CART

(0) items

Communication & Education Skills for Dietetics Professionals,9780781737401
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Communication & Education Skills for Dietetics Professionals

by ; ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780781737401

ISBN10:
0781737400
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
4/21/2003
Publisher(s):
Lippincott Willams & Wilkins

Related Products


  • Communication and Education Skills for Dietetics Professionals
    Communication and Education Skills for Dietetics Professionals
  • Nutrition Counseling and Education Skills for Dietetics Professionals
    Nutrition Counseling and Education Skills for Dietetics Professionals





Summary

Strong communications skills are essential for dietetics professionals helping patients improve their nutrition and eating habits. Based on the 2002 Commission on Accreditation in Dietetics (CADE) standards for education, this text aids nutritionists, dietitians, and allied health professionals in strengthening interpersonal relationships with clients and patients by offering current activities, case studies, techniques, and directives related to nutritional counseling. The Fourth Edition is updated with a guide to online resources, behavioral objectives, additional case studies, and new illustrations. The American Dietetic Association's competencies on communication are included. Also included is an online instructor's manual containing answers to the review and discussion questions, as well as information on each case study.

Table of Contents

Challenges for Dietetics Professionals
Origins of Food Habits or Behaviors
2(3)
Dietary Adherence
5(2)
Management Practice in Dietetics
7(1)
American Dietetic Association Knowledge and Skill Requirements
8(1)
Dietetic Practice Groups
9(5)
Communication
Effective Communication Operationally Defined
14(1)
Interpersonal Communication Model
15(2)
Verbal and Nonverbal Communication
17(11)
Listening Skills
28(1)
Negotiation
29(2)
Communicating With Legislators
31(7)
Interviewing
Nutrition Interviews
38(1)
Pre-Employment Interviews
39(1)
Conditions Facilitating Interviews
40(4)
Parts of the Interview
44(1)
Opening
45(1)
Exploration Phase
46(7)
Responses
53(6)
Closing the Interview
59(8)
Counseling
Rogerian Client-Centered (Nondirective) Counseling
67(1)
Counseling Processes
68(1)
Motivational Interviewing
69(5)
Counseling As A Four-Stage Process
74(1)
Directive Counseling
75(8)
Nutrition Counseling
Goals of Nutrition Counseling
83(2)
Model of the Nutrition Counseling Process
85(1)
Assessment
85(6)
Goal Setting
91(5)
Intervention and Treatment
96(2)
Evaluation of Outcomes and Follow-Up
98(1)
Documentation
99(1)
Expanding Roles for Dietitians
100(12)
Counseling for Behavior Modification
Diane Rigassio Radler
Classical Conditioning
112(1)
Operant Conditioning
113(1)
Modeling
114(1)
Changing Eating Behaviors
115(8)
Self-Monitoring
123(1)
Self-Management
124(1)
Social Support
125(1)
Applications
126(5)
Implications for Therapy
131(6)
Counseling for Cognitive Change
Cognitions
137(6)
Self-Efficacy
143(5)
Relapse Prevention
148(15)
Cross-Cultural and Life-Span Counseling
Workplace Diversity
163(1)
Cultural Competence in Counseling
164(5)
Counseling Throughout the Life Span
169(13)
Limited Literacy
182(9)
Motivating Clients and Employees
Motivation of Clients and Patients
191(2)
Motivation of Employees
193(3)
Contemporary Theories of Motivation
196(6)
Summary of Recommendations
202(5)
Principles and Theories of Learning
Learning and Learning Theories
207(1)
Behavioral Learning Theories
208(3)
Social Cognitive Theory
211(2)
Cognitive Theories
213(2)
Memory
215(4)
Transfer of Learning
219(1)
Andragogy
220(3)
Learning Styles and Teaching Styles
223(2)
Diffusion of Innovations
225(6)
Planning Learning
Teaching, Learning, and Education
231(2)
Environment for Learning
233(1)
Steps to Education
234(1)
Needs Assessment
235(2)
Performance Objectives
237(5)
Domains of Learning
242(9)
Determining the Content
251(1)
Organizing Training Groups
251(5)
Implementing and Evaluating Learning
Selecting and Implementing Learning Activities
256(1)
Techniques and Methods
257(7)
Task Analysis
264(1)
Job Instruction Training
265(2)
Sequence of Instruction
267(1)
Evaluation of Results
268(12)
Reliability and Validity
280(1)
Lesson Plans/Program Plans
281(1)
Documentation
282(8)
Group Facilitation and Dynamics
Characteristics of an Effectively Operating Team
290(2)
Stimulating Change in Teams/Groups
292(1)
Cohesiveness in Groups
293(2)
The Relationship of Cohesiveness to Change in Groups
295(2)
Informal Work Groups
297(1)
Facilitator Preparation
298(1)
Group Facilitation Skills
298(4)
Facilitator/Participant Functions
302(2)
Paradox of Group Dynamics
304(1)
Synergy
304(2)
Guidelines for Seeking Consensus
306(1)
Group Participation in Decision-Making
307(2)
Groups as Supplement to Individual Counseling
309(7)
Delivering Oral Presentations and Conducting Workshops
Advance Planning and Organization for the Presentation
316(1)
Introduction Critical to Speaker Credibility
317(1)
Key Objectives of the Body of the Presentation
318(1)
Concluding A Presentation
318(1)
Correlation Between Form and Speaker Credibility
319(1)
Media as Related to Presenter's Credibility
319(1)
Oral Presentations
320(2)
Delivering the Presentation
322(4)
Post-Presentation
326(1)
Workshops
326(2)
Communicating Through the Mass Media
328(7)
Planning, Selecting, and Using Instructional Media
Benefits of Visual Media
335(1)
Planning Visual Media
336(1)
Art and Design Principles
337(3)
Asynchronous or Synchronous Learning
340(1)
The Environment for the Synchronous Presentation
341(1)
Kinds of Visual Media
342(12)
Purchasing Prepared Media Materials
354(2)
Giving Presentations
356(1)
Evaluating Results
356(1)
The Future Generation
356(6)
Index 362


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...