9781886969490

Chinese Fast Wrestling for Fighting : The Art of San Shou Kuai Jiao

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781886969490

  • ISBN10:

    1886969493

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1997-04-01
  • Publisher: Natl Book Network
  • Purchase Benefits
  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $22.95 Save up to $3.44
  • Buy New
    $19.51

    USUALLY SHIPS IN 3-5 BUSINESS DAYS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

One of China's top wrestling champions shows you how to take down any opponent.

Table of Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS vi(1)
ABOUT THE AUTHORS vii(4)
FOREWORD xi(1)
DR. YANG
JWING-MING
PREFACE xii(3)
MASTER LIANG
SHOU-YU
PREFACE xv
TAI D. NGO
Chapter 1. General Introduction
1(16)
1-1. Introduction
1(3)
1-2. General Principles of San Shou Kuai Jiao
4(11)
1-3. The Training Stages of San Shou Kuai Jiao
15(2)
2. Basic Training
17(26)
2-1. Introduction
17(1)
2-2. Warm Up Exercises
17(9)
2-3. San Shou Kuai Jiao Basic Stances/Leg Training
26(7)
2-4. San Shou Kuai Jiao Entering Training
33(4)
2-5. Falling
37(6)
Chapter 3. Basic Training With Equipment
43(18)
3-1. Introduction
43(1)
3-2. Body Conditioning With Equipment
44(17)
Chapter 4. Holding Leg(s) Throws
61(24)
4-1. Introduction
61(1)
4-2. Holding Leg(s) Throwing Techniques
62(23)
Chapter 5. Over the Back/Holding Throws
103(22)
5-1. Introduction
85(1)
5-2. Over Back Throwing Techniques
86(7)
5-3. Holding the Waist Throwing Techniques
93(10)
Chapter 6. Leg Hooking Throws
103(22)
6-1. Introduction
103(1)
6-2. Leg Hooking Techniques
104(21)
Chapter 7. Other Throwing Methods
125(32)
7-1. Introduction
125(1)
7-2. Throwing Techniques
126(31)
Chapter 8. Groundfighting/Controlling Techiques
157(22)
8-1. Introduction
157(1)
8-2. Groundfighting/Controlling Techniques
158(21)
Appendix A. Names of San Shou Kuai Jiao Techniques 179(3)
Appendix B. Translation and Glossary of Chinese Terms 182(6)
Index 188

Excerpts

Chapter 1 General Introduction 1-1. Introduction San Shou Kuai Jiao () refers to the techniques used in free fighting to take down or throw an opponent. Because San Shou Kuai Jiao emphasizes speed, it is known as Fast Wrestling. The words San Shou () in Chinese mean free fighting, and imply the use of bare handed martial skills. Kuai Jiao () means quickly downing or throwing an opponent. Traditionally, Chinese martial arts fighting techniques are divided into four general fighting categories: Ti (), Da (), Shuai (), Na (). Ti is kicking; Da is striking; Shuai (short for Shuai Jiao, ) is wrestling; Na is Qin Na (), i.e. seizing and controlling an opponent's joints and cavities. Generally speaking, when you encounter an opponent in a fight, leg techniques are used in long ranges and hand techniques are used for short ranges. To become a well-rounded martial artist, you must be proficient in the four basic fighting skills mentioned above. In the past, San Shou competition was held on the Lei Tai (), a 24 x 24 foot platform 5 feet high. Victory was decided when an opponent was thrown off the Lei Tai or knocked to the floor. Therefore, Shuai Jiao is an important part of San Shou fighting. A martial artist without any Shuai Jiao skills would not easily survive a San Shou match. Shuai Jiao is believed to be the oldest martial art in China. Its history can be traced back thousands of years. Legend tells that Shuai Jiao already existed during the reign of the Yellow Emperor (Huang Ti, 2697 B.C.) and was used to train soldiers. Throughout Chinese history the art has been adopted by governments of different dynasties as a military training method. However, Shuai Jiao was not only used as a tool for military training, but also widely practiced among civilians. It was the civilians who perfected and popularized the art. In the Song dynasty (960-1278 A.D.), Shuai Jiao skill had reached a very high level and fast wrestling (Kuai Jiao, ) already existed and was very popular. During this period, throws became more complex, and speed and skillfulness of movement was emphasized. Technically speaking, the foundation and basic principles of San Shou Kuai Jiao are based on traditional Chinese wrestling (Chuan Tong Shuai Jiao, ) and adapted for combat training. San Shou Kuai Jiao techniques and principles are very simple, effective and-most importantly-quick. Because of its speed and effectiveness, an opponent often does not have a chance to fight back. San Shou Kuai Jiao is an art that does not rely just on muscular strength-it must be done skillfully. It always emphasizes avoiding direct impact with an enemy's power. It also emphasizes getting close to an enemy quickly and using the enemy's power against himself. Because of its effectiveness, San Shou Kuai Jiao has been trained along with all styles of Chinese martial arts for thousands of years. San Shou Kuai Jiao can cause tremendous physical damage to an opponent.

Rewards Program

Write a Review