CART

(0) items

Business Data Networks and Telecommunications,9780132214414
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Business Data Networks and Telecommunications

by
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780132214414

ISBN10:
0132214415
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $170.67
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.01
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Business Data Communications and Networking
    Business Data Communications and Networking
  • Business Data Communications and Networking : A Modular Approach
    Business Data Communications and Networking : A Modular Approach
  • Business Data Networks and Security
    Business Data Networks and Security
  • Business Data Networks and Security
    Business Data Networks and Security
  • Business Data Networks and Telecommunications
    Business Data Networks and Telecommunications
  • Business Data Networks and Telecommunications
    Business Data Networks and Telecommunications
  • Business Data Networks and Telecommunications
    Business Data Networks and Telecommunications
  • Business Data Networks and Telecommunications
    Business Data Networks and Telecommunications




Summary

This book has11 core chaptersthat form a complete introduction to networking.Mini chapters follow 4 of the chapters(ch. 1, 3, and 8, and 9) with case studies or hands-on exercisesreinforcing material in the previous core chapter. In addition, three advanced modules at the end of the book (Module A, B, and C) contain material teachers may wish to cover selectively for emphasis

Author Biography

Ray Panko is a professor of IT management at the University of Hawaii's College of Business Administration.

Table of Contents

Preface for Teachers xxiii
Preface for Students xxxi
An Introduction To Networking
1(76)
What Is Networking?
1(4)
The Internet
2(2)
Internal Corporate Network Applications
4(1)
Data Communications and Telecommunications
4(1)
Single Networks
5(7)
The Nine Elements of a Network
5(1)
Client Computers, Server Computers, and Applications
6(1)
Frames and Packet Switching
6(1)
Switches and Routers
7(1)
Access Lines, Trunk Lines, and Multiplexing
8(1)
Wireless Access Points
9(1)
How to Talk About Network Costs
9(3)
LANS and WANS
12(6)
The First Bank of Paradise
12(1)
The Bank's Major Buildings
12(2)
Wide Area Networks (WANs)
14(1)
Local Area Networks (LANs)
15(2)
LAN and WAN Transmission Costs and Speeds
17(1)
WAN Carriers
17(1)
Internets
18(15)
Elements of an Internet
21(2)
Packets Versus Frames
23(1)
The Internet
24(4)
Subnets
28(2)
Intranets and Extranets
30(1)
IP Address Management
30(3)
Security
33(3)
Firewalls
34(1)
Host Hardening
35(1)
Cryptographic Protections
35(1)
Conclusions
36(6)
Synopsis
36(6)
Introduction
42(1)
The Initial Situation
42(1)
Applications
43(1)
Internet Applications
43(1)
File Sharing
44(1)
Printer Sharing
44(1)
Access Router and Cable Modem
44(2)
Access Router
44(1)
Cable Modem
44(1)
Coaxial Cable
45(1)
The Personal Computers
46(1)
Network Interface Cards (NICs)
46(1)
Device Driver
46(1)
Networking Software
46(1)
Wires, Connectors, and Jacks
47(2)
UTP Cords
47(1)
RJ-45 Connectors and Jacks
48(1)
Patch Cords
49(1)
The Access Router's Functions
49(4)
The Access Router's Ethernet Switch
49(1)
The Access Router's Router Function
50(1)
The Access Router's DHCP Server
50(1)
The Access Router's Network Address Translation (NAT) Function
51(2)
Adding Wireless Transmission
53(2)
The Problem with Wires
53(1)
Access Router/Wireless Access Point Alternatives
53(1)
Wireless NICs
54(1)
The Downstairs PC
55(1)
Reflections on Peer-to-Peer Networks Versus Dedicated Servers
55(3)
Peer-to-Peer Networks
55(2)
Inexpensive Networking
57(1)
Operational Problems
57(1)
Poor Security
57(1)
Dedicated Servers
57(1)
Network Attached Storage
57(1)
Case Analysis
58(1)
Introduction
59(1)
Setting Up an Internet Connection
60(3)
Initial Steps
60(1)
Next Steps
61(2)
Allowing Peer-to-Peer Directory and File Sharing
63(5)
Network Setup Wizard: Welcome to the Network Setup Wizard
63(1)
Network Setup Wizard: Before You Begin
63(1)
Network Setup Wizard: Select a Connection Method
63(3)
Network Setup Wizard: Your Computer Has Multiple Connections
66(1)
Network Setup Wizard: Give This Computer a Description and Name
66(1)
New Connection Wizard: Name Your Network
66(1)
Network Setup Wizard: Ready to Apply Network Settings
67(1)
Network Setup Wizard: Finish
68(1)
Accessing Shared Files
68(2)
Process
68(1)
Shared Documents (SharedDocs)
68(1)
Weak Security in Simple File Sharing
69(1)
Sharing Additional Directories
70(2)
Run the Network Setup Wizard
70(1)
Select Another Directory You Wish to Share
70(1)
In the Directory's Properties Dialog Box
71(1)
Still No Security
71(1)
Sharing Printers
72(5)
Making a Printer Available for Sharing
72(1)
Using a Shared Printer
73(4)
Case Study: XTR Consulting: A SOHO Network with Dedicated Servers
77(17)
Introduction
77(2)
Peer-to-Peer Service
79(2)
Inexpensive Networking
79(1)
Operational Problems
79(2)
Poor Security
81(1)
Dedicated Servers
81(6)
Benefits and Problems
81(1)
Server Technology
82(1)
Server Hardware
82(2)
Network Operating Systems (NOSs) for PC Servers
84(3)
XTR: The Initial Situation
87(1)
PCs
87(1)
Printers
87(1)
Sneakernet
87(1)
Remote Access
88(1)
Internet Access
88(1)
Maintenance
88(1)
Broad Network Design
88(5)
Labor Costs
88(1)
Switch
88(1)
Wires
88(1)
Network Interface Card (NIC)
89(1)
Dedicated Servers
89(1)
Dedicated Print Servers
90(1)
Internet Access
91(1)
Firewall
92(1)
Database Processing
92(1)
Remote Access Service (RAS)
93(1)
Your Detailed Design
93(1)
Network Standards
94(46)
Introduction
94(1)
Standards Govern the Exchange of Messages
95(5)
Message Semantics (Meaning)
96(1)
Message Syntax
96(2)
General Message Organization
98(1)
Fields in Headers and Trailers
99(1)
Reliability and Connections
100(4)
Reliability
100(2)
Connection-Oriented and Connectionless Protocols
102(2)
Connectionless and Unreliable Protocols Dominate
104(1)
Layered Standards Architectures
104(7)
Architectures
104(2)
Layer 1 and Layer 2 Standards for Single Networks (LANs and WANs)
106(1)
Physical Links
107(1)
Standards for Internet Transmission
108(2)
Standards for Applications
110(1)
Why Layered Architectures?
111(2)
Breaking Up Large Tasks into Smaller Tasks
111(1)
Specialization in Standards Design
111(1)
Simplification in Standards Design
112(1)
If You Change a Standard at One Layer, You Do Not Have to Change Standards at Other Layers
112(1)
Layers 1 (Physical) and 2 (Data Link) in Ethernet
113(2)
Ethernet Physical Layer Standards
113(1)
Ethernet Frames
113(2)
Ethernet Characteristics
115(1)
Layer 3: The Internet Protocol (IP)
115(3)
Layer 2 Versus Layer 3
115(1)
The IP Packet
116(2)
IP Characteristics
118(1)
Layer 4: The Transport Layer
118(3)
Layers 3 and 4
118(1)
TCP: A Reliable Protocol
119(1)
The User Datagram Protocol (UDP)
120(1)
Layer 5: HTTP and Other Application Standards
121(1)
Vertical Communication on Hosts, Switches, and Routers
121(6)
Layered Communication on the Source Host
121(4)
On the Destination Host
125(1)
On Switches and Routers Along the Way
126(1)
Major Standards Architectures
127(9)
TCP/IP and OSI Architectures
128(1)
OSI
129(3)
TCP/IP
132(2)
The Application Layer
134(1)
TCP/IP and OSI: The Hybrid TCP/IP-OSI Standards Architecture
134(1)
A Multiprotocol World at Higher Layers
135(1)
Standards at the First Bank of Paradise
136(1)
Physical and Data Link Layer Standards
136(1)
Protocols at Higher Layers
136(1)
Conclusion
136(4)
Synopsis
136(4)
Physical Layer Propagation: UTP and Optical Fiber
140(47)
Introduction: The Physical Layer
140(1)
Signals and Propagation
141(1)
Propagation
141(1)
Signals
141(1)
Propagation Effects
141(1)
Binary Data Representation
142(4)
Inherently Binary Data
142(1)
Binary Numbers
142(1)
Encoding Alternatives
143(1)
Text (ASCII and Extended ASCII)
144(1)
Raster Graphics
145(1)
Signaling
146(6)
Converting Data to Signals
146(1)
On/Off Signaling
146(1)
Binary Signaling
146(3)
Binary Signaling Versus Digital Signaling
149(1)
Multistate Digital Signaling
150(1)
Bit Rates
151(1)
Baud Rate
151(1)
An Example
151(1)
Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) Wiring
152(12)
4-Pair UTP and RJ-45
152(2)
Attenuation and Noise Problems
154(4)
Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) in UTP Wiring
158(2)
Serial and Parallel Transmission
160(2)
Wire Quality Standard Categories
162(2)
Optical Fiber
164(10)
Light Through Glass
164(1)
The Roles of Fiber and Copper
165(1)
Optical Fiber Construction and Operation
166(3)
Carrier Fiber
169(3)
LAN Fiber
172(2)
Noise and Electromagnetic Interference
174(1)
Network Topologies
174(2)
Point-to-Point Topology
175(1)
Star Topology and Extended Star (Hierarchy) Topology
175(1)
Mesh Topology
176(1)
Ring Topology
176(1)
Bus Topologies
176(1)
Conclusion
176(4)
Synopsis
176(4)
Introduction
180(1)
Solid and Stranded Wiring
180(1)
Solid-Wire UTP Versus Stranded-Wire UTP
180(1)
Relative Advantages
180(1)
Adding Connectors
180(1)
Cutting the Cord
181(1)
Stripping the Cord
181(1)
Working with the Exposed Pairs
182(2)
Pair Colors
182(1)
Untwisting the Pairs
182(1)
Ordering the Pairs
182(2)
Cutting the Wires
184(1)
Adding the Connector
184(1)
Holding the Connector
184(1)
Sliding in the Wires
184(1)
Some Jacket Inside the Connector
184(1)
Crimping
184(1)
Pressing Down
184(1)
Making Electrical Contact
184(1)
Strain Relief
185(1)
Testing
185(2)
Testing with Continuity Testers
185(1)
Testing for Signal Quality
185(2)
Ethernet Lans
187(46)
And the Winner Is . . .
187(1)
A Short History of Ethernet Standards
188(2)
Prehistory: Xerox, Intel, and Digital Equipment
188(1)
The 802 Committee
188(1)
The 802.3 Ethernet Working Group
188(1)
Other Working Groups
188(1)
Ethernet Standards Are OSI Standards
188(2)
Ethernet Physical Standards
190(7)
Major Ethernet Physical Layer Standards
190(4)
Link Aggregation (Trunking)
194(1)
Ethernet Physical Layer Standards and Network Design
194(3)
The Ethernet Frame
197(4)
Layering
197(1)
The Ethernel Frame's Organization
197(4)
Basic Data Link Layer Switch Operation
201(4)
Frame Forwarding with Multiple Ethernet Switches
201(1)
Hierarchical Switch Topology
202(2)
Only One Possible Path: Low Switching Cost
204(1)
Advanced Ethernet Switch Operation
205(10)
802.1D: The Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)
205(3)
Virtual LANs and Ethernet Switches
208(2)
Handling Momentary Traffic Peaks
210(3)
Hubs and CSMA/CD
213(1)
Broadcasting
213(1)
Media Access Control (MAC)
213(1)
CSMA/CD
213(1)
Full-Duplex Operation
213(1)
Latency
214(1)
Purchasing Switches
215(7)
Number and Speeds of Ports
215(1)
Switching Matrix Throughput
216(1)
Store-and-Forward Versus Cut-Through Switching
217(1)
Store-and-Forward Ethernet Switches
217(1)
Cut Through Ethernet Switches
217(1)
Manageability
218(2)
Advanced Purchasing Considerations: Physical and Electrical Features
220(1)
Physical Size
220(1)
Port Flexibility
220(1)
Uplink Ports
220(2)
Electricity
222(1)
Ethernet Security
222(1)
Port Access Control (802.1X)
222(1)
Media Access Control (MAC) Security (802.1AE)
222(1)
Conclusion
223(4)
Synopsis
223(4)
Introduction
227(1)
Token-Ring Technology
227(2)
Ring Networks
227(1)
Token Passing
228(1)
Early Ethernet and 802.5 Token-Ring Networks
229(2)
Early Ethernet: CSMA/CD-Bus Networks
229(1)
802.5 Token-Ring Networks Appear
230(1)
Ethernet Wins
230(1)
Shielded Twisted Pair Wiring
231(1)
Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI)
231(1)
Return of the Ring
232(1)
Wireless Lans (WLANs)
233(45)
Introduction
233(4)
802.11 Wireless LANs
233(3)
Bluetooth Personal Area Networks
236(1)
Emerging Local Wireless Technologies
236(1)
Radio Signal Propagation
237(13)
Frequencies
237(1)
Antennas
238(1)
Wireless Propagation Problems
239(2)
Bands and Bandwidth
241(4)
Normal and Spread Spectrum Transmission
245(2)
Spread Spectrum Transmission Methods
247(3)
802.11 WLAN Operation
250(6)
Typical Operation
250(3)
Controlling 802.11 Transmission
253(1)
Media Access Control
253(1)
CSMA/CA + ACK Media Access Control
253(1)
CSMA/CA
253(1)
ACK
254(2)
Request to Send/Clear to Send (RTS/CTS)
256(1)
802.11 Transmission Standards
256(6)
How Fast Are 802.11 Networks?
256(1)
802.11a
257(1)
802.11b
258(1)
802.11g: Today's Dominant Technology
258(1)
802.11a Redux?
259(1)
802.11n and MIMO
260(2)
802.11e Quality of Service (QoS)
262(1)
802.11 WLAN Security
262(7)
WLAN Security Threats
262(1)
WEP Security
263(2)
WPA (Wireless Protected Access)
265(1)
802.11i(WPA2)
266(1)
802.1X Mode Operation
266(2)
Pre-Shared Key (PSK) Mode
268(1)
802.11 Wireless LAN Management
269(3)
Access Point Placement
269(1)
Remote Management: Smart Access Points and Wireless Switches
270(2)
Bluetooth PANs
272(2)
Personal Area Networks (PANs) for Cable Replacement
272(1)
Disadvantages Compared to 802.11
273(1)
Advantages Compared to 802.11
273(1)
Bluetooth Trends
273(1)
Conclusion
274(4)
Synopsis
274(4)
Telecommunications
278(33)
Introduction
278(4)
Telecommunications and the PSTN
278(1)
The Four Elements of the PSTN
279(2)
Ownership of the PSTN
281(1)
Circuit Switching
282(3)
Circuits
282(1)
Voice Versus Data Traffic
283(1)
Dial-Up Circuits
283(1)
Leased Line Circuits
284(1)
The Access System
285(7)
The Local Loop
285(1)
The End Office Switch
286(1)
Analog-Digital Conversion for Analog Local Loops
286(3)
Codec Operations
289(1)
Analog-to-Digital Conversion
289(2)
Digital-to-Analog Conversion (DAC)
291(1)
Cellular Telephony
292(4)
Cellular Service
292(1)
Cells
292(1)
Why Cells?
293(1)
Handoffs Versus Roaming
294(1)
Cellular Telephone Standards
295(1)
Voice Over IP (VoIP)
296(5)
Basic Operation
296(1)
Corporate VoIP Alternatives
297(1)
Corporate Concerns with VoIP
298(1)
VoIP Technology
299(1)
Speech Codecs
299(1)
Transport
299(2)
Signaling in VoIP
301(1)
Residential Internet Access
301(7)
Telephone Modems
301(2)
Digital Subscriber Lines (DSLs)
303(2)
Cable Modem Service
305(1)
3C Cellular Data Service
306(1)
WiMax (802.16) Service
306(1)
Broadband over Power Lines
307(1)
Fiber to the Home (FTTH)
308(1)
Perspective on Speeds and Prices
308(1)
Conclusion
308(3)
Synopsis
308(3)
Wide Area Networks (WANs)
311(35)
Introduction
311(3)
WANs and the Telephone Network
311(1)
Reasons to Build a WAN
312(1)
High Costs and Low Speeds
313(1)
Carriers
313(1)
Point-to-Point Leased Line Networks
314(6)
Leased Line Networks for Voice and Data
314(1)
Leased Line Network Topologies
314(3)
Leased Line Speeds
317(2)
Digital Subscriber Lines (DSLs)
319(1)
Public Switched Data Networks (PSDNs)
320(4)
Leased Lines in Leased Line Data Networks
320(1)
Public Switched Data Network (PSDN) Access Lines
321(1)
The PSDN Cloud
321(1)
OAM&P: Operation, Administration, Maintenance and Provisioning
322(1)
Service Level Agreements (SLAs)
323(1)
Virtual Circuit Operation
323(1)
Frame Relay
324(4)
The Most Popular PSDN
324(1)
Components
324(3)
Frame Relay Virtual Circuits
327(1)
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)
328(2)
Not a Competitor for Frame Relay
328(1)
Designed for SONET/SDH
329(1)
Cell Switching
329(1)
ATM Quality-of-Service Guarantees
329(1)
Manageability, Complexity, and Cost
329(1)
Market Strengths
330(1)
Metropolitan Area Ethernet
330(3)
Metropolitan Area Networking
330(1)
E-Line and E-LAN
330(1)
Attractions of Metropolitan Area Ethernet
330(2)
Carrier Class Service
332(1)
Carrier IP Networks
332(1)
Virtual Private Networks (VPNs)
333(5)
The Attractiveness of Internet Transmission
333(2)
SSL/TLS
335(3)
Market Perspective
338(2)
Leased Line Networks
338(1)
Frame Relay
339(1)
Metropolitan Area Ethernet
340(1)
Virtual Private Networks (VPNs)
340(1)
Conclusion
340(2)
Synopsis
340(2)
Introduction
342(1)
Organizational Units
342(2)
Major Facilities
342(1)
Branches
342(2)
External Organizations
344(1)
The FBP Wide Area Network (WAN)
344(1)
T3 Lines
344(1)
Branch Connections
344(1)
Da Kine Island Affiliate Branch
344(1)
Credit Card Service
344(1)
Branch LANs
344(1)
Internet Access
344(1)
Anticipated Changes
344(2)
Outsourcing
344(1)
Fractional T1 Lines to Branches
344(2)
TCP/IP Internetworking
346(51)
Introduction
346(1)
TCP/IP Recap
347(1)
The TCP/IP Architecture and the IETF
347(1)
Simple IP at the Internet Layer
347(1)
Reliable Heavyweight TCP at the Transport Layer
347(1)
Unreliable Lightweight UDP at the Transport Layer
348(1)
IP Routing
348(6)
Hierarchical IP Addressing
349(1)
Routers, Networks, and Subnets
350(1)
Network and Subnet Masks
351(2)
Multiprotocol Routing
353(1)
How Routers Process Packets
354(7)
Switching Versus Routing
354(1)
A Simplified Routing Table
354(3)
A Routing Decision
357(1)
Perspective
358(1)
Two Routing Table Details
359(1)
Is the Destination IP Address in a Row's Address Range?
359(2)
Other Internet Layer Standards
361(15)
Dynamic Routing Protocols
361(4)
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
365(2)
Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS)
367(2)
Domain Name System (DNS)
369(2)
Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) for Supervisory Messages at the Internet Layer
371(1)
DHCP
372(1)
IPv4 Fields
372(3)
IPv6 Fields
375(1)
The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
376(5)
Fields in TCP/IP Segments
376(1)
Openings and Normal Closings
376(3)
Port Numbers
379(2)
The User Datagram Protocol (UDP)
381(1)
Layer 3 and Layer 4 Switches
382(2)
Layer 3 Switches
382(1)
Layer 4 Switches
383(1)
Application Switches (Layer 5 or Layer 7 Switches)
384(1)
Conclusion
384(5)
Synopsis
384(5)
What are WinDUMP and TCPDUMP?
389(1)
Working With WinDUMP
390(1)
Installing WinDUMP
390(1)
Running WinDUMP
390(1)
Getting Data to Capture
391(1)
Reading WinDUMP Output
391(2)
Opening the TCP Connection
391(1)
SYN
391(1)
SYN/ACK
392(1)
The HTTP Request Message
392(1)
The HTTP Response Message
393(1)
Ending the Connection
393(1)
Some Popular WinDUMP Options
393(1)
Major Options
393(1)
Example
394(1)
Expression
394(1)
Hexadecimal Printout
394(3)
ASCII versus Hex
394(1)
Hex Output
395(1)
TCP Fields
395(2)
Security
397(41)
Introduction
397(1)
Security Threats
397(12)
Viruses and Worms
399(3)
Human Break-Ins (Hacking)
402(3)
Denial-of-Service (DoS) Attacks
405(1)
Bots
406(1)
Attackers
407(2)
Planning
409(2)
Security Is a Management Issue
409(1)
Planning Principles
409(2)
Controlling Access
411(8)
Access Control Plans
411(1)
Authentication
412(1)
Passwords
413(2)
Digital Certificate Authentication
415(2)
Biometrics
417(2)
Firewalls, IDSs, and IPSs
419(8)
Firewalls
419(1)
Stateful Firewall Filtering
420(4)
Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs)
424(1)
Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) Filtering
425(1)
Multimethod Firewalls
426(1)
Protection with Cryptographic Systems
427(4)
Cryptographic Systems
427(1)
Encryption for Confidentiality
428(2)
Electronic Signatures
430(1)
Other Aspects of Protection
431(2)
Hardening Servers
431(2)
Vulnerability Testing
433(1)
Response
433(2)
Stages
433(1)
Major Incidents and CSIRTs
434(1)
Disasters and Disaster Response
435(1)
Rehearsals
435(1)
Conclusion
435(3)
Synopsis
435(3)
Hands-On: Windows XP Home Security
438(31)
Introduction
439(2)
Windows XP
439(1)
Service Pack 2
440(1)
Major Security Actions
440(1)
The Windows Security Center
440(1)
Backup
441(4)
The Need for Backup
441(1)
The Most Ignored Protection
441(2)
Backup Technology
443(1)
What to Backup
444(1)
Keeping Installation Disks
444(1)
Managing Backups
444(1)
Backup Software
444(1)
Perspective
445(1)
Windows Security Center
445(15)
The Center
447(1)
Automatic Updates
447(2)
Windows Firewall
449(4)
Internet Options for Privacy and Security
453(7)
Antivirus Scanning
460(9)
Virus Definitions Updates
461(1)
Configuration and Breadth of Protection
461(1)
Problems with Updates
461(8)
Network Management
469(30)
Network Management
469(1)
Cost Analysis
469(4)
Demand Versus Budget
469(1)
Labor Costs
469(2)
Carrier Fees
471(1)
Total Cost of Ownership (TCO)
471(2)
Network Simulation
473(5)
Network Simulation Purposes
473(1)
Before the Simulation: Collecting Data
473(1)
The Process
474(4)
IP Management
478(5)
IP Subnet Planning
478(2)
Administrative IP Servers
480(2)
Device Configuration
482(1)
Network Management Utilities
483(11)
Security Concerns
483(2)
Host Diagnostic Tools
485(4)
Route Analysis Tools
489(1)
Network Mapping Tools
489(1)
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
490(4)
Traffic Management Methods
494(2)
Momentary Traffic Peaks
494(1)
Traffic Shaping
495(1)
Conclusion
496(3)
Synopsis
496(3)
Networked Applications
499(32)
Introduction
499(1)
Networked Applications
499(1)
Traditional Application Architectures
500(3)
Hosts with Dumb Terminals
500(1)
Client/Server Systems
501(2)
Electronic Mail (E-Mail)
503(7)
Importance
503(1)
E-Mail Standards
504(1)
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)
504(2)
Receiving Mail (POP and IMAP)
506(1)
Web-Enabled E-Mail
506(2)
Viruses and Trojan Horses
508(1)
Spam
509(1)
The World Wide Web and E-Commerce
510(7)
The World Wide Web
510(3)
Electronic Commerce (E-Commerce)
513(1)
Links to Other Systems
514(1)
Application Servers
514(2)
E-Commerce Security
516(1)
Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA)
517(4)
Introduction
517(1)
Service Objects
518(2)
Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration (UDDI) Protocol
520(1)
Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Application Architectures
521(8)
Traditional Client/Server Applications
521(1)
PZP Applications
522(1)
Pure Peer-to-Peer Applications: Gnutella
523(1)
Using Servers to Facilitate P2P Interactions
524(3)
Processor Utilization
527(1)
Facilitating Servers and P2P-Applications
528(1)
The Future of P2P
528(1)
Conclusion
529(2)
Synopsis
529(2)
Module a More on TCP and IP
531(25)
Introduction
531(1)
General Issues
531(8)
Multiplexing
531(2)
More on TCP
533(1)
Numbering Octets
533(2)
Ordering TCP Segments upon Arrival
535(1)
The TCP Acknowledgement Process
536(1)
Flow Control: Window Size
536(1)
TCP Fragmentation
537(2)
Bidirectional Communication
539(1)
More on Internet Layer Standards
539(17)
Mask Operations
539(3)
IP Fragmentation
542(2)
Dynamic Routing Protocols
544(5)
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
549(2)
Classful Addresses in IP
551(2)
Mobile IP
553(3)
Module B More on Modulation
556(4)
Modulation
556(4)
Frequency Modulation
556(1)
Amplitude Modulation
556(1)
Phase Modulation
556(2)
Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM)
558(2)
Module C More on Telecommunications
560(26)
Introduction
560(1)
The PSTN Transport Core and Signaling
560(6)
The Transport Core
560(1)
Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) Lines
560(4)
Leased Lines and Trunk Lines
564(1)
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Transport
565(1)
Signaling
566(1)
Communication Satellites
566(5)
Microwave Transmission
566(1)
Satellite Transmission
567(1)
Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) Satellites
568(1)
Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) Satellites
569(1)
VSAT Satellites
570(1)
Wiring the First Bank of Paradise Headquarters Building
571(4)
Facilities
571(2)
Telephone Wiring
573(1)
Data Wiring
574(1)
Plenum Cabling
575(1)
PBX Services
575(1)
Carrier Services and Pricing
575(4)
Basic Voice Services
577(2)
Advanced Services
579(1)
Telephone Carriers and Regulation
579(7)
PTTs and Ministries of Telecommunications
581(1)
AT&T, the FCC, and PUCs
581(1)
Deregulation
582(4)
Glossary 586(35)
Index 621


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...