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Communicating in Groups : Applications and Skills,9780073042596
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Communicating in Groups : Applications and Skills

by ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780073042596

ISBN10:
0073042595
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/1/2005
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages

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Summary

Communicating in Groups offers a concise, step-by-step introduction to the theory and practice of small group communication, and teaches students to develop and apply critical thinking in group problem solving. With the firm belief that group participation can be an uplifting and energizing experience, authors Kathy Adams and Gloria Galanes give students the tools they will need in order to achieve this outcome. Research and theory are presented with a focus on what is important to students--understanding their group experiences and making them effective communicators.

Table of Contents

PART ONE Orientation to Small Group Systems
1(44)
Small Groups as the Heart of Society
2(22)
Groups in Your Life
4(3)
Groups as Problem Solvers
5(1)
Participating in Groups
5(2)
Groups versus Individuals as Problem Solvers
7(4)
When a Group Is a Good Choice
8(1)
When a Group Is Not a Good Choice
9(2)
Groups, Small Groups, and Small Group Communication
11(4)
Groups
11(1)
Small Groups
12(1)
Small Group Communication
13(2)
Classifying Groups by Their Major Purpose
15(5)
Primary or Secondary Groups
15(1)
Types of Secondary Groups
16(4)
Being an Ethical Group Member
20(1)
The Participant-Observer Perspective
21(3)
Groups as Structured Open Systems
24(21)
Overview of General Systems Theory
26(1)
The Small Group as a System
27(13)
Definition of a System
27(2)
Concepts Vital to Understanding Systems
29(6)
Characteristics of Systems
35(5)
Organizations as Systems of Groups
40(5)
PART TWO Foundations of Small Group Communicating
45(110)
Communication Principles for Group Members
46(20)
Communication: What's That?
49(5)
Implications for Small Group Communication
54(2)
Listening: Receiving, Interpreting, and Responding to Messages from Other Group Members
56(1)
Listening Defined
56(1)
Listening Preferences
57(1)
Habits of Poor Listeners
58(4)
Listening Actively
62(4)
Using Verbal and Nonverbal Messages in Small Group Communication
66(28)
Creating Messages in a Small Group
68(1)
How Communication Structures the Small Group
68(1)
Using Language to Help the Group Progress
69(12)
Follow the Rules
71(1)
Adjust to the Symbolic Nature of Language
72(2)
Use Emotive Words Cautiously
74(1)
Organize Remarks
75(2)
Make Sure the Discussion Question Is Clear and Appropriate
77(4)
Nonverbal Behaviors in Small Group Communication
81(8)
Principles of Nonverbal Communication
81(1)
Functions of Nonverbal Behaviors
82(2)
Categories of Nonverbal Behaviors
84(5)
Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) and Group Messages
89(5)
Creative and Critical Thinking in the Small Group
94(30)
What Is Creative Thinking?
96(2)
Enhancing Group Creativity
98(5)
Brainstorming
99(1)
Synectics
100(2)
Mind Mapping
102(1)
What Makes Thinking ``Critical''?
103(2)
Enhancing Critical Thinking in a Group
105(19)
Attitudes
105(2)
Gathering Information
107(3)
Evaluating Information
110(7)
Checking for Errors in Reasoning
117(3)
Asking Probing Questions
120(4)
Group Problem-Solving Procedures
124(31)
A Systematic Procedure as the Basis for Problem Solving
127(1)
What Is a Problem?
127(6)
Area of Freedom
128(1)
Adapting Procedures to Fit Your Problem
129(1)
Identifying Problems with a Problem Census
130(3)
Effective Problem Solving and Decision Making
133(17)
The Procedural Model of Problem Solving (P-MOPS)
135(1)
Describing and Analyzing the Problem
135(3)
Generating and Explaining Possible Solutions
138(1)
Evaluating All Possible Solutions
139(5)
Choosing the Best Solution
144(3)
Implementing the Chosen Solution
147(3)
Applications of P-MOPS
150(5)
PART THREE Understanding and Improving Group Throughput Processes
155(130)
Becoming a Group
156(30)
The Life Cycle of a Group
158(1)
Phases and Social Tensions in the Development of a Group
159(5)
Group Socialization of Members
164(4)
Phases of Group Socialization
164(4)
Group Roles
168(5)
Types of Roles
168(1)
Role Functions in a Small Group
168(3)
The Emergence of Roles in a Group
171(2)
Rules and Norms
173(5)
Development of Group Norms
174(1)
Enforcement of Group Norms
175(2)
Changing a Group Norm
177(1)
Development of a Group's Climate
178(8)
Trust
179(2)
Cohesiveness
181(1)
Supportiveness
181(5)
Celebrating Diversity in the Small Group
186(36)
What Is Diversity?
188(24)
Differences in Motives for Joining a Group
189(1)
Diversity of Learning Styles
190(3)
Personality Differences
193(3)
Cultural Diversity
196(16)
Celebrating Diversity/Bridging Differences
212(10)
Creating a Group Identity through Fantasy
212(1)
Using Symlog to ``Picture'' Diversity
212(10)
Managing Conflicts Productively
222(28)
What Is Conflict?
224(1)
Myths about Conflict
224(3)
Groupthink
227(7)
Symptoms of Groupthink
229(1)
Preventing Groupthink
230(4)
Managing Conflict in the Group
234(16)
Conflict Management Styles
234(5)
Expressing Disagreement
239(2)
Maximizing Your Chances to Influence the Group
241(1)
Nominal Group Technique
242(2)
Steps in Principled Negotiation
244(6)
Applying Leadership Principles
250(35)
Leadership and Leaders
252(4)
Leadership
252(1)
Sources of Power and Influence
252(2)
Leaders
254(2)
Myths about Leadership
256(2)
Current Ideas about Leadership
258(3)
The Functional Concept of Group Leadership
258(1)
The Contingency Concept of Group Leadership
259(2)
What Good Leaders Do
261(16)
What Group Members Expect Leaders to Do
263(1)
Performing Administrative Duties
263(5)
Leading Group Discussions
268(7)
Developing the Group
275(2)
Encouraging Distributed Leadership
277(3)
Ethical Guidelines for Group Leaders
280(5)
PART FOUR Small Group Public Presentations
285
Planning, Organizing, and Presenting Small Group Oral Presentations
286
The Planning Stage
287(7)
Your Audience
288(1)
Your Occasion
289(1)
Your Purpose
289(1)
Your Subject or Topic
289(1)
Member Strengths and Difficulties
290(1)
Supplemental Logistics
290(1)
Types of Group Oral Presentations
291(3)
The Organizing Stage
294(8)
Delegate Duties
294(1)
Gather Verbal and Visual Materials
294(3)
Organize Materials and Presentation
297(5)
The Presenting Stage
302(2)
Check Your Language
302(1)
Practice Aloud
302(2)
What Makes a Good Oral Presentation?
304
Appendix: Techniques for Observing Problem-Solving Groups 1(1)
References 1(1)
Bibliography 1(1)
Index 1


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