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  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1/30/2015
  • Publisher: W. H. Freeman

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The most successful calculus book of its generation, Jon Rogawski’s Calculus offers an ideal balance of formal precision and dedicated conceptual focus, helping students build strong computational skills while continually reinforcing the relevance of calculus to their future studies and their lives.

Guided by new author Colin Adams, the new edition stays true to the late Jon Rogawski’s refreshing and highly effective approach, while drawing on extensive instructor and student feedback, and Adams’ three decades as a calculus teacher and author of math books for general audiences.

W. H. Freeman/Macmillan and WebAssign have partnered to deliver WebAssign Premium – a comprehensive and flexible suite of resources for your calculus course. Combining the most widely used online homework platform with the authoritative and interactive content from the textbook, WebAssign Premium extends and enhances the classroom experience for instructors and students.

Author Biography

Jon Rogawski received his undergraduate degree (and simultaneously a master's degree in mathematics) at Yale, and a Ph.D. in mathematics from Princeton University, where he studied under Robert Langlands. Prior to joining the Department of Mathematics at UCLA, where he is currently Full Professor, he held teaching positions at Yale and the University of Chicago, and research positions at the Institute for Advanced Study and University of Bonn. Jon's areas of interest are number theory, automorphic forms, and harmonic analysis on semisimple groups. He has published numerous research articles in leading mathematical journals, including a research monograph entitled Automorphic Representations of Unitary Groups in Three Variables (Princeton University Press). He is the recipient of a Sloan Fellowship and an editor of The Pacific Journal of Mathematics. Jon and his wife Julie, a physician in family practice, have four children. They run a busy household and, whenever possible, enjoy family vacations in the mountains of California. Jon is a passionate classical music lover and plays the violin and classical guitar.
Colin Adams is the Thomas T. Read Professor of Mathematics at Williams College, where he has taught since 1985. He has produced a number of books that make mathematics more accessible and relatable, including How to Ace Calculus and its sequel, How to Ace the Rest of Calculus; Riot at the Calc Exam and other Mathematically Bent Stories; and Zombies & Calculus. Colin co-wrote and appears in the videos "The Great Pi vs. E Debate" and "Derivative vs. Integral: the Final Smackdown."

Adams received his undergraduate degree from MIT and his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. He had held various grants for research in the area of knot theory and low-dimensional topology and has published numerous research articles. He received the Haimo National Distinguished Teaching Award from the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) in 1998, and the Robert Foster Cherry Teaching Award in 2003. Adams also served as MAA Polya Lecturer (1998-2000), and as Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer (2000-2002).

Table of Contents

Rogawski/Adams: Calculus 3e Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Precalculus Review
1.1 Real Numbers, Functions, and Graphs
1.2 Linear and Quadratic Functions
1.3 The Basic Classes of Functions
1.4 Trigonometric Functions
1.5 Technology: Calculators and Computers
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 2: Limits
2.1 Limits, Rates of Change, and Tangent Lines
2.2 Limits: A Numerical and Graphical Approach
2.3 Basic Limit Laws
2.4 Limits and Continuity
2.5 Evaluating Limits Algebraically
2.6 Trigonometric Limits
2.7 Limits at Infinity
2.8 Intermediate Value Theorem
2.9 The Formal Definition of a Limit
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 3: Differentiation
3.1 Definition of the Derivative
3.2 The Derivative as a Function
3.3 Product and Quotient Rules
3.4 Rates of Change
3.5 Higher Derivatives
3.6 Trigonometric Functions
3.7 The Chain Rule
3.8 Implicit Differentiation
3.9 Related Rates
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 4: Applications of the Derivative 
4.1 Linear Approximation and Applications
4.2 Extreme Values
4.3 The Mean Value Theorem and Monotonicity
4.4 The Shape of a Graph
4.5 Graph Sketching and Asymptotes
4.6 Applied Optimizations
4.7 Newton’s Method
Chapter Review Exercises
Chapter 5: The Integral
5.1 Approximating and Computing Area
5.2 The Definite Integral
5.3 The Indefinite Integral
5.4 The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Part I
5.5 The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Part II
5.6 Net Change as the Integral of a Rate
5.7 Substitution Method
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 6: Applications of the Integral
6.1 Area Between Two Curves
6.2 Setting Up Integrals: Volume, Density, Average Value
6.3 Volumes of Revolution
6.4 The Method of Cylindrical Shells
6.5 Work and Energy
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 7: Exponential Functions
7.1 Derivative of f(x)=bx and the Number e
7.2 Inverse Functions
7.3 Logarithms and their Derivatives
7.4 Exponential Growth and Decay
7.5 Compound Interest and Present Value
7.6 Models Involving y’= k(y-b)
7.7 L’Hôpital’s Rule
7.8 Inverse Trigonometric Functions
7.9 Hyperbolic Functions
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 8: Techniques of Integration
8.1 Integration by Parts
8.2 Trigonometric Integrals
8.3 Trigonometric Substitution
8.4 Integrals Involving Hyperbolic and Inverse Hyperbolic Functions
8.5 The Method of Partial Fractions
8.6 Strategies for Integration
8.7 Improper Integrals
8.8 Probability and Integration
8.9 Numerical Integration
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 9: Further Applications of the Integral and Taylor Polynomials
9.1 Arc Length and Surface Area
9.2 Fluid Pressure and Force
9.3 Center of Mass
9.4 Taylor Polynomials
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 10: Introduction to Differential Equations
10.1 Solving Differential Equations
10.2 Graphical and Numerical Methods
10.3 The Logistic Equation
10.4 First-Order Linear Equations
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 11: Infinite Series
11.1 Sequences
11.2 Summing an Infinite Series
11.3 Convergence of Series with Positive Terms
11.4 Absolute and Conditional Convergence
11.5 The Ratio and Root Tests
11.6 Power Series
11.7 Taylor Series
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 12: Parametric Equations, Polar Coordinates, and Conic Sections 
12.1 Parametric Equations
12.2 Arc Length and Speed
12.3 Polar Coordinates
12.4 Area and Arc Length in Polar Coordinates
12.5 Conic Sections
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 13: Vector Geometry
13.1 Vectors in the Plane
13.2 Vectors in Three Dimensions
13.3 Dot Product and the Angle Between Two Vectors
13.4 The Cross Product
13.5 Planes in Three-Space
13.6 A Survey of Quadric Surfaces
13.7 Cylindrical and Spherical Coordinates
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 14: Calculus of Vector-Valued Functions 
14.1 Vector-Valued Functions
14.2 Calculus of Vector-Valued Functions
14.3 Arc Length and Speed
14.4 Curvature
14.5 Motion in Three-Space
14.6 Planetary Motion According to Kepler and Newton
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 15: Differentiation in Several Variables
15.1 Functions of Two or More Variables
15.2 Limits and Continuity in Several Variables
15.3 Partial Derivatives
15.4 Differentiability and Tangent Planes
15.5 The Gradient and Directional Derivatives
15.6 The Chain Rule
15.7 Optimization in Several Variables
15.8 Lagrange Multipliers:  Optimizing with a Constraint
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 16: Multiple Integration
16.1 Integration in Variables
16.2 Double Integrals over More General Regions
16.3 Triple Integrals
16.4 Integration in Polar, Cylindrical, and Spherical Coordinates
16.5 Applications of Multiplying Integrals
16.6 Change of Variables
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 17: Line and Surface Integrals
17.1 Vector Fields
17.2 Line Integrals
17.3 Conservative Vector Fields
17.4 Parametrized Surfaces and Surface Integrals
17.5 Surface Integrals of Vector Fields
Chapter Review Exercises

Chapter 18: Fundamental Theorems of Vector Analysis
18.1 Green’s Theorem
18.2 Stokes’ Theorem
18.3 Divergence Theorem

A. The Language of Mathematics
B. Properties of Real Numbers
C. Mathematical Induction and the Binomial Theorem
D. Additional Proofs of Theorems

Answers to Odd-Numbered Exercises

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