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The Beginnings of Writing,9780205145188

The Beginnings of Writing

by ; ; ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780205145188

ISBN10:
0205145183
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
10/22/1992
Publisher(s):
Pearson
List Price: $115.60

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Summary

The Beginnings of Writing, Third Edition is the best illustrated single source on young children's writing development--from scribbles and invented spelling to composition. This new edition provides the most careful attention to children's development--to what the children are trying to do as they write. It improves on the earlier editions with more teaching suggestions for emergent literacy and detailed guidelines for making reading-writing connections in a productive learning environment.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
A Child Discovers How to Write
1(16)
How Children Learn to Talk
3(4)
How Children Learn to Write
7(6)
What's to Learn about Writing?
13(1)
Conclusion
14(1)
Endnotes
15(2)
PART ONE The Beginnings of Writing 17(38)
The Precursors of Writing
19(18)
Early Writing and a Theory of Perception
20(2)
How Children Perceive Writing
22(1)
The Recurring Principle
23(1)
The Generative Principle
24(1)
The Sign Concept
25(3)
The Flexibility Principle
28(3)
Linear Principles and Principles of Page Arrangement
31(4)
Spaces between Words
35(1)
Conclusion
36(1)
Endnotes
36(1)
What Children Do with Early Graphics
37(18)
How Writing Systems Are Organized
37(5)
Symbols for Ideas: Ideographic Writing
38(1)
Symbols for Syllables: Syllabic Writing
39(2)
Symbols for Small Units of Sound: Alphabetic Writing
41(1)
The Evolution of Children's Writing Strategies
42(4)
Writing Your Own Name
43(3)
Strategies for Early Writing
46(7)
The Inventory Principle
47(1)
Encouraging Children to Make Print
48(5)
Conclusion
53(1)
Endnotes
54(1)
PART TWO The Beginnings of Spelling 55(66)
Invented Spelling
57(24)
The Disappointments of English Spelling
57(1)
Letter-Name Spelling
58(5)
Initial Consonants
59(3)
Consonant Digraphs
62(1)
How We Make Speech Sounds: A Long but Necessary Digression
63(8)
A Return to Digraphs
65(2)
Nasal Consonants: The Letters Nand M
67(1)
Invented Spelling of Long Vowels
68(1)
Invented Spelling of Short Vowels
68(3)
How Vowels Are Produced
71(5)
Syllables without Vowels
73(1)
Choo Choo Chran
74(2)
The Developmental Dimension of Invented Spelling
76(3)
Segmenting Words into Phonemes
77(1)
The Concept of Word
78(1)
Letters to Represent Sounds
79(1)
Conclusion
79(1)
Endnotes
80(1)
Learning Standard Spelling
81(20)
How English Got Its Strange Spelling
83(1)
Some Learnable Patterns of Modern English Spelling
84(15)
Marking Rules in English Spelling
85(5)
Scribal Rules in English Spelling
90(3)
Phonological Rules in English Spelling
93(3)
Morpheme Conservation Rules in English Spelling
96(3)
Conclusion
99(1)
Endnotes
100(1)
Making Progress in Spelling
101(20)
The Stages of Spelling Development
102(5)
Prephonemic Spelling
102(1)
Early Phonemic Spelling
103(2)
Letter-Name Spelling
105(1)
Transitional Spelling
105(1)
Correct Spelling
106(1)
Helping Children Make Progress in Spelling
107(11)
For the Prephonemic Speller
107(2)
For the Early Phonemic Speller
109(4)
For the Letter-Name Speller
113(2)
For the Transitional Speller
115(3)
Conclusion
118(1)
Endnotes
118(3)
PART THREE The Beginnings of Composition 121(124)
Functions and Forms in Children's Composition
123(6)
Self, Audience, Topic, and Purpose: A Menu of Writing forms
125(3)
Conclusion
128(1)
Endnotes
128(1)
Writing in the Expressive Mode
129(8)
Transitional Writing: Expressive Traces in the Other Two Modes
132(2)
Conclusion
134(1)
Endnotes
135(2)
Writing in the Poetic Mode
137(42)
Stages
138(3)
Joey's Works: A First Grader Learns to Write Stories
141(17)
Sarah's Works: Literature Influences Story Development
158(4)
Developing the Poetic Mode in School
162(15)
Story Grammar
163(3)
Outer Actions and Inner States: Souriau's Dramatic Roles
166(7)
Poetry
173(4)
Conclusion
177(1)
Endnotes
178(1)
Writing in the Transactional Mode
179(24)
Assignments for Expository Writing
182(9)
The ``Expert'': An Expository Assignment
182(7)
Another Expository Assignment: How to Ride a Bicycle
189(2)
An Assignment for Argumentative Writing
191(6)
Encouraging Writing in a Variety of Modes
197(5)
Conclusion
202(1)
Writing: The Child, the Teacher, and the Class
203(42)
Writing as a Social Activity
203(1)
What Sort of Learning Is Learning to Write?
203(1)
A Description of the Writing Process
204(3)
The Stages of Writing
205(2)
Atmosphere, Assignment, and Response: The Teacher's Role in the Writing Process
207(1)
An Atmosphere for Writing
207(1)
Choosing Topics for Writing
207(1)
Appropriate Responses to Children's Writing
208(1)
The Kindergarten Year
208(4)
Setting Up a Literate Community
209(1)
Drawing Out Oral Language
209(1)
Connecting Writing and Speech
210(2)
The Primary Years
212(30)
An Overview of a Process-Writing Classroom
212(1)
What to Do on the First Day
213(3)
Beyond Day One: A Typical Day
216(2)
Setting Up the Classroom
218(6)
The Dynamics of Moving a Promising Draft Along
224(7)
Conferencing Techniques
231(8)
Publishing Possibilities
239(1)
Evaluation
240(2)
Conclusion
242(1)
Endnotes
242(3)
Epilogue: Classroom Environments for Reading and Writing Together 245(22)
An Emphasis on Processes
245(1)
Environments That Make Reading and Writing Contagious
246(1)
The Teacher Goes First: Establishing a Trusting Environment
247(13)
The Teacher as Writer
247(1)
The Teacher as Reader
248(2)
Children and Teachers Sharing Writing Strategies
250(3)
Teacher and Children as Readers and Writers
253(1)
Modeling Writing Dialogue
254(2)
Publishing Children's Work
256(1)
Modeling Proofreading Techniques
257(2)
Making Connections across the Curriculum: The Real Use of Reading and Writing
259(1)
Classroom Routines That Encourage Reading and Writing
260(2)
Conclusion
262(1)
Endnotes
262(1)
Bibliography
263(4)
Books That Make Reading/Writing Connections
263(1)
Books about Reading and Writing Poetry
263(1)
Writing across the Curriculum
264(1)
Books That Will Improve your Own Writing
264(1)
Other Basic Resources for Teachers
264(1)
Magazines We Routinely Read
265(1)
Basic Resources for Children
266(1)
Our Favorite Word Processing Programs
266(1)
Index 267


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