9780231123228

Colonial Effects

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780231123228

  • ISBN10:

    0231123221

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2001-10-01
  • Publisher: Columbia Univ Pr

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Summary

Colonial Effects analyzes the creation and definition of modern Jordanian identity. Massad studies two key institutions-- the law and the military--and uses them to create an original and precise analysis of the development of Jordanian national identity in the postcolonial period.Joseph A. Massad engages recent scholarly debates on nationalism and richly fulfills the analytical promise of Michel Foucault's insight that modern institutions and their power to have productive, not merely repressive or coercive, capacities -- though Massad also stresses their continued repressive function.His argument is advanced by a consideration of evidence, including images produced by state tourist agencies aimed at attracting Western visitors, the changing and precarious position of women in the newly constructed national space, and such practices as soccer games, music, songs, food, clothing, and shifting accents and dialects.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xi
Introduction 1(1)
Law, Military, and Discipline
2(3)
Tradition and Modernity
5(3)
Historical Moments
8(2)
Jordan's Historical Moments
10(8)
Codifying the Nation: Law and the Articulation of National Identity in Jordan
18(32)
The Prehistory of Juridical Postcoloniality
22(3)
National Time
25(8)
National Space
33(2)
National Territory and Paternity
35(3)
Nationalizing Non-nationals
38(5)
Losing Nationality: The Law Giveth and the Law Taketh Away
43(2)
Women and Children
45(5)
Different Spaces as Different Times: Law and Geography in Jordanian Nationalism
50(50)
Different Species of Citizens: Women and Bedouins
51(5)
Bedouins and National Citizenship
56(10)
Nationalist Tribalism or Tribalist Nationalism: The Debate
66(7)
Jordanian Culture in an International Frame
73(6)
Women Between the Public and Private Spheres
79(9)
Women in Public
88(4)
Women and Politics
92(8)
Cultural Syncretism or Colonial Mimic Men: Jordan's Bedouins and the Military Basis of National Identity
100(63)
The Bedouin Choice
105(6)
Cultural Imperialism and Discipline
111(6)
Cultural Cross-dressing as Epistemology
117(14)
Imperialism as Educator
131(6)
Masculinity, Culture, and Women
137(6)
Transforming the Bedouins
143(5)
Education, Surveillance, and the Production of Bedouin Culture
148(15)
Nationalizing the Military: Colonial Legacy as National Heritage
163(59)
Anticolonial Nationalism and the Army
165(6)
King Husayn and the Nationalist Officers
171(7)
Clash of the Titans: Glubb Pasha and the Uneasy King
178(7)
``Arabizing'' the Jordanian Army
185(4)
The Palace Coup: The End of an Era
189(9)
Palace Repression and the Forgiving King
198(6)
Palestinians and the Military
204(3)
Threatening the Nation's Masculinity and Religious ``Tradition''
207(6)
The Military and the New Jordan
213(4)
Colonial or National Legacy?
217(5)
The Nation as an Elastic Entity: The Expansion and Contraction of Jordan
222(57)
Expanding the Nation: The Road to Annexation
226(1)
The Jericho Conference
227(6)
The New Jordan
233(2)
Palestinians and the West Bank
235(1)
Competing Representatives: The PLO and Jordan
236(4)
Toward Civil War
240(6)
A New Nationalist Era
246(4)
Clothes, Accents, and Football: Asserting Post-Civil War Jordanianness
250(8)
Contracting the Nation: The Road to ``The Severing of Ties''
258(5)
Who Is Jordanian?
263(13)
Concluding Remarks
276(3)
Notes 279(74)
Works Cited 353(18)
Index 371

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