9780120798759

Bond's Biology Of Fishes

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780120798759

  • ISBN10:

    0120798751

  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1/4/2006
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning

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Summary

Master the study of fishes with BOND'S BIOLOGY OF FISHES! Providing an excellent background for the study of more advanced works on fishes, this fish biology text gives you a clear and concise introduction to the study of fishes and provides you with tools that you need to succeed.

Table of Contents

Preface xvi
PART ONE AN INTRODUCTION TO THE FISHES
1(67)
Ichthyologists and What They Do
3(16)
A History of Ichthyology
4(8)
Diversification of Ichthyological Research
12(1)
Methods in Fish Biology
13(6)
Taxonomic Convention---Naming Fishes and Rules of Nomenclature
14(1)
Common Names
15(1)
Higher Classification of Fish Groups
15(1)
Centers for the Study of Fishes
15(4)
Origins of Fishes
19(12)
Fishes---The First Vertebrates
20(1)
Origins of Vertebrates
20(5)
Major Groups of Living Fishes
25(6)
Jawless Fishes
27(1)
Cartilaginous Gnathostomes
27(1)
Bony Fishes
28(3)
The Architecture of Fishes
31(37)
Environmental Constraints on the Design of Fishes
32(1)
General Body Form and Fins
32(12)
The Head
33(2)
Body Form
35(1)
Topography of the Body
36(1)
Fins
37(7)
Skin and Scales
44(4)
Epidermis
44(4)
Dermis
48(1)
Scales
48(1)
Internal Support: The Skeletal System
48(16)
The Axial Skeleton
48(12)
Fins and Associated Appendicular Skeleton
60(4)
Skeletal Muscle
64(1)
General Relationships of Internal Organs
64(4)
Alimentary Canal and Associated Structures
64(1)
Urogenital Organs
65(1)
The Heart
65(3)
PART TWO THE DIVERSITY OF FISHES
68(212)
Evolution and Systematics
71(209)
Foundations of Evolutionary Theory
72(1)
Processes of Selection
72(8)
Speciation Phenomena in Fishes
74(5)
Ecological Character Displacement
79(1)
Macro- versus Microevolution
80(1)
Systematic Studies: Tracing Evolutionary Histories
80(5)
Application of Molecular and Computational Advances
81(4)
An Integrated Approach to Understanding Evolution
85(4)
Jawless Fishes
Early Vertebrate Experiments and Descendant Forms
89(1)
The First Fishes: Relationships of Modern and Extinct Forms
90(1)
The Hagfishes and Lampreys: A Monophyletic Group?
90(6)
Hagfishes and Conodonts
92(1)
Order Myxiniformes
92(2)
Order Petromyzontiformes (Hyperoartia)
94(2)
The ``Ostracoderm'' Fishes: Proto-Gnathostomes?
96(9)
The †Pteraspidomorphi
97(2)
The †Cephalaspidomorphi
99(6)
The Gnathostomes
Fishes with Jaws
105(1)
Origin of the Jaws
106(1)
Gnathostomes at the Silurian/Ordovician Transition
106(3)
Class †Placodermi
107(2)
Class Chondrichthyes (Elasmoranchiomorphi)
109(20)
Evolution of the Jaw Suspensorium in Gnathostome Fishes
109(2)
Subclass Euchondrocephali
111(3)
Subclass Elasmobranchii
114(15)
The Bony Fishes (Teleostomi)
Acanthodians and Sarcopterygians
129(1)
Introduction to the Teleostomi
130(1)
Class †Acanthodii
130(1)
Class Sarcopterygii: Lobe-Finned Fishes and the Tetrapods
131(7)
The †Onychodontiformes: Fishes of Uncertain Affinities
132(2)
Subclass Coelacanthimorpha
134(2)
Taxon Dipnomorpha
136(2)
Subclass †Rhizodontimorpha
138(1)
Subclass †Osteolepimorpha (†Rhipidistia)
138(1)
The Origins of Tetrapods
138(9)
Introduction to the Actinopterygian Fishes
Origins and Modern Diversity
147(1)
Adaptations of the Actinopterygians
148(1)
Origins of the Actinopterygii
148(1)
Class Actinopterygii
149(10)
Subclass Chondrostei
149(7)
Subclass Neopterygii
156(3)
Teleostean Fishes
Early Members of the Most Diverse Assemblage of Fishes
159(1)
What Are the Teleosts?
160(1)
Division Teleostei: Identifying Features
160(1)
Extinct Primitive Teleosts
160(1)
Order †Pholidophoriformes
160(1)
Order †Leptolepidiformes
161(1)
Order †Tselfatiformes
161(1)
Order †Ichthyodectiformes
161(1)
Diversity of Living Teleosts
161(16)
Subdivision Osteoglossomorpha: The ``Bonytongues''
162(4)
Subdivision Elopomorpha: Tarpons, Ladyfishes, Eels, and Relatives
166(6)
Subdivision Clupeomorpha: Herrings and Relatives
172(5)
The Ostariophysi
Masters of the Freshwater Domain
177(1)
Ostariophysi as a Sister Group of the Clupeomorpha?
178(1)
Superorder Ostariophysi
178(15)
Series Anotophysi
178(1)
Series Otophysi
179(14)
The Euteleostei
Argentiniform and Salmoniform Fishes
193(1)
Classification of the Euteleostei
194(11)
Order Argentiniformes
194(2)
Order Salmoniformes
196(9)
Faster and Deeper
Esociformes and Some Basal Neoteleosts (Stomiiformes, Aulopiformes, Myctophiformes, Lampridiformes, and Polymixiiformes)
205(1)
Straddling the Neoteleostean Fence
206(1)
Esociformes: Sister Group of the Neoteleosts
206(1)
Stop the Presses! Sister Group to the Salmonoids After All?
206(1)
Order Esociformes
206(1)
Neoteleostci
207(5)
Superorder Stenopterygii
207(3)
Superorder Cyclosquamata
210(2)
Superorder Scopelomorpha
212(1)
Acanthomorph Fishes
212(5)
Superorder Lampridomorpha
212(1)
Superorder Polymixiomorpha
213(4)
The Paracanthopterygii
Cods, Toadfishes, and Other Bottom-Dwelling Teleosts
217(1)
Paracanthopterygians at a Glance
218(1)
Superorder Paracanthopterygii
218(11)
Order Percopsiformes (Salmopercae)
218(1)
Order Gadiformes (Anacanthini)
219(3)
Order Amblyopsiformes (Anacanthini)
222(1)
Order Ophidiiformes (Anacanthini)
222(1)
Order Batrachoidiformes (Anacanthini, Pediculati)
223(1)
Order Lophiiformes (Anacanthini, Pediculati)
224(5)
Acanthopterygian Fishes
Stephanoberyciformes, Zeiformes, and Beryciformes--Possibly Percomorphs, Possibly Not
229(1)
Introducing the Acanthopterygians
230(1)
Percomorph Fishes
230(5)
Order Stephanoberyciformes
230(2)
Order Zeiformes (Zeomorphi)
232(1)
Order Beryciformes (Berycomorphi)
233(2)
More Acanthopterygians
The Synbranchiformes, Elassoma, Gasterosteiformes, Mugilomorpha, and Atherinomorpha
235(1)
The Smegmamorpha: Housecleaning among the Percomorphs, or Just a Spurious Notion?
236(3)
Order Synbranchiformes
236(2)
Order Gasterosteiformes
238(1)
Series Mugilomorpha
239(1)
Order Mugiliformes
239(1)
Series Atherinomorpha
240(11)
Order Atheriniformes
240(2)
Order Beloniformes (Synentognathi or Exocoetoidei)
242(2)
Order Cyprinodontiformes (Microcyprini)
244(7)
Perciform Fishes
Perches and a Whole Lot More
251(1)
The Perciformes: An Embarrassment of Riches
252(17)
Suborder Percoidei
252(2)
Suborder Labroidei
254(1)
Suborder Trachinoidei
255(2)
Suborder Pholidichthyoidei
257(1)
Suborder Blennioidei
257(1)
Suborder Zoarcoidei
257(1)
Suborder Notothenioidei
258(1)
Suborder Icosteoidei
258(1)
Suborder Gobiesocoidei
258(1)
Suborder Callionymoidei
259(1)
Suborder Gobioidei
259(2)
Suborder Kurtoidei
261(1)
Suborder Acanthuroidei
261(1)
Suborder Scombrolabracoidei
262(1)
Suborder Scombroidei
262(1)
Suborder Stromateoidei
263(1)
Suborder Anabantoidei
264(1)
Suborder Channoidei
264(5)
The Spiny and the Strange
Scorpaenoid, Pleuronectiform, and Tetraodontiform Fishes
269(1)
The Scorpaenoidei: Welcome to the Perciformes---Again
270(2)
Relationships of ``Scorpaeniform'' Fishes
270(1)
Suborder Scorpaenoidei
270(2)
The Most Highly Derived Teleosts?
272(8)
Order Pleuronectiformes (Heterosomata)
272(3)
Order Tetraodontiformes (Plectognathi)
275(5)
PART THREE FORM AND FUNCTION
280(62)
The Integument of Fishes
Skin, Scales, and Associated Structures
283(1)
Integumentary Composition and Embryonic Origins
284(3)
The Epidermis
284(1)
The Dermis
284(1)
Phylogeny of Scale Types
285(2)
Hydrodynamics of Fishes
287(4)
Color
291(9)
Occurrence of Color in Fishes
291(2)
Color Change
293(3)
Significance of Color
296(4)
Bioluminescence
300(5)
Occurrence of Bioluminescence
300(2)
Production of Light
302(1)
Control of Luminescence
303(1)
Significance of Bioluminescence
303(2)
Venomous Fishes
305(6)
Muscles, Locomotion, and Buoyancy
311(31)
Musculoskeletal System
312(6)
Musculature of the Trunk and Appendages
312(4)
Neural Control of the Musculoskeletal System
316(2)
Modes of Locomotion
318(14)
Swimming
318(8)
Fin-Swimming Modes
326(1)
Swimming Speed
327(2)
Nonswimming Locomotion
329(3)
The Swim Bladder and the Regulation of Buoyancy
332(10)
Buoyancy: Gas Bladder and Retes, Fats, and Oils
332(10)
PART FOUR ADAPTATION TO THE EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT
342(62)
The Sensory Arsenal of Fishes I
Vision
345(1)
Integrating Sensory Biology with the Ecology and Behavior of Fishes
346(1)
General Morphology of Fish Eyes
346(2)
Structure and Function of Fish Visual Systems
348(8)
Adaptation of the Eye to the Optical Properties of Water
348(1)
Visual Cells and Pigments
348(4)
Focus, Accommodation, and Regulation of Light
352(4)
Visual Adaptation in the Lives of Fishes
356(7)
Visual Adaptations of Deep-Ocean Fishes
357(1)
``Dual-Purpose'' Eyes in Fishes
357(2)
Sensitivity to Light in the Ultraviolet Range
359(1)
Sensitivity to Polarized Light
359(1)
Some Alternative Photoreceptors
359(4)
The Sensory Arsenal of Fishes II
Systems for the Detection and Production of Auditory, Mechanical, and Electrical Stimuli
363(1)
Structure of Auditory, Mechanosensory, and Electrosensory Systems
364(6)
Auditory Systems: The Inner Ear
364(2)
The Lateral Line System
366(4)
Other Sensory Receptors
370(1)
Function of Auditory, Mechanosensory, and Electrosensory Systems
370(6)
Membranous Labyrinth
370(3)
Equilibrium
373(1)
Mechanosensory Function
374(1)
Electrosensory System Function
374(2)
Production of Electricity
376(4)
Electrogenic Fishes
376(1)
Structure of Electric Organs
377(2)
Functions of Electric Organs
379(1)
Sound Production in Fishes
380(9)
Nature of Sounds
380(4)
Significance of Sound Production
384(5)
The Sensory Arsenal of Fishes III
Olfaction, Taste, and Other Chemical Senses
389(1)
Chemosensation in Fishes
390(1)
Olfaction
390(7)
Structure of Receptor Organs
390(4)
Function and Significance of Olfaction
394(3)
Taste
397(2)
Taste Receptors
397(1)
Function and Significance of Taste
397(2)
Other Chemosensory Receptors
399(1)
Coda: Relating Sensory Adaptations to the Environment
400(4)
PART FIVE HOMEOSTATIC MECHANISMS
404(110)
Use and Acquisition of Food
407(34)
Metabolism and Growth
408(3)
Energetic Concerns
408(1)
Metabolism
408(1)
Growth
409(2)
Age and Growth Studies
411(1)
Nutrition
411(3)
Dietary Requirements of Fishes
412(1)
Role of Hormones
413(1)
The Alimentary Canal: Anatomical Features
414(7)
The Oral Cavity and Pharynx
414(4)
Esophagus, Stomach, and Intestine
418(3)
Foraging Activity and Feeding in Fishes
421(5)
Feeding in the Ecological Context
421(1)
Detection and Selection of Food
421(2)
Dietary Diversity and Foraging Activity
423(3)
Functional Morphology of the Feeding Apparatus
426(4)
Agnathan Fishes
426(1)
Chondrichthyan Fishes
426(1)
Jaws and Branchial Apparatus in Bony Fishes
427(2)
Preparation of Food for Digestion
429(1)
Ecomorphology and Feeding in Fishes
430(1)
Digestion
430(11)
The Digestive Process
430(3)
Rates and Efficiency of Digestion
433(8)
Circulation and Gas Exchange
441(28)
Architecture of the Gills
442(4)
Agnathan Fishes
442(1)
Gnathostome Fishes
443(3)
Gills as Gas Exchange Surfaces
446(5)
The Branchial Sieve
446(3)
Branchial Irrigation
449(2)
Extrabranchial and Aerial Oxygen Uptake
451(2)
Cutaneous Respiration
451(1)
Alternatives to Gills: Air Breathing
451(2)
Circulation
453(8)
Vascular Components
454(5)
Secondary Circulation
459(1)
Muscle and Choroid Retes
459(2)
The Blood of Fishes
461(8)
Blood Compounds Dissolved in Plasma
461(1)
Blood Cells
461(8)
Osmotic and Solute Regulation
469(24)
Osmoregulation
470(11)
Water and Solutes---Maintaining the Right Balance
470(1)
Osmotic and Ionic Regulation in Freshwater Fishes
471(2)
Osmotic and Ion Regulation in Marine Fishes
473(5)
Diadromous and Other Euryhaline Fishes
478(1)
Eggs and Larvae
479(1)
Applications of Studies on Osmoregulation to Fish Culture
480(1)
Role of the Endocrine System in Osmotic Regulation
480(1)
The Urinary System
481(7)
The Kidney
481(4)
Role of the Kidneys in Excretion and Osmoregulation
485(3)
Evolutionary Considerations
488(5)
Gills, Kidneys, and the Origins of Tetrapods
488(5)
Nervous and Endocrine Systems
493(21)
The Central and Peripheral Nervous System
494(6)
The Brain
494(3)
Cranial Nerves
497(1)
Spinal Cord and Nerves
498(2)
The Endocrine System
500(8)
The Hypothalamus
500(1)
The Pineal Organ
501(1)
The Pituitary Gland
501(4)
Thyroid Gland
505(1)
Interrenal Tissue
505(1)
Chromaffin Tissue
506(1)
Ultimobranchial Gland
506(1)
Pancreas (Islets of Langerhans)
506(1)
Gastroenteric Mucosa
507(1)
Gonads
507(1)
Corpuscles of Stannius
507(1)
Other Organs with Endocrine Function
508(1)
Neurosecretory Cells
508(1)
Caudal Neurosecretory System
508(1)
Pseudobranchial Neurosecretory Gland
508(1)
Paraneurons
509(1)
Natriuretic Peptides
509(1)
Evolutionary and Environmental Considerations
509(5)
PART SIX GENERATIONS OF FISHES
514(84)
Reproduction and Development
517(34)
Anatomy of the Reproductive System
518(2)
Hagfishes
518(1)
Lampreys
518(1)
Sharks
518(1)
Chimaeras (Ratfishes)
519(1)
Bony Fishes
519(1)
Function and Reproductive Patterns
520(14)
Reproductive Strategy
521(1)
Role of the Endocrine System
522(1)
Semelparity and Iteroparity
522(2)
Finding Mates
524(1)
Egg Production in Oviparous Fishes
524(2)
Egg Retention, Internal Incubation, and Viviparity
526(4)
Reproductive Guilds
530(1)
Differences Between the Sexes
530(3)
Hybridization
533(1)
Selective Breeding
533(1)
Embryonic and Early Development in Fishes
534(17)
Embryology
534(2)
Early Life History
536(15)
The Genetics of Fishes
551(47)
Introduction
552(1)
Fundamental Concepts
552(15)
Gene Expression
552(3)
Mitosis and Meiosis
555(1)
Mendelian Inheritance
555(10)
Gene Mapping
565(1)
Non-Mendelian Inheritance
565(2)
Chromosomes
567(5)
Chromosome and Arm Number in a Species
567(3)
Induced Polyploidy
570(1)
Hybrids
570(2)
Sex Determination
572(2)
Chromosomal Determination
572(1)
Environmental Determination
573(1)
Hermaphroditism
573(1)
All-Female Species
574(1)
Quantitative Genetics
574(3)
Polygenic Traits
574(1)
Heritability
575(2)
Genetics and Phylogenetics
577(7)
The ``Big'' Questions
579(4)
Other Phylogenetic Applications
583(1)
Detection and Study of Species
583(1)
Evolution, Conservation, and Management
584(5)
Population Genetics
584(1)
Biogeography
585(1)
Local Adaptation and Outbreeding Depression
586(1)
Genetics and Fisheries Management
587(2)
Conservation Genetics
589(1)
Recent Directions
589(9)
Fish as Model Systems
589(1)
Genetic Engineering
590(8)
PART SEVEN INTERACTIONS OF FISHES WITH THEIR ENVIRONMENT
598(200)
The Distribution of Fishes
601(197)
Introduction
602(3)
Historical Geology and Fish Distribution
605(4)
Stream Capture
605(1)
Continental Drift
606(2)
Glaciation
608(1)
Distribution of Freshwater or Inland Fishes
609(15)
Biogeographical Realms
609(15)
Distribution of Marine Fishes
624(15)
Pelagic Fishes
625(3)
Shore and Shelf Fishes
628(5)
Deep-Sea Fishes
633(6)
Ecology of Fishes I
An Introduction to Some Basic Ecological Concepts
639(1)
Understanding Ecology
640(1)
Methods of Ecological Study
640(2)
The Abiotic Environment
641(1)
The Biotic Environment
641(1)
The Abiotic Environment of Fishes
642(4)
Temperature
643(1)
Density and Viscosity of Water
644(1)
Hydrostatic Pressure
644(1)
Dissolved Substances
644(2)
Transparency of Water
646(1)
The Biotic Environment of Fishes
646(9)
Energy: The Driving Force of Ecological Interactions
646(2)
Levels of Ecological Organization
648(3)
Trophic Relationships in Fish Communities: Eating and Being Eaten
651(4)
Structure and Continuity in Ecological Systems
655(2)
Structuring the Fish Community
655(1)
Spatial Integrity and Continuity
655(1)
Temporal Continuity
656(1)
Looking at the Big Picture: Landscape Ecology, Metapopulations, and Macroecology
657(6)
Landscapes and Associated Metapopulations
657(1)
Macroecology: The Unification of Ecology and Biogeography
657(6)
Ecology of Fishes II
Freshwater Fishes in Flowing Waters
663(1)
Water---Abundant and Essential
664(1)
Stream Environments in Temperate Zones
665(7)
Upland Stream Environments
665(5)
Temperate Lowland Rivers and Streams: Habitat and Fish Assemblages
670(2)
Tropical Rivers and Streams
672(2)
Tropical Fish Assemblages
673(1)
Energetics and Trophic Structure of Riverine Food Webs
674(3)
Trophic Adaptations in Stream Fishes
674(1)
Riverine Trophic Structure and the Role of Fishes
675(2)
The Landscape Connection
677(4)
Ecology of Fishes III
Freshwater Fishes in Still Waters
681(1)
Environmental Features of Lentic Systems
682(4)
Origins of Lakes
682(1)
Lake Environments as Habitat for Fishes
682(2)
Temperate Lentic Environments
684(1)
Tropical Lentic Environments
685(1)
Fish Assemblages of Lentic Waters
686(2)
Temperate Lakes
686(2)
Tropical Lakes
688(1)
Trophic Adaptations
688(3)
Ecomorphology and Dietary Versatility
688(1)
Species Flocks
689(1)
Optimal Foraging Theory
689(2)
Hypogean Systems: An Unusual Aquatic Habitat
691(4)
Inland Saline Waters and Associated Fish Assemblages
695(6)
Ecology of Fishes IV
Coastal Marine Environments: The Continental Shelf
701(1)
Introduction to the Marine Realm
702(1)
Coastal Marine Environments
702(11)
The Continental Shelf
702(1)
Pelagic Fish Fauna
703(1)
Benthic Fish Fauna
704(1)
Coral Reefs
705(8)
Ecology of Fishes V
Coastal Marine Environments: Beaches, Estuaries, and Rocky Intertidal Shores
713(1)
The Nearshore Environment
714(2)
Protected Inshore Environments: Bays and Estuaries
716(6)
Temperate Estuarine Ecosystems and Associated Fish Assemblages
716(1)
Tropical Estuarine Ecosystems and Associated Fish Assemblages
717(5)
Exposed Inshore Environments: Surf Zones of Sandy Beaches and Rocky Shores
722(4)
Fish Assemblages of Surf Zones
722(1)
The Fish Fauna of Rocky Shores
722(4)
Seasonal Variation in Coastal Fish Assemblages
726(5)
Inshore Environments as Nurseries
726(5)
Ecology of Fishes VI
The Pelagic and Benthic Realm Beyond the Continental Shelf; Polar Environments
731(1)
Large Marine Ecosystems
732(1)
The Open-Water Pelagic Realm
732(5)
The Epipelagic Zone
733(3)
The Mesopelagic Zone
736(1)
The Bathypelagic Realm and Beyond
737(6)
The Continental Slope and Abyssal Plain
740(1)
Adaptations of Deep Benthic and Benthopelagic Fishes
741(1)
Deep Benthic Fish Assemblages
742(1)
Marine Fishes of Polar Environments
743(12)
The Nature of Polar Environments
743(1)
The Polar Fish Fauna
744(11)
Behavior I
Getting Along in the Physical World
755(1)
Behavior: The Ichthyological Perspective
756(1)
Locomotor Responses to Stimuli
756(5)
Phototaxis
757(1)
Geotaxis
758(1)
Electrotaxis and Magnetotaxis
758(1)
Thigmotaxis
759(1)
Rheotaxis
759(1)
Chemotaxis
760(1)
Homing and Migration
761(12)
Homing Behavior
761(1)
Migration
762(11)
Behavior II
Feeding, Fooling Around, and Finding Your Friends: The Social World of Fishes
773(1)
Feeding Behavior of Individuals
774(2)
Detection of Food
774(1)
Foraging Behavior
775(1)
Application of Feeding Adaptations
775(1)
Ecological Implications of Foraging Behavior
776(1)
Fish with Other Fish: Social Interactions
776(2)
Games Fishes Play
776(1)
Communication: Signals and Social Behavior
777(1)
Reproductive and Parental Behavior
778(5)
Courtship and Breeding Behavior
779(2)
Sexual Selection and Sexual Dynamics
781(1)
Parental Care
782(1)
Shoals and Schools
783(4)
Formation of Schools
783(1)
Sensory Facilitation of Schooling
784(1)
Adaptive Advantage of Schooling
784(2)
Mixed-Species Shoals and Schools
786(1)
Symbiosis
787(4)
Symbiotic Relationships Among Fishes
787(1)
Symbiotic Relationships with Invertebrates
787(4)
Learning in Fishes
791(7)
Adaptive Behavioral Modification and Its Applications
791(7)
PART EIGHT FISHES AND HUMANITY
798(55)
Parasites and Diseases of Fishes
801(52)
Parasites as Extremely Symbiotic Creatures
802(1)
Evolution of Parasitic Forms and Life Histories
802(2)
Evolutionary Considerations and Ecological Consequences
803(1)
Parasite Communities
804(1)
Survey of Parasitic Organisms and the Diseases They Cause
804(6)
Viruses
804(1)
Eubacteria (Monera)
805(1)
Protista
805(2)
Fungi
807(1)
Animalia
807(3)
Impact of Parasites on Evolution and Adaptation of Host Species
810(4)
Dynamics of Host--Parasite Associations
810(3)
Behavior and Susceptibility to Parasites
813(1)
Parasites as Biological ``Tags'' of Fish Populations
813(1)
Nonparasitic Fish Diseases
814(1)
Environmentally Induced Diseases
814(1)
Dietary Diseases
814(1)
Genetic Disorders
814(1)
Fishes as Carriers of Human Parasites and Diseases
815(1)
Toxic Fishes
816(7)
Ciguatera
816(1)
Scombroid Poisoning
817(1)
Tetrodotoxin Poisoning
817(1)
Other Fish Poisons
818(5)
Fishes and Fishery Resources
Their Use and Conservation
823(1)
The Value of Fishes
824(1)
Fishery Resources
824(1)
A Chronology of Fishery Interests
824(1)
Some Fishery Statistics
825(1)
Freshwater and Anadromous Fisheries
825(7)
The Great Lakes: Decline of a Temperate Lake Fishery
829(1)
Anadromous Fisheries
830(1)
Tropical Freshwater Fisheries
831(1)
Marine Fisheries
832(2)
Pelagic Fisheries
832(1)
Demersal Fisheries
833(1)
The Science and Technology of Fisheries
834(1)
Scientific Management of Fisheries
835(2)
Recreational Fisheries
837(1)
The Ornamental Fish Trade
837(1)
Aquaculture
838(2)
Conservation of Habitat and Biodiversity
840(4)
Chemical Pollutants
840(1)
Extinctions and the Impact of Exotic Species
841(2)
Hydrological Modifications
843(1)
Global Environmental Perturbations
843(1)
Are There Fish in Our Future?
844(9)
Preserving Fish and Fisheries
844(1)
Redefining Stewardship
845(8)
Greek and Latin Word Roots and Terms 853(2)
Glossary 855(6)
Subject Index 861(10)
Systematic Index 871

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