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Communication in History : Technology, Culture, Society,9780205483884
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Communication in History : Technology, Culture, Society

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780205483884

ISBN10:
0205483887
Media:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $136.00
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Summary

Communication in Historyrs"s outstanding selection of readings from classic and contemporary sources gives an extensive overview of the most important ideas in the field. Encompassing topics as wide-ranging as the role of printing in the rise of the modern state and the role of the Internet in the Information Age, this anthology reveals how media have been influential both in maintaining social order and as powerful agents of change. Revised with new readings for the fifth edition, Communication in History continues to be, as one reviewer wrote, "the only text in the sea of History of Mass Communication texts that introduces students to a more expansive, intellectually enlivening study of the relationship between human history and communication history." New to This Edition bull; bull;Includes two new entries on radio that enhance student srs" understanding of the role of radio networks and advertisers in the 1930s and 1940s, and explore radiors"s transformation following the rise of television bull; bull;Enriches coverage of digital communication and new media to make the text more up-to-date and a better guide for assessing contemporary technological change bull; bull;Adds an entry on communication and monastic culture in the Middle Ages, further expanding the textrs"s history coverage and giving students insight into the impact of communication and culture in this time period bull; bull;Revisits the classic encounter between two preeminent media critics, Camille Paglia and the late Neil Postman bull; bull;Enriches coverage of early writing with a new piece by Denise Schmandt-Besserat that reinterprets previous archeological finds Praise for Communication in History "There are a number of competitors, but none really do what this does, which is to deal with communication through history without overemphasizing the current media. Most of the history books are industry centered. This book is communication centeredhellip; and that is commendable." Daniel G. McDonald, The Ohio State University

Table of Contents

Foreword xi
Preface xv
PART I The Media of Early Civilization
1(42)
The Art and Symbols of Ice Age Man, Alexander Marshack
5(9)
The Earliest Precursor of Writing, Denise Schmandt-Besserat
14(9)
Media in Ancient Empires, Harold Innis
23(7)
Civilization without Writing---The Incas and the Quipu, Marcia Ascher and Robert Ascher
30(6)
The Origins of Writing, Andrew Robinson
36(7)
PART II The Tradition of Western Literacy
43(38)
The Alphabet, Johanna Drucker
46(9)
The Greek Legacy, Eric Havelock
55(6)
Writing and the Alphabet Effect, Robert K. Logan
61(5)
Orality, Literacy, and Modern Media, Walter Ong
66(7)
Communication and Faith in the Middle Ages, James Burke and Robert Ornstein
73(8)
PART III The Print Revolution
81(36)
Paper and Block Printing---From China to Europe, Thomas F. Carter
85(6)
The Invention of Printing, Lewis Mumford
91(4)
The Rise of the Reading Public, Elizabeth Eisenstein
95(9)
Early Modern Literacies, Harvey J. Graff
104(9)
The Trade in News, John B. Thompson
113(4)
PART IV Electricity Creates the Wired World
117(40)
The Optical Telegraph, Daniel Headrick
121(9)
Telegraphy---The Victorian Internet, Tom Standage
130(6)
The New Journalism, Michael Schudson
136(7)
The Telephone Takes Command, Claude S. Fischer
143(7)
Time, Space, and the Telegraph, James W. Carey
150(7)
PART V Image Technologies and the Emergence of Mass Society
157(46)
Early Photojournalism, Ulrich Keller
161(8)
Dream Worlds of Consumption, Rosalynd Williams
169(7)
Early Motion Pictures, Daniel Czitrom
176(8)
Movies Talk, Scott Eyman
184(6)
Mass Media and the Star System, Jib Fowles
190(7)
Advertising and the Idea of Mass Society, Jackson Lears
197(6)
PART VI Radio Days
203(38)
Wireless World, Stephen Kern
207(3)
Early Radio, Susan J. Douglas
210(7)
The Golden Age of Programming, Christopher Sterling and John M. Kittross
217(6)
Radio Voices, Michele Hilmes
223(7)
Radio in the Television Age, Peter Fornatale and Joshna E. Mills
230(4)
Understanding Radio, Marshall McLuhan
234(7)
PART VII TV Times
241(56)
Television Begins, William Boddy
244(10)
The New Languages, Edmund Carpenter
254(5)
Making Room for TV, Lynn Spigel
259(9)
The Sixties Counterculture on TV, Aniko Bodroghkozy
268(8)
Television Transforms the News, Mitchell Stephens
276(7)
Two Cultures---Television versus Print, Neil Postman and Camille Paglia
283(14)
PART VIII New Media and Old in the Information Age
297(40)
The Control Revolution, James Beniger
301(10)
The Social Shape of Electronics, Ruth Schwartz Cowen
311(8)
How Media Became New, Lev Manovich
319(4)
Popularizing the Internet, Janet Abbate
323(5)
The World Wide Web, Jay David Bolter and Richard Grusin
328(9)
Suggested Readings 337(3)
Credits 340(3)
Index 343


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