9780521130936

Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780521130936

  • ISBN10:

    052113093X

  • Edition: Revised
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2010-02-11
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
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Summary

What kind of duty do we have to try to stop other people doing wrong? The question is intelligible in just about any culture, but few of them seek to answer it in a rigourous fashion. The most striking exception is found in the Islamic tradition, where 'commanding right' and 'forbidding wrong' is a central moral tenet already mentioned in the Koran. As an historian of Islam whose research has ranged widely over space and time, Michael Cook is well placed to interpret this complex subject. His book represents the first sustained attempt to map the history of Islamic reflection on this obligation. It covers the origins of Muslim thinking about 'forbidding wrong', the relevant doctrinal developments over the centuries, and its significance in Sunni and Shi'ite thought today. In this way the book contributes to the understanding of Islamic thought, its relevance to contemporary Islamic politics and ideology, and raises fundamental questions for the comparative study of ethics.

Table of Contents

Introduction
The goldsmith of Marw
Koran and Koranic exegesis
Tradition
Biographical literature about early Muslims
The Hanbalites
Ibn Hanbal
The Hanbalites of Baghdad
The Hanbalites of Damascus
The Hanbalites of Najd
The Mu'tazilities and Shi'ites
The Mu'tazilites
The Zaydis
The Imamis
Other Sects and Schools
The Hanafis
The Shafi'ites
The Malikis
The Ibadis
Ghazzali
Classical Islam in retrospect
Beyond Classical Islam
Modern Islamic developments
Origins and comparisons
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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