9780205386024

Best Practices in Educational Interpreting

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780205386024

  • ISBN10:

    0205386024

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 6/6/2003
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Supplemental Materials

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Summary

Designed for all who work with the heterogeneous population of students with hearing loss, Best Practices in Educational Interpreting, Second Edition, and offers state-of-the-art-and-science information for interpreters in primary through higher education settings. Issues and methods are presented from a practical orientation, with representative cases that illustrate the topics.Best Practices in Educational Interpreting, Second Edition,offers state-of-the-art-and-science information for interpreters in primary through higher education settings.This text is a comprehensive, developmentally organized overview of the process of interpreting in educational settings. Readers learn about the changing needs of the hearing impaired as they move from primary school through college.Designed for all who work with the heterogeneous population of students with hearing loss.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Acknowledgments xvii
1 Educational Interpreting: An Introduction 1(16)
Interpreting and Inclusion
1(5)
The Scope of Practice for Educational Interpreters
6(1)
Current Practices
7(1)
The Audience and Contents of this Book
8(2)
Time for a Change
10(3)
How to Read the Chapters for Maximum Learning
13(2)
References
15(2)
2 Best Practices in the Administration of Educational Interpreting Services 17(29)
Question 1: Who is responsible for administering educational interpreting services?
18(1)
Question 2: What is involved in the position description for an educational interpreter?
19(1)
Question 3: What is involved in the contract for an educational interpreter?
20(4)
Question 4: What is involved in the policy manual or guidelines for educational interpreting services?
24(2)
Question 5: How should the interpreter be evaluated?
26(10)
Question 6: What are the best practices for handling difficult administrative situations?
36(8)
The Case of the Nonattending Student
36(1)
The Case of the New Cochlear Implant
37(1)
The Case of the Moving Family
38(1)
The Case of the Disgruntled Parents
39(1)
The Case of Evaluting the Interpreter
40(1)
The Case of Equal Access to the Handouts
41(2)
The Case of Changing Technologies
43(1)
Summary
44(1)
References
44(2)
3 Best Practices in Educational Interpreting in the Primary Grades Setting 46(35)
Question 1: What is expected of the educational interpreter in the primary grades?
46(7)
Question 2: What is the interpreter's role in working with an educational team?
53(2)
Question 3: Are there problems with confidentiality when the interpreter is expected to share information about the student with others?
55(2)
Question 4: What should the interpreter do during free play and other activities that are designed to promote social interaction?
57(4)
Question 5: Should the educational interpreter be expected to teach sign language (or cued speech or fingerspelling) to other students and adults?
61(3)
Question 6: What is the interpreter's role during story reading?
64(1)
Question 7: What is the role of fingerspelling in a primary educational setting?
65(2)
Question 8: Should signs be invented in the preschool and primary setting?
67(1)
Question 9: Should interpreters use their perspective or their student's perspective when interpreting number lines, calendars, and other spatial propositions?
68(1)
Question 10: What are the best practices for handling difficult interpreting situations in preschool and primary settings?
69(8)
The Case of the Positioned Interpreter
69(2)
The Case of the Inattentive Child
71(1)
The Case of the Brer Rabbit Stories
72(1)
The Case of the Aggressive Student
73(1)
The Case of the Parent Conference
74(1)
The Case of the Phone Call
75(2)
Summary
77(1)
References
78(3)
4 Best Practices in Interpreting in the Elementary and Middle-School Setting 81(34)
Question 1: What is expected of the educational interpreter in elementary- and middle-school settings?
81(7)
Question 2: How should the interpreter deal with textbook language in the curriculum?
88(5)
Question 3: What is the interpreter's responsibility with other curriculum situations that are not textbook bound?
93(2)
Question 4: What about interpreting for field trips, assemblies, musicals, and other special learning experiences?
95(1)
Question 5: What is the interpreter's role in interpreting tests?
96(2)
Question 6: What is the role of the interpreter with students who present with a mixed communication profile?
98(3)
Question 7: What is the interpreter's role in teaching the deaf or hard-of-hearing student to become an effective consumer of interpreting services?
101(3)
Question 8: What are the best practices for handling difficult interpreting situations in elementary- and middle-school settings?
104(8)
The Case of the Difficult Teacher
105(1)
The Case of the "Redneck" Jokes
106(2)
The Case of Weekly Religious Education
108(1)
The Case of the Locker Room
109(1)
The Case of Cheating
110(1)
The Case of Mocking
111(1)
Summary
112(1)
References
113(2)
5 Best Practices in Interpreting in High School and Vocational Settings 115(45)
Question 1: What is expected of interpreters in secondary educational settings?
115(6)
Question 2: How does curriculum differentiation affect the interpreter?
121(8)
Question 3: What is different about interpreting in vocational and laboratory settings?
129(8)
Question 4: How does technology affect interpreting?
137(2)
Question 5: What about interpreting in transition programs for secondary students?
139(2)
Question 6: How does scheduling affect secondary-level interpreters?
141(2)
Question 7: What other curriculum issues present extraordinary challenges to educational interpreters in secondary settings?
143(4)
Question 8: What is the interpreter's role regarding consumerism in the educational program?
147(3)
Question 9: What are the best practices for these difficult situations?
150(6)
The Case of the Knife
150(1)
The Case of Driver Education
151(1)
The Case of the Student Teacher
152(1)
The Case of the Work Transition Assignment
153(1)
The Case of the Grandmother
154(1)
The Case of the Vocational Test
155(1)
Summary
156(1)
References
157(3)
6 Best Practices in Interpreting in Higher Education Settings 160(31)
Question 1: What can educational interpreters expect in higher education settings?
160(4)
Question 2: What can the interpreter expect regarding curriculum?
164(6)
Question 3: What happens when the interpreter cannot visualize the information, when there is a breakdown, or a miscue, or an error?
170(4)
Question 4: What about interpreting in graduate school?
174(6)
Interview with Steve Nover on His Use of Interpreters
175(1)
Interview with Bonnie Poitras Tucker on Her Use of Oral Interpreters
176(2)
Interview with Donna Panko about Interpreting in a Doctoral Program
178(2)
Question 5: What obligations do educational interpreters have for their own lifelong learning?
180(3)
Question 6: What are the best practices for these difficult cases?
183(6)
The Case of Group Work
183(1)
The Case of Interpreters Teaming with Interpreters
184(2)
The Case of the Sleeping Student
186(1)
The Case of the New Signing Student
187(1)
The Case of the Final Semester Presentations
188(1)
Summary
189(1)
References
189(2)
7 Educational Interpreting Research 191(25)
Question 1: Why is research on educational interpreting important?
191(2)
Question 2: What research has been done to date on educational interpreting?
193(12)
Category 1: The current status of and consequential need for educational interpreters
197(3)
Category 2: Evaluation of interpreters engaged in interpreting
200(1)
Category 3: Interpreting in postsecondary educational settings
201(3)
Category 4: Other research
204(1)
Question 3: What research questions remain to be asked?
205(11)
Summary
216(1)
References 216(5)
Appendix 221(38)
RID Standard Practice Paper
223(4)
Code of Ethics of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Inc.
227(2)
The RID Certification Maintenance Program
229(2)
Cued Speech Transliterator Assessments
231(6)
The TEC Unit Cued Speech Transliterator Code of Conduct
237(4)
Oral Transliterating Defined
241(2)
Evaluating Eduational Interpreters Using Classroom Performance
243(10)
NIOSH Evaluates Musculoskeletal Disorders
253(2)
If I Had It to Do Over Again
255(4)
Index 259

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