(1)
Selecting Power Resources and Framing Strategy
342(1)
Implementing Strategy
342(1)
Revising the Strategy
342(1)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
343(1)
Notes
343(1)
Suggested Readings
344(1)
Putting Political Strategy into Action
345(30)
Strategy in Legislative Settings
346(1)
Organizing Legislative Advocacy Projects from Scratch
346(10)
Organizing a Team or Coalition
346(1)
Establishing Policy Goals in a Legislative Context
347(1)
Specifying a Proposal's Content and Getting Early Sponsors
347(1)
Establishing a Style
348(1)
Selecting Power Resources and Framing Strategy
348(1)
Implementing Strategy
349(7)
Revising the Strategy
356(1)
Strategy in Agency Settings
356(4)
Organizing a Team or Coalition
356(1)
Establishing Policy Goals in the Organizational Context
356(3)
Specifying a Proposal's Content
359(1)
Establishing a Style
359(1)
Selecting Power Resources and Framing Strategy
360(1)
Revising the Strategy
360(1)
Developing Strategy in Community Settings
360(8)
Organizing a Task Group
361(4)
Policy Advocates' Roles in Task Groups
365(1)
What Successful Task Groups Need
365(1)
The Task Group's Mission
366(1)
The Task Group's Leadership
366(1)
The Task Group's Developmental Needs
366(1)
The Task Group's Procedures
367(1)
The Task Group's Structure
367(1)
The Task Group's Deliberative and International Processes
367(1)
The Task Group's Staff and Resources
368(1)
Forming Coalitions
368(1)
Establishing Networks
369(2)
Addressing Dysfunctional Group Processes
369(2)
Establishing Policy Goals in the Community Context
371(1)
Specifying a Proposal's Content
371(1)
Establishing a Style
371(1)
Selecting Power Resources and Framing Strategy
372(1)
Revising the Strategy
372(1)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
372(1)
Notes
372(3)
Engaging in Ballot-Based Policy Advocacy
375(32)
Why Ballot-Based Policy Advocacy Is Important
375(6)
Policy Advocacy in the Electoral Process
381(1)
Developing Population Profiles
381(2)
Using Power Resources to Persuade Voters
383(7)
Using One-on-One Power Resources
384(1)
Using the Media
385(1)
Interacting with Opposing Candidates in Public Forums
385(1)
Developing Positions on Issues and Demonstrating Positive Personal Qualities
385(2)
Concluding Negative Attacks on Opponents
387(1)
Getting Out the Vote
388(1)
Securing Endorsements
389(1)
Convincing Other Potential Candidates Not to Run
389(1)
Gaining Support from Party, Trade Union, and Other Groups
389(1)
Finding Resources
390(1)
Creating a Campaign Organization
391(1)
Developing Campaign Strategy
392(2)
Strategy Options at the Outset of a Campaign
392(1)
Strategy During the Mid-Phase of a Campaign
393(1)
Conducting Issue-Oriented Campaigns
394(1)
Making Issue Campaigns and Electoral Politics Intersect
395(1)
Participating in Electoral and Issue-Oriented Campaigns
396(4)
Deciding to Run for Office
400(4)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
404(1)
Notes
404(2)
Suggested Readings
406(1)
PART 5 Troubleshooting and Assessing Policies 407(50)
Troubleshooting Policies
408(32)
A Framework for Implementing Policy
409(15)
Policy Innovations
410(3)
Oversight Organizations and Staff
413(1)
Primary Implementing Organizations
414(2)
Interorganizational Processes
416(3)
Implementing Processes
419(1)
The Context of Implementation
420(3)
Actual Outputs: The Evaluation of Implemented Policies
423(1)
Reforming the Implementation Process
424(2)
Do Policy Advocates Ever Sabotage Policies?
426(1)
A Case Example of Implementation: The Patient Self-Determination Act of 1990
427(6)
The Policy Innovation
427(1)
Context of the Patient Self-Determination Act
428(2)
Oversight Organizations
430(1)
Implementing Processes
430(2)
Perceptions of Policy Outcomes
432(1)
Advocates' Options for Reforming the Implementation of PSDA
433(2)
Changing the Content of the Policy
433(1)
Changing the Context
433(1)
Changing Actions of Oversight Agencies
434(1)
Changing Implementation Processes
434(1)
Improving Interorganizational Collaboration
435(1)
Securing Evaluations of Policy Outcomes
435(1)
Participating in Community-Based Advocacy Projects
435(1)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
435(1)
Notes
436(3)
Suggested Readings
439(1)
Assessing Policies
440(17)
Assessing Policies
441(1)
The Fundamental Logic of Policy Assessment
441(1)
Similarities Between Assessing and Analyzing Policy
442(2)
Similarities Between Policy Assessment and Policy Debates
444(2)
Tools for Countering Criticism
446(3)
Barriers to the Use of Policy and Program Evaluation
449(3)
Qualitative Evaluations
452(1)
Policy Advocates' Use of Data
453(1)
Why All Social Workers Should Assess Policies
453(1)
Chapter Summary: What You Can Now Do
454(1)
Notes
454(2)
Suggested Readings
456(1)
Name Index 457(3)
Subject Index 460


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...