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Charlotte Temple

by ;
Edition:
Reprint
ISBN13:

9780195042382

ISBN10:
0195042387
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
2/19/1987
Publisher(s):
Oxford University Press
List Price: $14.99

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This is the Reprint edition with a publication date of 2/19/1987.
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Summary

The sentimental novels of the early national period were considered a danger to society and were criticized for the corrupting influence they had on the minds of their mostly young and female audience. They told tales of vice and intrigue that purported to be "based on fact" and alsoadvocated the need for better female education that would prepare young women against sweet-talking seducers. Extremely popular in America after the Revolution and throughout the nineteenth century, Charlotte Temple and The Coquette were two of the most successful novels of the period. Reprintedhere in their entirety, with Introductions by the literary scholar Cathy N. Davidson, they offer the modern student a glimpse at the earliest American popular fiction. Charlotte Temple, the most popular novel in America until Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, went through over 200 editions. It tells of a beautiful English girl who at the age of 15 is courted by and runs away with a British lieutenant named Montraville. Susanna Rowson, the daughter of a British naval officer, was one of the most accomplished women of the early national period. Actress, song-writer, novelist, poet, dramatist, and essayist, she was also the founder of one of the most progressive academies for young women of her day. Sheremained best-known, however, for Charlotte Temple, a novel that promised to be "of service to [the]...young and unprotected woman in her first entrance into life." In her Introduction, Cathy Davidson discusses the enormous popularity of the book and the life of Susanna Rowson, which was even more sensational than those of the characters depicted in the novel.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix(2)
Introduction xi(24)
Note on the Text xxxv(2)
Selected Bibliography xxxvii(2)
Chronology of Susanna Haswell Rowson xxxix
Advertisement from the original British edition (1791) 1(4)
Preface 5(3)
VOLUME I. Title page of the first American edition (1794)
8(1)
CHAPTER I. A Boarding School
9(2)
CHAPTER II. Domestic Concerns
11(4)
CHAPTER III. Unexpected Misfortunes
15(4)
CHAPTER IV. Change of Fortune
19(4)
CHAPTER V. Such Things Are
23(3)
CHAPTER VI. An Intriguing Teacher
26(3)
CHAPTER VII. Natural Sense of Propriety Inherent in the Female Bosom.
29(4)
CHAPTER VIII. Domestic Pleasures Planned
33(3)
CHAPTER IX. We Know Not What a Day May Bring Forth
36(3)
CHAPTER X. When We Have Excited Curiosity, It Is But an Act of Good Nature to Gratify It.
39(3)
CHAPTER XI. Conflict of Love and Duty.
42(2)
CHAPTER XII. Nature's last, best gift: Creature in whom excell'd whatever could To sight or thought be nam'd! Holy, divine! good, amiable, and sweet! How thou art falln'!
44(4)
CHAPTER XIII. Cruel Disappointment.
48(3)
CHAPTER XIV. Maternal Sorrow.
51(3)
CHAPTER XV. Embarkation.
54(3)
CHAPTER XVI. Necessary Digression.
57(3)
CHAPTER XVII. A Wedding
60(5)
VOLUME II.
CHAPTER XVIII. Reflections.
65(3)
CHPATER XIX. A Mistake Discovered.
68(3)
CHAPTER XX. Virtue never appears so amiable as when reaching forth her hand to raise a fallen sister. Chapter of Accidents.
71(5)
CHAPTER XXI. Teach me to feel another's woe, To hide the fault I see, That mercy I to others show That mercy show to me. Pope
76(3)
CHAPTER XXII. Sorrows of the Heart.
79(3)
CHAPTER XXIII. A Man May Smile, and Smile, and Be a Villain.
82(3)
CHAPTER XXIV. Mystery Developed.
85(4)
CHAPTER XXV. Reception of a Letter.
89(2)
CHAPTER XXVI. What Might Be Expected.
91(3)
CHAPTER XXVII. Pensive she mourn'd, and hung her languid head, Like a fair lily overcharg'd with dew.
94(4)
CHAPTER XXVIII. We Go Forward Again.
98(3)
CHAPTER XXIX. We Go Forward Again.
101(3)
CHAPTER XXX. And what is friendship but a name, A charm that lulls to sleep, A shade that follows wealth and fame, But leaves the wretch to weep.
104(3)
CHAPTER XXXI. Subject Continued.
107(3)
CHAPTER XXXII. Reasons Why and Wherefore.
110(2)
CHAPTER XXXIII. Which People Void of Feeling Need Not Read.
112(4)
CHAPTER XXXIV. Retribution.
116(2)
CHAPTER XXXV. Conclusion.
118


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