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Behavior Management : A Practical Approach for Educators,9780131105492
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Behavior Management : A Practical Approach for Educators

by ; ;
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780131105492

ISBN10:
0131105493
Media:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $65.33
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Summary

Combines a thorough grounding in research with realistic case studies and dozens of examples to demonstrate behavior management theory as it applies to both general and special education settings. Blending theory with "how to's," the authors explain the field of behavior management from four perspectives--behavioral, psychodynamic, biophysical, and environmental--in straightforward, jargon-free prose that instantly engages future teachers in time-honored, research-supported techniques and strategies for encouraging desired behavior and discouraging undesired behavior. The goal? A practical guide to creating a peaceful, task-focused educational environment in which children can truly learn--and enjoy that learning. Includes discussion of the most-recent federal legislation governing the education of learners with disabilities. Incorporates the latest developments in the field, especially the integrative perspective and behavior management/educational issues that affect the implementation of text-advocated strategies. Coverage of four models of human behavior --Psychodynamic, biophysical, environmental, and behavioral provides a rationale not only for the behavior itself, but also for the text-suggested techniques for managing it. Detailed discussion of the role of educators in biophysical interventions; plus the necessity to respond to changes wrought by pupils' medication. Material on the impact of ethical, cultural, and linguistic diversity on behavior management. For future educators of general or special education.

Table of Contents

An Introduction to Behavior Management
2(28)
Definition of Behavior Management
7(1)
Ethics of Behavior Management
8(7)
The Question of Ethics
8(2)
Ethical Perspective
10(3)
The Rights of Children
13(2)
Public Law and Persons with Disabilities
15(4)
IDEA 97
15(3)
Public Law 101-336
18(1)
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
19(1)
Individualized Programs
19(1)
Summary
20(8)
Models of Human Behavior and Teacher Effectiveness Guidelines
28(28)
Models of Human Behavior
31(10)
Ideas, Actions, and Outcomes
31(2)
Psychodynamic
33(2)
Biophysical
35(1)
Environmental
36(3)
Behavioral
39(2)
Integrative Framework
41(5)
Comprehensive Interventions and Keystone Behaviors
45(1)
Teacher Effectiveness Guidelines
46(6)
Model and Leader
47(1)
Personal Traits
48(1)
Knowledge and Skills
49(1)
Self-Discipline
50(1)
Time
50(1)
Objectives and Goals
51(1)
Empathy
51(1)
Expectations
51(1)
Freedom and Independence
52(1)
Summary
52(4)
Principles of Behavior Modification
56(24)
Principles of Reinforcement
60(4)
Principle 1: Reinforcement Is Dependent on the Exhibition of the Target Behavior
60(1)
Principle 2: The Target Behavior Is to Be Reinforced Immediately After It Is Exhibited
61(1)
Principle 3: During the Initial Stages of the Behavior Change Process, the Target Behavior Is Reinforced Each Time It Is Exhibited
61(1)
Principle 4: When the Target Behavior Reaches a Satisfactory Level, It Is Reinforced Intermittently
62(1)
Principle 5: If Tangible Reinforcers Are Applied, Social Reinforcers Are Always Applied with Them
63(1)
Consequences of Behavior
64(10)
Positive Reinforcement
65(1)
Extinction
66(2)
Negative Reinforcement
68(2)
Punishment
70(1)
Effects of Consequences
71(1)
Generalization
71(2)
Discrimination
73(1)
Schedules of Reinforcement
74(3)
Continuous Schedules
74(1)
Fixed and Variable Schedules
74(3)
Summary
77(3)
Steps in the Behavior Change Process
80(42)
Selecting a Target Behavior
83(7)
Collecting and Recording Baseline Data
90(13)
Observer Reliability
102(1)
Identifying Reinforcers
103(9)
Preference Scales
104(1)
Preference List
104(1)
Interview with Child
105(2)
Interview with Parent or Teacher
107(1)
Direct Observation
108(2)
Phasing Out Reinforcers
110(1)
Reinforcement Area
110(2)
Implementing the Intervention and Collecting and Recording Intervention Data
112(2)
Prompting
113(1)
Evaluating the Effects of Intervention
114(1)
Summary
115(7)
Methods of Increasing Behavior
122(42)
Positive Reinforcement
125(2)
Shaping
127(5)
Contingency Contracting
132(11)
Self-Management
143(1)
Token Economy
144(9)
Modeling
153(2)
Summary
155(9)
Methods of Decreasing Behavior
164(36)
Aversives in the Educational Setting
167(1)
Differential Reinforcement
168(3)
Extinction
171(2)
Reprimands
173(1)
Loss of Privileges
174(2)
Time-Out
176(11)
Characteristics of the Child
179(1)
Consistency of Application
180(1)
Child's Understanding of the Rules
181(1)
Characteristics of the Time-Out Area
182(2)
Duration of Time-Out
184(1)
Evaluation of Effectiveness
184(3)
Punishment
187(4)
Desensitization
191(4)
Summary
195(5)
Psychodynamic Behavior Management
200(40)
Counseling Techniques
203(8)
Life-Space Interview
203(4)
Reality Therapy
207(3)
Classroom Conference
210(1)
Expressive Media
211(15)
Free Play
212(1)
Puppetry
213(1)
Role Playing and Psychodrama
214(2)
Creative Movement, Dance, and Physical Activities
216(1)
Music
217(2)
The Written Word
219(1)
The Spoken Word
219(1)
Bibliotherapy
220(2)
Art Therapy
222(1)
Photography and Videotaping
222(2)
Pet-Facilitated Therapy
224(2)
Behavior Influence Techniques
226(4)
Planned Ignoring
226(1)
Signal Interference
227(1)
Proximity Control
227(1)
Interest Boosting
227(1)
Tension Reduction Through Humor
228(1)
Hurdle Helping
228(1)
Program Restructuring
228(1)
Support From Routine
228(1)
Direct Appeal
228(1)
Removal of Seductive Objects
229(1)
Antiseptic Bouncing
229(1)
Physical Restraint
229(1)
Social Skills Curriculum
230(3)
Summary
233(7)
Environmental and Biophysical Behavior Management
240(44)
Environmental Interventions
243(24)
Group Composition
243(3)
Discussion Groups
246(1)
Class Meetings
247(2)
Antecedents of Effective Management (Organizing for Instruction)
249(9)
Milieu Therapy
258(1)
Levels Systems
258(9)
Expulsion, Suspension, and In-School Suspension
267(3)
Biophysical Interventions
270(8)
Diet
271(1)
Medication
272(2)
Educator's Role in Biophysical Interventions
274(4)
Summary
278(6)
Parent Education and Home-School Collaboration
284(34)
Need for Collaboration
287(2)
Parents' Reactions, Problems, and Needs
289(2)
An Integrative Framework
291(1)
Parent Training Purposes
292(11)
Objectives
292(1)
Selecting and Assessing the Target Behavior
293(6)
Home Reinforcers
299(2)
Parent Education Program
301(2)
Lesson 1: Introduction to Behavior Modification
303(2)
Home-School Collaboration
305(9)
Passport
306(1)
Daily Report Cards
307(7)
Summary
314(4)
Issues and Concerns in Behavior Management
318(28)
Integrative Framework and Behavior Management
321(1)
Educational Issues That Impact on Behavior Management
322(7)
Inclusion
322(1)
Prereferral Interventions
323(1)
Positive Behavioral Support
324(1)
Homework
325(2)
Aggression and Resistance in School
327(2)
Ethnic, Cultural, and Linguistic Diversity
329(3)
Students at Risk for Behavior Problems
332(4)
Continua of Behavior Management Interventions
336(3)
Behavior Management as Prevention
339(1)
Summary
340(6)
Glossary 346(4)
Worksheets and Forms 350(12)
Name Index 362(4)
Subject Index 366

Excerpts

This eighth edition ofBehavior Management: A Practical Approach for Educatorshas been revised to improve its usability and readability. Revisions are based on developments in the field of behavior management reported in the literature since the original manuscript was written 27 years ago and on feedback from many professionals, students, and reviewers. During the past three decades, the proliferation of behavior management philosophies, techniques, and instructional methodologies has increased the complexity of the educator's responsibilities and functions. New information is being published almost daily on the various perspectives of human behavior, including the behavioral, psychodynamic, biophysical, and environmental points of view that are discussed in this text. Revisions in the text are, in large part, a result of direct and indirect feedback from many undergraduate and graduate students of education, from general and special education teachers participating in in-service programs, from professional colleagues, and from reviewers who have studied previous editions. The text is written to provide a practical guide to experienced teachers, teachers-in-preparation, parents, and paraprofessionals for applying behavior management techniques both in general and special educational settings and in the home. It is designed to help teachers working in self-contained classes and resource programs, teachers engaging in itinerant and consultative services, and preschool, elementary, and secondary school teachers having responsibility for a diverse population of students. The text may be used for preservice and in-service courses and as a self-study guide. It has also been found to be of significant help to parents and parent educators. Chapter 1 includes a definition of behavior management and a discussion of the ethical application of behavior management interventions, including the principles of normalization, fairness, and respect; the federal laws governing services for persons, especially children, with disabilities; and techniques for the individualization of instruction and related services. The chapter contains information on the most current revisions of federal laws governing the education of learners with disabilities. Chapter 2 is devoted to models for understanding human behavior--including the psychodynamic, biophysical, environmental, and behavioral--and teacher effectiveness guidelines. The chapter uses an integrative ecological framework to coordinate the extant perspectives into a manageable assessment-intervention model of human behavior. Chapter 3 focuses on the principles of behavior modification, the consequences of behavior, and schedules of reinforcement. Each of the five principles is discussed and exemplified. The consequences of behavior include positive reinforcement, extinction, negative reinforcement, and punishment. The chapter concludes with a discussion of fixed and variable ratio and interval schedules of reinforcement. Chapter 4 reviews the steps in the behavior change process. It discusses selecting behaviors to be changed, collecting and recording preintervention or baseline data, identifying reinforcers, implementing interventions, collecting and recording intervention data, and evaluating the effects of the behavior change process. The chapter includes several methods for selecting potentially effective reinforcers, including preference scales and lists, child parent and teacher interviews, and direct observation. A chapter supplement includes an extensive list of potential reinforcers for use in school. Chapter 5 presents, in detail, methods for increasing behavior. These include positive reinforcement, shaping, contingency contracting, token economy, and modeling. A supplement containing sample contract forms follows the chapter. Chapter 6 is an extensive discussion of methods for decreasing behavior, including


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