9780807848296

Black Marxism

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780807848296

  • ISBN10:

    0807848298

  • Edition: Revised
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2000-01-01
  • Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Pr

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Summary

In this influential work, first published in 1993, Cedric Robinson demonstrates that efforts to understand black people's history of resistance solely through the prism of Marxist theory are incomplete and inaccurate. Marxist analyses, he shows, tend to presuppose European models of history and experience that downplay the significance of black people and black communities as agents of change and resistance. Black radicalism must be linked to the traditions of Africa and the unique experiences of blacks on western continents, Robinson argues, and any analysis of African American history needs to acknowledge this.

Table of Contents

Foreword xi
Robin D. G. Kelley
Preface to the 2000 Edition xxvii
Preface xxxv
Acknowledgments xxxvii
Introduction 1(8)
Part 1 The Emergence and Limitations of European Radicalism
Racial Capitalism: The Nonobjective Character of Capitalist Development
9(20)
Europe's Formation
10(3)
The First Bourgeoisie
13(5)
The Modern World Bourgeoisie
18(3)
The Lower Orders
21(3)
The Effects of Western Civilization on Capitalism
24(5)
The English Working Class as the Mirror of Production
29(16)
Poverty and Industrial Capitalism
31(2)
The Reaction of English Labor
33(3)
The Colonization of Ireland
36(3)
English Working-Class Consciousness and the Irish Worker
39(2)
The Proletariat and the English Working Class
41(4)
Socialist Theory and Nationalism
45(26)
Socialist Thought: Negation of Feudalism or Capitalism?
46(3)
From Babeuf to Marx: A Curious Historiography
49(3)
Marx, Engels, and Nationalism
52(10)
Marxism and Nationalism
62(3)
Conclusion
65(6)
Part 2 The Roots of Black Radicalism
The Process and Consequences of Africa's Transmutation
71(30)
The Diminution of the Diaspora
72(2)
The Primary Colors of American Historical Thought
74(7)
The Destruction of the African Past
81(1)
Premodern Relations between Africa and Europe
82(1)
The Mediterranean: Egypt, Greece, and Rome
83(2)
The Dark Ages: Europe and Africa
85(2)
Islam, Africa, and Europe
87(2)
Europe and the Eastern Trade
89(2)
Islam and the Making of Portugal
91(6)
Islam and Eurocentrism
97(4)
The Atlantic Slave Trade and African Labor
101(20)
The Genoese Bourgeoisie and the Age of Discovery
103(3)
Genoese Capital, the Atlantic, and a Legend
106(3)
African Labor as Capital
109(2)
The Ledgers of a World System
111(5)
The Column Marked ``British Capitalism''
116(5)
The Historical Archaeology of the Black Radical Tradition
121(46)
History and the Mere Slave
123(2)
Reds, Whites, and Blacks
125(3)
Black for Red
128(2)
Black Resistance: The Sixteenth Century
130(2)
Palmares and Seventeenth-Century Marronage
132(8)
Black Resistance in North America
140(4)
The Haitian Revolution
144(5)
Black Brazil and Resistance
149(6)
Resistance in the British West Indies
155(9)
Africa: Revolt at the Source
164(3)
The Nature of the Black Radical Tradition
167(8)
Part 3 Black Radicalism and Marxist Theory
The Formation of an Intelligentsia
175(10)
Capitalism, Imperialism, and the Black Middle Classes
177(4)
Western Civilization and the Renegade Black Intelligentsia
181(4)
Historiography and the Black Radical Tradition
185(56)
Du Bois and the Myths of National History
185(10)
Du Bois and the Reconstruction of History and American Political Thought
195(4)
Slavery and Capitalism
199(1)
Labor, Capitalism, and Slavery
200(3)
Slavery and Democracy
203(2)
Reconstruction and the Black Elite
205(2)
Du Bois, Marx, and Marxism
207(1)
Bolshevism and American Communism
208(4)
Black Nationalism
212(6)
Blacks and Communism
218(10)
Du Bois and Radical Theory
228(13)
C. L. R. James and the Black Radical Tradition
241(46)
Black Labor and the Black Middle Classes in Trinidad
241(10)
The Black Victorian Becomes a Black Jacobin
251(6)
British Socialism
257(3)
Black Radicals in the Metropole
260(10)
The Theory of the Black Jacobin
270(8)
Coming to Terms with the Marxist Tradition
278(9)
Richard Wright and the Critique of Class Theory
287(20)
Marxist Theory and the Black Radical Intellectual
287(4)
The Novel as Politics
291(2)
Wright's Social Theory
293(6)
Blacks as the Negation of Capitalism
299(2)
The Outsider as a Critique of Christianity and Marxism
301(6)
An Ending
307(12)
Notes 319(90)
Bibliography 409(22)
Index 431

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