9780124499683

Breakthrough Technology Project Management

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780124499683

  • ISBN10:

    0124499686

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Nonspecific Binding
  • Copyright: 8/15/2011
  • Publisher: Routledge
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Supplemental Materials

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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Although there are many books of methods and tools in different areas, few books actually give detailed tips and lessons on how to effectively set up and manage projects. Most books on project management devote all their space to specific methods. Breakthrough Technology Project Management, Second Edition provides tangible guidelines through examples and suggestions to help people participate in and manage projects more effectively. The authors' techniques and guidelines have been proven over the past 15 years in courses and counseling. This book is a valuable tool for those working in information systems, engineering, computer science, operations and production, and other environments involving project management. Key Features * The Purpose of this book is to answer: * How can the overall technology project management process be improved? * Which systems projects should be given resources and approved for action? * How can all systems and technology projects be better managed together? * How can individual projects be better managed and more successful? * What are specific guidelines for managing different types of projects? The Scope of the Book Answers * What projects should be approved? * How do you formulate and start projects effectively? * How do you manage single and multiple projects? * How do you identify, analyze, and address specific project issues? * How do you obtain results through communicating effectively with management, team members, staff, and vendors?

Table of Contents

Preface xvii
About the Authors xxv
Part I Improving the Project Management Process
Introduction
Project Management Concepts
3(2)
Definitions
3(2)
Differences between Standard and IT Projects
5(1)
Trends in Business
6(1)
Trends in Technology
7(1)
Trends in Systems
7(1)
Trends in Project Management
8(1)
Common Systems Project Management Myths
9(2)
Why IT Projects Fail
11(4)
Traditional Project Process
11(1)
Twenty-Six Reasons That Systems Projects Fail
12(3)
Guidelines for Success
15(2)
Modern Project Management Process
15(1)
Why Projects Succeed
16(1)
Organization of the Book
17(1)
E-Business Lessons Learned
17(1)
What to Do Next
18(1)
Summary
19(2)
Developing Your Project Management Process and Strategy
Introduction
21(1)
Approach
22(11)
Establish Basic Components of the Project Management Process
23(3)
Define Critical Business Processes and Activities as Well as the System Architecture and Process Plans
26(1)
Review All Current Projects and Associate Them with the Process Plans and Architecture
26(1)
Develop Project Concepts for New Project Ideas and Current Projects
27(1)
Analyze and Relate All Project Concepts
28(1)
Determine Which Projects Will Be Approved for Implementation
28(1)
Develop Detailed Project Plans for Approved Projects and Begin Work
29(1)
Manage, Monitor, and Report on the Project Slate
29(1)
Develop and Implement Criteria for Project Ending and Termination
30(1)
Transition to the New Project Management Process
30(1)
Marketing the New Project Management Process
31(2)
Example: Beaumont Insurance
33(2)
E-Business Lessons Learned
35(1)
Guidelines
36(1)
What to Do Next
37(1)
Summary
37(2)
Managing Multiple Projects and the Project Slate
Introduction
39(2)
Approach
41(11)
Categories of Interdependence
41(2)
Assessment of Current Projects
43(4)
Planning across Multiple Projects
47(1)
Setting Priorities and the Project Slate
47(5)
Example: Astro Bank
52(2)
E-Business Lessons Learned
54(1)
Guidelines
54(1)
What to Do Next
55(1)
Summary
55(4)
Part II Developing Your Project Plans
The Project Concept
Introduction
59(1)
Approach
60(12)
What Is in the Project Concept?
60(1)
Conceiving of a Project
61(3)
Define Alternatives for the Project Objectives
64(1)
Determine Alternatives for the Scope of the Project
65(3)
Prepare Alternative Schedules, Costs, and Benefits
68(1)
Define the Role for the Alternatives
69(1)
Analyze the Results of Steps 1-4 and Determine the Recommended Project Concept
70(1)
Identify Initial Issues
70(1)
Obtain Management Feedback and Commitment
71(1)
Example: Astro Bank
72(2)
E-Business Lessons Learned
74(1)
Guidelines
74(1)
What to Do Next
75(1)
Summary
75(2)
The Right Project Leader
Introduction
77(1)
Approach
78(14)
What Should You Look for in a Project Leader?
78(2)
How Do You Find and Select Project Managers?
80(1)
What Are the Duties of a Modern Project Leader?
81(4)
How Do the Duties Shift during the Life of the Project?
85(1)
What Does a Project Leader Need to Know?
85(1)
How Do You Become a Project Leader?
86(1)
What Is the Role of a Superproject Leader?
86(1)
How Do the Responsibilities of a Manager of a Small Systems Project Differ from That of a Large Project?
87(1)
What Is the Role of the Project Coordinator?
88(1)
What Are the Role and Suitability of the Project Office?
88(1)
Can a Project Leader Manage Multiple Projects?
89(1)
Sources of Failure for a Project Leader
90(1)
Success for a Project Leader
91(1)
How Do You Measure a Project Leader?
92(1)
Examples of Project Leaders
92(1)
Project Leaders in Manufacturing
92(1)
General Systems Project Leader
93(1)
E-Business Lessons Learned
93(1)
Guidelines
94(1)
What to Do Next
94(1)
Summary
95(2)
Building the Project Team
Introduction
97(2)
Approach
99(11)
What Are the Responsibilities of Team Members?
99(1)
What Skills Do You Require for the Team---by Phase?
99(1)
When Should You Form the Team?
100(1)
How Do You Get Team Members?
101(1)
Should You Use Consultants?
101(2)
How Should You Hire and Direct Consultants?
103(1)
Team Dynamics
104(1)
Sharing Team Members between Projects
105(1)
Common Team Problems
106(2)
Managing Teams
108(1)
How Do You Keep Team Members?
109(1)
How Do You Discharge and Replace Team Members?
109(1)
Example: Astro Bank
110(1)
E-Business Lessons Learned
111(1)
Guidelines
111(2)
What to Do Next
113(1)
Summary
113(2)
Developing the Project Plan
Introduction
115(1)
Approach
116(15)
What Information Must Be Managed?
116(1)
What Methods and Tools Will Be Employed for Project Management?
116(3)
What Methods and Tools Will Be Used Directly in the Project?
119(1)
How Do Templates, Issues, Lessons Learned, and the Plan Link?
120(1)
How Should You Develop Project Templates?
121(1)
How Do You Establish an Effective and Flexible Task List?
121(2)
How Should You Assign Resources?
123(1)
How Do You Relate Areas of Risk to the Plan?
123(1)
How Should You Establish Dates and Durations?
124(1)
How Should You Link Projects?
124(1)
How Do You Create the Project Budget?
125(3)
How Do You Determine Benefits?
128(1)
How Should You Establish Multiple Projects?
128(1)
How Do You Establish a Baseline Plan?
128(1)
How Do You Sell the Plan?
129(1)
How Do You Fix an Existing Schedule?
130(1)
Example: Electronic Commerce
131(1)
E-Business Lessons Learned
131(1)
Guidelines
132(1)
What to Do Next
132(1)
Summary
133(4)
Part III Managing Projects
Effective Project Tracking and Coordination
Introduction
137(1)
Approach
138(15)
How Do You Identify and Manage Issues?
138(1)
How Do You Measure Open Issues?
139(1)
What General Issues Analysis Do You Perform?
140(1)
How Do You Measure the Work in a Systems and Technology Project?
141(2)
How Do You Analyze a Project?
143(3)
How Do You Perform Budget versus Actual Analysis?
146(1)
How Do You Track Multiple Projects?
146(1)
How Should You Communicate Effectively with Management?
147(5)
How Do You Cope with a Project Crisis?
152(1)
How Can You Effectively Employ Lessons Learned?
152(1)
Example: Beaumont Insurance
153(1)
E-Business Lessons Learned
153(1)
Guidelines
154(1)
What to Do Next
155(1)
Summary
155(2)
Software Development
Introduction
157(2)
Modern versus Traditional Development
157(1)
Methods and Tools
158(1)
Approach
159(12)
Requirements for a Development Approach
159(1)
Steps in a Development Approach
160(1)
Understand the Current Business Process and Systems
161(2)
Define the New or Modified Business Process
163(2)
Determine the Benefits, User Requirements, and System Requirements
165(3)
Design the New Transactions, System, and Interfaces
168(1)
Develop, Integrate, and Test the System
169(1)
Prepare Operations Manuals, Training Materials, and Operations Procedures
170(1)
Convert and Set Up the System and Process for Operation
170(1)
Convert to the New Process and System
171(1)
Example: Arcadia Health Services
171(2)
E-Business Lessons Learned
173(1)
Guidelines
173(1)
What to Do Next
174(1)
Summary
174(1)
Operations, Maintenance, and Enhancement
Introduction
175(2)
Approach
177(13)
A Proactive Management Approach
177(2)
Measure Information Systems Allocations
179(2)
Develop Process Plans for Key Processes
181(2)
Create a Strategic Systems Plan
183(1)
Construct Departmental Systems Plans
184(1)
Set the Slate of Work
184(4)
Follow Through on the Work
188(2)
Example: Rapid Energy Company
190(1)
E-Business Lessons Learned
190(1)
Guidelines
191(1)
What to Do Next
191(1)
Summary
192(1)
Software Packages
Introduction
193(2)
Approach
195(15)
Steps in Implementation
195(1)
Assess Your Current Systems, Processes, and Technology
196(2)
Evaluate Software Packages and Support Requirements
198(5)
Select the Package and Negotiate the Contract
203(1)
Install the Software and Conduct a Pilot Project
204(5)
Undertake Full-Scale Implementation
209(1)
Examples
210(2)
South County---A Near Disaster
210(1)
Vixen Manufacturing
211(1)
E-Business Lessons Learned
212(1)
Guidelines
212(1)
What to Do Next
213(1)
Summary
213(2)
Technology Projects
Introduction
215(1)
Approach
216(14)
Your Information Systems and Technology Architecture
216(2)
Risks in Technology Projects
218(1)
Costs and Benefits of Technology Projects
219(1)
Steps in a Technology Project
220(1)
Determine Technology Opportunities
221(1)
Define the Long-Term Architecture
222(1)
Develop a Technology Project Strategy
223(2)
Evaluate and Select Products
225(1)
Develop the Project Plan
226(1)
Implement the Technology
227(1)
Measure the Project Results
227(1)
Things That Go Wrong and What to Do about Them
228(2)
Examples
230(1)
Electronic Commerce
230(1)
Groupware
230(1)
Intranet/Internet
231(1)
E-Business Lessons Learned
231(1)
Guidelines
232(1)
What to Do Next
232(1)
Summary
233(4)
Part IV How to Successfully Address Project Issues
Business Issues
Introduction
237(1)
Issues
237(14)
The Business Unit Changes Requirements Frequently
237(2)
The Business Unit Does Not Provide Good People for the Project
239(1)
The Business Unit Is Unwilling to Change the Business Process
240(1)
Several Business Units Cannot Agree among Themselves
241(1)
The Business Unit Cannot Consistently Resolve Issues
242(1)
The Business Unit Staff Members Do Not Know the Business Process
242(1)
The Existing Business Process Is in Poor Condition
243(1)
Middle Level Business Unit Management Resists Change and the System
244(1)
The Business Unit Attempts to Dominate the Project
245(1)
The Business Unit View Does Not Fit with That of Upper Management or the Industry
246(1)
Business Unit Managers and Staff Lack Technical Knowledge
247(1)
Business Unit Management Is Replaced
248(1)
The Business Unit Has No Interest in the Project
248(1)
Other Work or Projects Have Higher Priority for the Business Unit Than Your Project Does
249(1)
The Business Unit Has Existing Technology That Conflicts with That of the Project
250(1)
What to Do Next
251(1)
Summary
251(2)
Human Resource Issues
Introduction
253(1)
Issues
253(18)
Turnover of Project Team Members
253(3)
Lack of Commitment
256(1)
Lack of Knowledge
257(1)
Team Members Are Inflexible
258(2)
Team Members Resist Project Management
260(1)
Conflicts within the Team
260(1)
Team Members Spend Too Much Time on the Wrong Tasks
261(1)
Team Members Are Overcommitted to Projects
262(1)
There Is a Personnel Gap---Missing Skills
263(1)
A Team Member Is Reluctant to Leave the Project
264(1)
Team Members Spend Too Much Time in Communications
264(1)
A Team Member Resists Learning New Skills
265(2)
A Team Member Leaves, Producing a Gap
267(1)
The Quality of a Team Member's Work Is Inadequate
268(1)
There Is Conflict between Junior and Senior Staff
269(1)
The New Team Member Does Not Fit
270(1)
What to Do Next
271(2)
Management Issues
Introduction
273(1)
Issues
273(9)
Management Changes Direction of the Project
273(1)
Management Loses Interest
274(1)
Key Manager Who Supported the Project Leaves
275(1)
Management Expands Scope
276(1)
There Is No Will to Allocate Resources
276(1)
Management Rules by Consensus
277(1)
Management Locks onto Hot Topics
278(1)
Management Adopts a Specific Package and Jams It Down Everyone's Throat
278(1)
Management Listens Too Much to Consultants
279(1)
Management Wants to Change E-Business Priorities
280(1)
Marketing Defines New E-Business Initiatives with Management Support
281(1)
What to Do Next
282(1)
Summary
282(1)
Technical Issues
Introduction
283(1)
Issues
283(14)
Legacy System Support Is Too Resource Intensive
283(1)
There Is a Lack of Available Training for Staff
284(1)
The Technology Requires a Learning Curve That Is Too Long
285(1)
There Is a Lack of Experience and Knowledge of the Technology
286(1)
The Technology Does Not Work
287(1)
Ordering and Delivery of the Technology Are Delayed
288(1)
A New Version of the Technology Will Be Available Soon
289(1)
There Is a Lack of Support for Interfaces to Existing Technology
290(1)
There Is a Gap in the Technology
290(1)
The Pilot Results from the Technology Were Not Successful
291(1)
The Performance of the Technology Is Not Satisfactory
292(1)
Features Are Missing
293(1)
The Technology in Use Is Obsolete
294(1)
The Technology Is Not Scalable to Handle the Workload
295(1)
The Wrong Direction in Technology Was Taken
296(1)
What to Do Next
297(1)
Summary
297(2)
Vendor and Consultant Issues
Introduction
299(1)
Issues
299(16)
There Is a Lack of Support from the Vendor
299(2)
The Vendor Attempts to Take Over the Project
301(1)
The Vendor Delivers Something Different from What Was Promised
302(1)
The Vendor Provides the Wrong Staff
303(1)
The Vendor Takes a Different Business Direction, Leaving You Adrift
304(1)
The Vendor's Staff Members Are Absent from the Project Too Much
305(1)
The Vendor's Work Is of Poor Quality
306(1)
The Vendor's Skills Are Insufficient, Producing a Gap
306(1)
The Vendor's Staff Members Seem to Remain on the Project Forever
307(1)
There Is No Committed Schedule from the Vendor
308(1)
There Is Substantial Turnover of Vendor Staff Assigned to the Project
309(1)
There Are Delays in Vendor Responses to Problems, Affecting the Project
310(1)
The Vendor's Staff Members Are Locked into Their Own Methods, Which Are Incompatible with the Project
311(1)
The Project Is Overdependent on the Vendor
312(1)
Vendors Don't Cooperate among Themselves
312(1)
Vendor Subcontracts Out the Work and Then Disappears
313(1)
Vendor Uses What It Did on Your Project with Its Next Client
314(1)
Vendor Turns Over Work Products That Are Not Usable
315(1)
What to Do Next
315(1)
Summary
316(1)
How to Implement Improved Project Management
Introduction
317(1)
Approach
317(7)
Quick Hit Implementation Steps
317(3)
Intermediate-Term Actions
320(1)
Long-Term Steps
321(2)
Points of Potential Resistance and What to Do
323(1)
Summary
324(1)
Bibliography 325(2)
Web Sites 327(2)
Appendix 1: The Magic Cross Reference 329(4)
Appendix 2: Issues Checklist 333(4)
Index 337

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