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Characteristics of and Strategies for Teaching Students With Mild Disabilities,9780205340699
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Characteristics of and Strategies for Teaching Students With Mild Disabilities

by ; ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780205340699

ISBN10:
0205340695
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon

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Summary

Describes the characteristics of students with mild disabilities, and clearly explains the best teaching practices for inclusion, behavior management, social skill instruction, and modifying classroom instruction for students with mild disabilities.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
PART ONE Characteristics of Students with Mild Disabilities
Foundations of Special Education for Students with Mild Disabilities
1(44)
Vignette: Jake, Mary, Felipe
3(1)
The Roots of Special Education
4(3)
Diversity
7(2)
Handicappism
9(3)
Litigation and Legislation
10(2)
Federal Laws
12(11)
Who Receives Special Education?
23(6)
Physical Reasons for Needing Special Education
24(1)
Cognitive Reasons for Needing Special Education
25(3)
Academic Reasons for Needing Special Education
28(1)
Communication Reasons for Needing Special Education
28(1)
Behavioral-Emotional Reasons for Needing Special Education
29(1)
How Many Students Receive Special Education?
29(3)
Students with Mild Disabilities
32(2)
Labeling
34(2)
Advantages of Labeling
34(1)
Disadvantages of Labeling
35(1)
Focus on What to Teach Students
36(1)
Individual Education Program
36(1)
Focus on Where to Teach Students
37(4)
Regular Classroom Placement
38(1)
Resource Room Placement
38(1)
Special Class Placement
38(2)
Special Day School Placement
40(1)
Homebound Programs
40(1)
Other Domiciled Settings
40(1)
Residential Programs
40(1)
Focus on How to Teach Students with Mild Disabilities
41(2)
Comparing General and Special Education
42(1)
Summary
43(1)
Activities
43(2)
Students with Mild Mental Retardation
45(45)
Vignette: Larry
47(1)
Intelligence
48(3)
Alfred Binet
49(1)
Intelligence Tests
49(2)
Definition and Identification
51(5)
Types of Mental Retardation
53(2)
Prevalence
55(1)
Causes of Mental Retardation
56(6)
Organic Causes
56(2)
Environmental Causes
58(4)
Disproportionate Representation of Minorities
62(1)
Characteristics
63(16)
Cognitive
63(5)
Mental Processing
68(2)
Academics
70(2)
Communication
72(3)
Perception / Mothor
75(2)
Social / Adaptive
77(2)
Teaching Strategies
79(8)
Instructions
79(2)
Thinking Skills
81(1)
Reading
82(1)
Functional Skills
83(1)
Adaptive Behavior
84(2)
Daily Living and Work Skills
86(1)
Summary
87(1)
Activities
88(2)
Students with Behavior Disorders
90(42)
Vignette: Fred Peterson
92(2)
Foundations of Behavior Disorders
94(1)
Historical Perspective
94(1)
Definition and Identification
95(3)
Issues and Concerns
96(1)
Levels of Behavior Disorders
97(1)
Prevalece of Emotional Behavior Disorders
98(3)
Causes of Behavior Disorders
101(12)
Biophysical Causes
101(8)
Psychodynamic Causes
109(1)
Psychoeducational Causes
110(1)
Behavioral Causes
111(2)
Disturbed or Disturbing?
113(2)
The Ecological Model
115(2)
Characteristics
117(7)
Cognitive
119(1)
Academic
120(1)
Communication
121(1)
Social-Adaptive
122(2)
Strategies for Teaching Students with Behavior Disorders
124(5)
Discipline
125(1)
Improving Emotional Problems
125(1)
Improving Social Problems
125(4)
Integration of Treatment Approaches
129(1)
Summary
129(1)
Activites
130(2)
Students with Specific Learning Disabilities
132(44)
Vignette: David
134(1)
Foundations of Learning Disabilities
135(11)
Early Research on Learning Disabilities
138(3)
Brain Research
141(4)
Causes of Learning Disabilities
145(1)
Definition and Identification
146(4)
Major Concepts and Key Phrases
146(3)
Discrepancy between Achievement and Intellectual Ability
149(1)
Prevalence of Learning Disabilities
150(1)
Characteristics
151(9)
Cognitive
152(1)
Mental Processing
153(2)
Academics
155(1)
Communication
156(2)
Perceptual-Motor
158(1)
Social/Adaptive
159(1)
Strategies for Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities
160(8)
Medical Model
162(1)
Psychological Process Model
162(2)
Behavioral Model
164(2)
Cognitive Model
166(2)
Young Adults
168(3)
Characteristics
170(1)
Alternative Strategies
171(1)
Looking to the Future
171(2)
Summary
173(1)
Activities
174(2)
Overview of Students with Mild Disabilities
176(38)
Tale of Three Students: Vignettes
178(1)
Cross-Categorical Characteristics of Students
179(8)
Generalities about Mild Learning Disorders
182(5)
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
187(5)
Educational Strategies for ADHD
190(2)
Causes of Mild Disabilities
192(9)
Organic Causes
194(3)
Environmental Causes
197(4)
Special Populations at Risk
201(10)
Infants, Toddlers, Preschoolers
201(1)
At-Risk School-Aged Youth
202(1)
School Dropouts
203(2)
Identification of Learning Problems
205(2)
Prereferral Intervention
207(1)
Referral to Special Education
208(1)
Multidisciplinary Evaluation and Eligibility
209(2)
Summary
211(2)
Activities
213(1)
PART TWO Teaching Students with Mild Disabilities
The Inclusive Classroom
214(33)
Vignette: Marsha
216(3)
Least Restrictive Environment
219(2)
Mainstreaming
221(1)
Inclusion
222(5)
Organizing Inclusion Programs
224(2)
Court Cases
226(1)
Collaboration
227(4)
Characteristics of Collaboration
228(2)
Collaboration as an Interdependent Style
230(1)
Inclusion Models
231(5)
Consulting Teacher
231(2)
Co-Teacher Model
233(2)
The Co-Teaching Plan
235(1)
Tips to Remember about Co- Teaching
236(1)
Collaborative Learning
236(5)
Peer Tutoring
237(2)
Cooperative Learning
239(2)
Working Together
241(3)
Teacher Expectations
241(1)
Classroom Organization
242(1)
Standardized Tests
243(1)
Administration
244(1)
Summary
244(2)
Activities
246(1)
Learning and Teaching
247(31)
Vignette
249(1)
The Purpose of School
250(5)
Student Perceptions of School
250(1)
Child and Adolescent Development
251(2)
The Hidden Curriculum
253(2)
Student Learning Styles
255(3)
Instructional Models
258(17)
Direct Instruction
259(1)
Precision Teaching
260(3)
Brain-Compatible Instruction
263(2)
Student-Centered Learning
265(3)
Learning Strategies
268(3)
Multisensory Instruction
271(1)
Task Analysis
271(1)
Functional Curriculum
272(3)
Integrated Teaching
275(2)
Summary
277(1)
Activities
277(1)
Instructional Modifications
278(33)
Vignette: Shirley Allen
280(1)
Instructing Students with Mild Disabilities
281(1)
Time Management
282(3)
Allocated Time
283(1)
Engaged Time
283(1)
Academic Learning Time
284(1)
The Physical Environment
285(2)
Climate
286(1)
Grouping for Instruction
286(1)
Selecting Instructional Materials
287(3)
Modification of Materials
288(1)
Reading
288(2)
Testing and Grading
290(2)
Alternatives to Tests
290(1)
Grades
291(1)
Communucation between Teachers and Students
292(2)
Attention
292(1)
Clarity of Language
293(1)
Questioning Skills
294(1)
Student Performance
294(7)
Self-Esteem
294(1)
Study Skills
295(2)
Organizational Skills
297(4)
Individualized Education Program
301(6)
Transition Plan
302(1)
Curriculum-Based Assessment
302(1)
Curriculum-Based Planning
303(1)
Curriculum-Based Monitoring
304(3)
The Educator's Tool Kit
307(2)
Summary
309(1)
Activities
310(1)
Classroom Management
311(31)
Vignette: Mr. Mellon
312(2)
Discipline---An Overview
314(1)
Preventive Discipline
315(6)
Know Yourself
315(3)
Know Your Students
318(1)
Classroom Organization
319(2)
Positive Behavioral Support
321(3)
Functional Behavioral Assessement
323(1)
Managing Student Behavior
324(8)
Behavior Modification
324(4)
Nonverbal and Verbal Techniques
328(2)
Verbal Interventions
330(2)
Conflict Situations
332(7)
Life Space Intervention
332(3)
Emotional First Aid
335(2)
Punishment
337(2)
Getting Rudy to Behave: Putting Theory Into Practice
339(1)
Summary
340(1)
Activities
341(1)
Teaching Social Skills
342(27)
Vignette: Debbie
343(1)
Emotional Intelligence
344(2)
Teaching Social Skills
346(5)
Selecting a Social Skills Curriculum
348(3)
A Sample Social Skills Curriculum
351(7)
Character Education
358(4)
Moral Development
362(2)
A Functional Model for Problem Behaviors
364(3)
Summary
367(1)
Activities
368(1)
Building Family Partnerships
369(36)
Vignette: Eileen
371(1)
America's Children
372(3)
Parents and Teachers: Valuable Partners
375(2)
Benefits of Parent-Teacher Cooperation
377(3)
Understanding Families
380(5)
Parent Feelings
380(2)
The Family Unit
382(3)
Support for Families
385(5)
Emotional Support
386(1)
Information
386(4)
Teacher-Parent Communication
390(7)
Written Communication
395(1)
Technology
396(1)
The Individual Education Program Meeting
397(4)
Summary
401(1)
Activities
402(3)
Appendix A A Chronology 405(24)
Appendix B Commonly Used Psychoactive Medications 429(4)
Appendix C Genetic, Prenatal, Perinatal, and Postnatal Disorders 433(3)
Appendix D Tests 436(7)
Appendix E Sample Individualized Education Plan (IEP) 443(2)
References 445(28)
Index 473


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