9780415305730

The Chinese Journalist: Mediating Information in the World's Most Populous Country

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780415305730

  • ISBN10:

    041530573X

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2003-10-20
  • Publisher: RoutledgeCurzon
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Summary

China, the most populous country in the world, is probably also the country changing the quickest. From a sullen backwater China is becoming a recognized force in world politics and the international economy. The principle mediators reflecting these changes to the Chinese and the rest of the world are journalists. But who are journalists in China and through what kind of transitions are they going through as the economy is freed up and the administration re-thought? The Chinese Journalist provides an intriguing introduction to Chinese journalists and their roles within society for both students of media and Asian Studies.

Author Biography

Hugo de Burgh is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Media and Communications at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

Table of Contents

Preface x
Chronology xii
Notes on the text xv
Introduction
1(13)
Why China matters
1(2)
Media power
3(7)
The free market argument and its limitations
10(2)
China's journalists
12(2)
The inheritance
14(14)
The Vice Chairman's Southern Progress
14(1)
From 1949--92
14(5)
Media institutions
19(2)
The Southern Progress
21(3)
The Party and the media
24(4)
Media characteristics
28(16)
The scope of the media
28(1)
Media reforms
29(5)
Variety and innovation in the printed media
34(2)
Television takes off
36(8)
The burden of the past I: from Yanan to the great proletarian Cultural Revolution
44(12)
Old ideas
44(1)
The CCP style
45(5)
Landmarks in the story of journalism
50(6)
The burden of the past II: from the Cultural Revolution to the Tiananmen massacre
56(16)
Towards the Cultural Revolution
56(6)
Journalism in the aftermath of the Cultural Revolution
62(5)
The democracy movement and Tiananmen massacre of 4 June 1989
67(2)
Echoes
69(1)
Journalism after the Tiananmen massacre
70(2)
The political context for journalism today
72(20)
Economic reforms and social consequences
72(3)
The political context as the leadership changes generations
75(7)
The emergence of public opinion
82(8)
Journalism after Jiang
90(2)
The patriot journalists
92(13)
Looking back to understand the future
92(7)
England contrasted
99(1)
The May 4 movement
100(2)
The `Golden Period'
102(1)
Conclusion
103(2)
The journalist as tribune
105(17)
Why `professionalism' is an issue
105(9)
Government
114(4)
Attempts to devise a regulatory framework
118(1)
Conclusion
119(3)
Becoming a journalist
122(17)
Imagining yourself a journalist
122(7)
The journalism establishment
129(2)
Studying journalism today
131(4)
The job and its power
135(1)
Perceptions and proclivities
136(3)
Who do they think they are?
139(19)
What is a journalist?
139(8)
The journalists they mention
147(5)
The journalist as the good official
152(3)
The journalist's journalist
155(1)
Journalism and public policy
156(2)
Making news: a case study
158(17)
The reasons for the case study
158(3)
The pilot
161(4)
The Hangzhou study
165(6)
Comparing Chinese and English journalists
171(4)
Conclusion: beliefs and practices, myths and realities
175(19)
An image
175(2)
Journalists and political factions
177(1)
Image and reality in journalists' identity
178(2)
Journalists and the reflection of social change and new expectations
180(8)
Commercialization
188(3)
A new self-image?
191(3)
Appendix A: glossary of names and terms 194(5)
Appendix B: Chinese glossary 199(5)
Notes 204(19)
Bibliography 223(18)
Index 241

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