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Communication in History : Technology, Culture, and Society,9780321088055
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Communication in History : Technology, Culture, and Society

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780321088055

ISBN10:
0321088050
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $125.60
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Summary

Communication in History's outstanding selection of readings from classic and contemporary sources gives an extensive overview of the most important ideas in the field.Encompassing topics as wide-ranging as the role of printing in the rise of the modern state and the role of the Internet in the Information Age, this anthology reveals how media have been influential both in maintaining social order and as powerful agents of change. Revised with new readings for the Fourth Edition, Communication in History continues to be, as one reviewer wrote, "the only book in the sea of History of Mass Communication books that introduces the reader to a more expansive, intellectually enlivening study of the relationship between human history and communication history."For anyone interested in media history, history of communication, the relationship of the media and society.

Table of Contents

I. THE MEDIA OF EARLY CIVILIZATION.

1. The Art and Symbols of Ice Age Man, Alexander Marshack.

2. The Evolution of Symbols in Prehistory, Denise Schmandt-Besserat.

3. The New Rosetta Stone, Richard Rudgley.

4. Media in Ancient Empires, Harold Innis.

5. Civilizations without Writing—the Incas and the Quipu, Marcia Ascher and Robert Ascher.

6. The Origins of Writing, Andrew Robinson.

II. THE TRADITION OF WESTERN LITERACY.

7. The Alphabet, Johanna Drucker.

8. The Greek Legacy, Eric Havelock.

9. Writing and the Alphabetic Effect, Robert K. Logan.

10. Orality, Literacy, and Modern Media, Walter Ong.

11. A Medieval Library, Umberto Eco.

12. Communication in the Middle Ages, James Burke.

III. THE PRINT REVOLUTION.

13. Paper and Block Printing—From China to Europe, T. F. Carter.

14. The Invention of Printing, Lewis Mumford.

15. The Rise of the Reading Public, Elizabeth Eisenstein.

16. Early Modern Literacies, Harvey J. Graff.

17. The Trade in News, John B. Thompson.

18. Files, Bureaucrats, and Intellectuals, Robert Darnton.

IV. ELECTRICITY CREATES THE WIRED WORLD.

19. The Optical Telegraph, Daniel Headrick.

20. Telegraphy—The Victorian Internet, Tom Standage.

21. The New Journalism, Michael Schudson.

22. The Telephone Takes Command, Claude S. Fischer.

23. Inventing the Expert, Carolyn Marvin.

24. Time, Space, and the Telegraph, James Carey.

V. IMAGE TECHNOLOGIES AND THE EMERGENCE OF MASS SOCIETY.

25. On Photography, Susan Sontag.

26. Early Photojournalism, Ulrich Keller.

27. Dream Worlds of Consumption, Rosalyn Williams.

28. Early Motion Pictures, Daniel Czitrom.

29. Mass Media and the Star System, Jib Fowles.

30. Advertising and the Idea of Mass Society, Jackson Lears.

VI. RADIO DAYS.

31. Wireless World, Stephen Kern.

32. Early Radio, Susan J. Douglas.

33. Movies Talk, Scott Eyman.

34. The Golden Age of Programming, Christopher Sterling and John M. Kittross.

35. Radio and Race, Gerald Nachman.

36. Understanding Radio, Marshall McLuhan.

VII. TV TIMES.

37. Television Begins, William Boddy.

38. The New Languages, Edmund Carpenter.

39. Making Room for TV, Lynn Spigel.

40. The Sixties Counterculture on TV, Aniko Bodroghkozy.

41. Television Transforms the News, Mitchell Stephens.

42. Two Cultures—Television versus Print, Neil Postman and Camille Paglia.

VIII. NEW MEDIA AND OLD IN THE INFORMATION AGE.

43. The Control Revolution, James Beniger.

44. How Media Became New, Lev Manovich.

45. The Hypermedia Environment, Ronald J. Deibert.

46. Popularizing the Internet, Janet Abbate.

47. From Codex to Homepage, James J. O'Donnell.

48. A World Wide Web, Jay David Bolter and Richard Grusin.

Suggested Readings.



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