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Cane Nce 2E Pa

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780393931686

ISBN10:
0393931684
Format:
Textbook Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/17/2011
Publisher(s):
W W NORTON
List Price: $21.30

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Customer Reviews

A wonderful little book with great insight  April 15, 2011
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The first few chapters alone are worth having this book in your library. It reads like smooth passionate music, writing prose like poetry, capturing moments in history, in the past of our country, that many do not often think about. This textbook is amazing. I just want to say thank you to ecampus for shipping this book fast!






Cane Nce 2E Pa: 5 out of 5 stars based on 1 user reviews.

Summary

A masterpiece of the Harlem Renaissance and a canonical work in both the American and the African American literary traditions, Cane is now available in a revised and expanded Norton Critical Edition.

Originally published in 1923, Jean Toomer’s Cane remains an innovative literary work—part drama, party poetry, part fiction. This revised Norton Critical Edition builds upon the First Edition (1988), which was edited by the late eh, a pioneering scholar in the field of African American studies. The Second Edition begins with the editors’ introduction, a major work of scholarship that places Toomer within the context of American Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. The introduction provides groundbreaking biographical information on Toomer and examines his complex, contradictory racial position as well as his own pioneering views on race. Illustrative materials include government documents containing contradictory information on Toomer’s race, several photographs of Toomer, and a map of Sparta, Georgia—the inspiration for the first and third parts of Cane. The edition reprints the 1923 foreword to Cane by Toomer’s friend Waldo Frank, which helped introduce Toomer to a small but influential readership. Revised and expanded explanatory annotations are also included.

Backgrounds and Sources” collects a wealth of autobiographical writing that illuminates important phases in Jean Toomer’s intellectual life, including a central chapter from The Wayward and the Seeking and Toomer’s essay on teaching the philosophy of Russian psychologist and mystic Georges I. Gurdjieff, “Why I Entered the Gurdjieff Work.” The volume also reprints thirty of Toomer’s letters from 1919–30, the height of his literary career, to correspondents including Waldo Frank, Sherwood Anderson, Claude McKay, Horace Liveright, Georgia O’Keeffe, and James Weldon Johnson.

An unusually rich “Criticism” section demonstrates deep and abiding interest in Cane. Five contemporary reviews—including those by Robert Littell and W. E. B. Du Bois and Alain Locke—suggest its initial reception. From the wealth of scholarly commentary on Cane, the editors have chosen twenty-one major interpretations spanning eight decades including those by Langston Hughes, Robert Bone, Darwin T. Turner, Charles T. Davis, Alice Walker, Gayl Jones, Barbara Foley, Mark Whalan, and Nellie Y. McKay.

A Chronology, new to the Second Edition, and an updated Selected Bibliography are also included.

By far the most impressive product of the Negro Renaissance, Cane ranks with Richard Wright's Native Son and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man as a measure of the Negro novelist's highest achievement. Jean Toomer belongs to that first rank of writers who use words almost as a plastic medium, shaping new meanings from an original and highly personal style. (Robert A. Bone, The Negro Novel in America)

Table of Contents

Introduction
"Song of the Son": The Emergence and Passing of Jean Toomer
Jean Toomer's Racial Self-Identification: A Note on the Supporting Materials
*Draft Registration, June 5, 1917
*1930 Census
*Detail of 1930 Census
*1931 Marriage Certificate
*Draft Registration, April 24, 1942
The Text of Cane
Foreword to the 1923 Edition of Cane
Map of Sparta, Georgia
Backgrounds and Sources
Background Texts
The Cane Years
* Why I Entered the Gurdjieff Work
Correspondence
To Alain Locke, November 11, 1919
To Georgia Douglas Johnson, December 1919
To Georgia Douglas Johnson, January 7, 1920
To Georgia Douglas Johnson, February 20, 1920
To Alain Locke, December 24, 1920
To Alain Locke, January 26, 1921
To Alain Locke, November 8, 1921
To Alain Locke, November 1921
To Waldo Frank, March 24, 1922
Waldo Frank to Jean Toomer, April 25, 1922
To Waldo Frank, April 26, 1922
To Waldo Frank, August 21, 1922
To John McClure, July 22, 1922
To Claude McKay, July 23, 1922
To the Editors of The Liberator, August 19, 1922
To Alain Locke, October 1, 1922
To Gorham B. Munson, October 31, 1922
To Sherwood Anderson, December 18, 1922
To Sherwood Anderson, December 29, 1922
To Waldo Frank, December 1922
To Waldo Frank, December 12, 1922
To Alain Locke, January 2, 1923
To Waldo Frank, early January 1923
To Waldo Frank, early to mid January 1923
To Waldo Frank, early January 1923
To Horace Liveright, January 11, 1923
To Horace Liveright, February 27, 1923
To Horace Liveright, March 9, 1923
To Horace Liveright, September 5, 1923
To Countee Cullen, October 1, 1923
To Georgia O'Keeffe, January 13, 1924
To James Weldon Johnson, July 11, 1930
Criticism
Contemporary Reviews
A Review of Cane
A Review of Cane
The Younger Literary Movement
The Significance of Jean Toomer
Jean Toomer
Critical Interpretations
Jean Toomer
Gurdjieff in Harlem
[Jean Toomer's Cane]
The Failure of a Playwright
Introduction to the 1969 Edition of Cane
The Search for Black Redemption: Jean Toomer's Cane
A Key to the Poems in Cane
The Unity of Jean Toomer's Cane
Jean Toomer and the South: Region and Race as Elements within a Literary Imagination
The Divided Life of Jean Toomer
Looking Behind Cane
Textuality and Vision in Jean Toomer's Cane
Blues Ballad: Jean Toomer's "Karintha"
Jean Toomer and the "New Negroes" of Washington
Jean Toomer's Washington and the Politics of Class: From "Blue Veins" to Seventh-street Rebels
"Dorris Dances . . . John Dreams": Free Indirect Discourse and Female Subjectivity in Cane
Jean Toomer's Cane: Modernism and Race in Interwar America
Jean Toomer and the Avant-Garde
Jean Toomer's Cane: "Mixed-Blood" Impossibilities
Jean Toomer's Cane and the Erotics of Mourning
Jean Toomer, the Artist-An Unfulfilled American Life: An Afterword
A Chronology
Selected Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.


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