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Communication : Making Connections,9780205335428
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Communication : Making Connections

by ;
ISBN13:

9780205335428

ISBN10:
020533542X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
6/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

Questions About This Book?

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This is the edition with a publication date of 6/1/2001.
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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

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Table of Contents

Boxed Features xvi
Preface xix
PART ONE Making Connections Through Communication
Connecting Process and Principles
2(30)
What is Communication?
5(3)
Why Should We Study Communication?
8(5)
Communication and Career Development
8(1)
Communication and Ethical Behavior
9(1)
Communication and Our Multicultural Society
10(2)
Communication and Our Technological Society
12(1)
Principles of Communication
13(4)
Communication Is a Process
14(1)
Communication Is a System
14(1)
Communication Is Interactional and Transactional
15(1)
Communication Can Be Intentional or Unintentional
16(1)
Essential Components of Communication
17(6)
Source
19(1)
Message
20(1)
Interference
20(1)
Channel
20(1)
Receiver
21(1)
Feedback
21(2)
Environment
23(1)
Context
23(1)
Types of Communication
23(3)
Intrapersonal Communication
24(1)
Interpersonal Communication
24(1)
Public Communication
25(1)
Misconceptions About Communication
26(1)
Communication Is a Cure-All
26(1)
Quantity Means Quality
26(1)
Meaning Is in the Words We Use
26(1)
We Have a Natural Ability to Communicate
27(1)
Myth 5: Communication Is Reversible
27(1)
Improving Communication Competence
27(1)
Summary
28(2)
Discussion Starters
30(1)
Answers and Explanations
30(1)
Notes
31(1)
Connecting Perceptions and Communication
32(26)
Understanding Perception
35(1)
Awareness
35(1)
Cognitive Process
35(1)
Language
36(1)
The Perception Process
36(7)
Selection
37(1)
Organization
38(2)
Interpretation
40(3)
Perceptual Differences
43(9)
Perceptual Set
44(2)
Attribution Error
46(1)
Physical Characteristics
47(1)
Psychological State
48(1)
Cultural Background
48(3)
Gender
51(1)
Media
51(1)
Improving Perception Competencies
52(3)
Become an Active Perceiver
52(1)
Recognize That Each Person's Frame of Reference Is Unique
53(1)
Distinguish Facts from Inferences
53(1)
Recognize That People, Objects, and Situations Change
53(1)
Become Aware of the Role Perceptions Play in Communication
53(1)
Keep an Open Mind
54(1)
Summary
55(1)
Discussion Starters
56(1)
Answers and Explanations
57(1)
Notes
57(1)
Connecting Self and Communication
58(24)
Self-Concept and Its Connection to Communication
60(18)
Self-Concept as a Process
62(1)
Development of Self-Concept
63(4)
The Hierarchy of Self-Concept
67(2)
Communication and Self-Concept
69(1)
Self-Fulfilling Prophecy and Impression Management
70(1)
Culture and Self-Concept
71(2)
Gender and Self-Concept
73(5)
Improving the Self-Concept
78(1)
Summary
79(1)
Discussion Starters
80(1)
Notes
80(2)
Connecting Through Verbal Communication
82(32)
The Importance of Language
84(3)
Language Is Powerful
85(1)
Language Affects Thought
85(2)
The Elements of Language
87(8)
Sounds
87(1)
Words
87(1)
Grammar
87(2)
Meaning
89(6)
Language-Based Barriers to Communication
95(10)
Meanings Can Be Misunderstood
96(2)
Language Can Shape Our Attitudes
98(1)
Language Can Cause Polarization
99(1)
Language Can Be Sexist
100(3)
Culture Affects Language Use
103(2)
How to Use Language Effectively
105(5)
Use Accurate Language
105(1)
Use Vivid Language
106(1)
Use Immediate Language
107(2)
Use Appropriate Language
109(1)
Use Metaphorical Language
109(1)
Summary
110(2)
Discussion Starters
112(1)
Notes
112(2)
Connecting Through Nonverbal Communication
114(32)
Characteristics of Nonverbal Communication
117(3)
Nonverbal Communication Occurs Constantly
117(1)
Nonverbal Communication Depends on Context
117(1)
Nonverbal Communication Is More Believable Than Verbal Communication
118(1)
Nonverbal Communication Is a Primary Means of Expression
118(1)
Nonverbal Communication Is Related to Culture
119(1)
Nonverbal Communication Is Ambiguous
119(1)
Types of Nonverbal Communication
120(15)
Facial Expressions and Body Movements
121(5)
Physical Characteristics
126(2)
Touch
128(2)
Space
130(2)
Time
132(1)
Paralanguage
133(1)
Artifacts
134(1)
Environment
134(1)
Functions of Nonverbal Communication
135(3)
Complementing Verbal Behavior
135(1)
Repeating Verbal Behavior
136(1)
Regulating Verbal Behavior
136(1)
Substituting for Verbal Behavior
136(1)
Deceiving
137(1)
Interpreting Nonverbal Communication
138(3)
Improving Our Interpretation of Nonverbal Communication
139(1)
Improving the Nonverbal Communication We Send
139(2)
Summary
141(2)
Discussion Starters
143(1)
Notes
143(3)
Connecting Listening and Thinking in the Communication Process
146(22)
The Importance of Effective Listening
148(2)
Listening and Hearing: Is There a Difference?
150(1)
The Stages of Effective Listening
151(4)
Hearing
151(1)
Selecting
151(1)
Attending
152(1)
Understanding
152(1)
Evaluating
153(1)
Remembering
153(1)
Responding: Sending Feedback
154(1)
The Functions of Listening
155(2)
Listening to Obtain Information
156(1)
Listening to Evaluate
156(1)
Listening with Empathy
156(1)
Listening for Enjoyment
157(1)
Barriers to Effective Listening
157(3)
Considering the Topic or Speaker Uninteresting
157(1)
Criticizing the Speaker Instead of the Message
157(1)
Concentrating on Details, Not Main Ideas
158(1)
Avoiding Difficult Listening Situations
158(1)
Tolerating or Failing to Adjust to Distractions
158(1)
Faking Attention
159(1)
Critical Listening and Critical Thinking: Analyzing and Evaluating Messages
160(3)
Assessing the Speaker's Motivation
161(1)
Judging the Accuracy of the Speaker's Conclusions
162(1)
Improving Listening Competence
163(1)
Listening and Technology
164(1)
Summary
165(1)
Discussion Starters
166(1)
Notes
166(2)
PART TWO Connecting in the Public Context
Selecting a Topic and Relating to the Audience
168(30)
Selecting a Speech Topic
172(8)
Selecting an Appropriate Topic
172(2)
Techniques for Finding a Topic
174(5)
Assessing the Appropriateness of a Topic
179(1)
Narrowing the Topic
179(1)
Determining the General Purpose, Specific Purpose, and Thesis of a Speech
180(5)
The General Purpose
180(2)
The Specific Purpose
182(2)
The Thesis
184(1)
Relating to the Audience
185(10)
Understanding the Audience's Point of View
186(1)
Captive Versus Voluntary Participants
186(1)
Key Audience Information
187(5)
Ways to Learn About the Audience
192(3)
Summary
195(1)
Discussion Starters
196(1)
Notes
197(1)
Gathering and Using Information
198(24)
Gathering Information
200(8)
Using Yourself as a Source of Information
200(1)
The Interview as a Source of Information
200(3)
The Library as a Source of Information
203(1)
Electronic Information Sources
204(2)
Surfing the Web: The Internet as a Source of Information
206(2)
Suggestions for Doing Research
208(1)
Using Research to Support and Clarify Ideas
209(11)
Testimony
211(2)
Examples
213(3)
Definitions
216(1)
Statistics
217(3)
Summary
220(1)
Discussion Starters
221(1)
Notes
221(1)
Organizing and Outlining Your Speech
222(36)
Organize the Body of Your Speech
224(11)
Develop the Main Points
224(4)
Order the Main Points
228(5)
Connect the Main Points
233(2)
Support the Main Points
235(1)
Organize the Introduction of Your Speech
235(6)
Orient the Audience to the Topic
235(3)
Motivate the Audience to Listen
238(1)
Forecast the Main Points
238(3)
Organize the Conclusion of Your Speech
241(2)
Show That You Are Finishing the Speech
242(1)
Make Your Thesis Clear
242(1)
Review the Main Points
242(1)
End with a Memorable Thought
242(1)
Outline Your Speech
243(12)
The Preliminary Outline
245(1)
The Full-Content Outline
246(4)
The Presentational Outline
250(5)
Summary
255(1)
Discussion Starters
256(1)
Answers and Explanations
256(1)
Notes
257(1)
Managing Anxiety and Delivering Your Speech
258(38)
Qualities of Effective Speakers
260(3)
Ethics
260(1)
Knowledge
261(1)
Preparation
262(1)
Self-Confidence
263(1)
Managing Speech Anxiety
263(8)
Communication Apprehension
264(1)
Symptoms of Speech Anxiety
264(1)
Causes of Speech Anxiety
265(2)
Speech Anxiety and Other Cultures
267(1)
Treating Speech Anxiety
268(3)
Methods of Delivery
271(5)
Impromptu Delivery
273(1)
Manuscript Delivery
274(1)
Memorized Delivery
274(1)
Extemporaneous Delivery
275(1)
Vocal and Physical Aspects of Delivery
276(8)
Vocal Aspects
276(4)
Physical Aspects
280(4)
Presentational Aids
284(9)
Choosing and Using Presentational Aids
284(1)
Kinds of Presentational Aids
285(4)
Methods of Presentation
289(2)
Computer-Generated Presentational Aids
291(1)
Developing Presentational Aids
292(1)
Polishing Your Delivery
293(1)
Summary
293(1)
Discussion Starters
294(1)
Notes
295(1)
Informative Speaking
296(30)
Information and Power
298(2)
Distinctions Between Informative and Persuasive Speaking
300(1)
Topics for Informative Speeches
300(5)
Objects
302(1)
Processes
303(1)
Events
303(1)
Concepts
304(1)
Preparing and Developing an Informative Speech
305(10)
Gain and Maintain Audience Attention
305(2)
Increase Understanding of the Topic
307(5)
Hints for Effective Informative Speaking
312(3)
Evaluating the Informative Speech
315(3)
Topic
315(1)
General Requirements
316(1)
Audience Analysis
316(1)
Supporting Materials
316(1)
Organization
317(1)
Delivery
318(1)
Language Choice
318(1)
A Sample Informative Speech with Commentary
318(5)
Analysis and Evaluation
322(1)
Summary
323(1)
Discussion Starters
324(1)
Notes
324(1)
Appendix: Informative Speech Topics
325(1)
Persuasive Speaking
326(34)
The Goal of Persuasive Speaking
328(3)
Topics for Persuasive Speeches
331(4)
Questions of Fact
332(1)
Questions of Value
333(1)
Questions of Policy
334(1)
Persuasive Claims
335(2)
Establishing Credibility
337(2)
Competence
337(1)
Character
337(1)
Charisma
338(1)
Becoming Effective Consumers of Persuasion
339(1)
Preparing and Developing a Persuasive Speech
340(5)
Researching the Topic
341(1)
Organizing the Speech
341(1)
Supporting Materials
341(4)
Persuasive Strategies
345(1)
Fallacies in Argument Development
345(3)
Fallacies of Reason
345(1)
Fallacies of Evidence
346(2)
Evaluating the Persuasive Speech
348(3)
Topic
348(1)
General Requirements
348(1)
Audience Analysis
348(1)
Supporting Materials
348(1)
Organization
349(1)
Delivery
349(1)
Language Choice
350(1)
A Sample Persuasive Speech with Commentary
351(5)
Analysis and Evaluation
355(1)
Summary
356(2)
Discussion Starters
358(1)
Notes
358(1)
Appendix: Persuasive Speech Topics
359(1)
PART THREE Connecting in Relational Contexts
Interpersonal Communication
360(28)
Interpersonal Communication
362(1)
The Motivation to Communicate and Form Relationships
363(6)
Schutz's Theory of Interpersonal Needs
364(4)
Social Exchange Theory
368(1)
Relationships: Getting to Know Others and Ourselves
369(6)
Learning About Others Through Online Relationships
369(1)
Learning About Others Through Face-to-Face Relationships
370(4)
Learning About Ourselves
374(1)
Self-Disclosure in Relationships
375(10)
The Process of Self-Disclosure: The Johari Window
376(2)
Self-Disclosure and Social Penetration Theory
378(1)
Motivation to Self-Disclose
379(1)
Rhetorical Sensitivity
380(1)
Self-Disclosure and Privacy
381(1)
Cultural and Gender Issues in Self-Disclosure
382(1)
General Conclusions About Self-disclosure
383(2)
Summary
385(1)
Discussion Starters
386(1)
Notes
386(2)
Developing Relationships
388(34)
Forming and Dissolving Relationships
390(17)
Interpersonal Attraction
390(1)
The Need to Associate
391(1)
Physical Attributes
392(2)
Coming Together on the Internet
394(1)
Knapp's Stages of Coming Together
394(3)
Knapp's Stages of Coming Apart
397(5)
Duck's Phases of Dissolution
402(4)
Dialectical Theory: Push and Pull
406(1)
Interpersonal Conflict
407(8)
Conflict: The Major Causes
408(1)
Conflict: Destructive and Constructive
409(1)
Conflict Management: Some Useful Strategies
410(4)
Signs That Show a Relationship Is in Trouble
414(1)
Relational Repair Strategies
414(1)
Improving Communication in Relationships
415(2)
Establish Supporting and Caring Relationships
415(1)
Nurture a Supportive Environment
416(1)
Invite More Communication
417(1)
Summary
417(2)
Discussion Starters
419(1)
Notes
419(3)
Group and Team Communication
422(24)
Small Group Communication: Making the Connection
424(1)
What Is a Group?
425(1)
Group Formation: Why Do People Join Groups?
426(1)
Purposes of Small Group Communication
427(2)
Social Purposes
428(1)
Task-Related Purposes
428(1)
Project or Work Teams
429(2)
Characteristics of Small Groups
431(8)
Interdependence
432(1)
Commitment
433(1)
Cohesiveness
433(3)
Group Size
436(1)
Norms
437(1)
Group Culture
437(1)
Disadvantages of Small Groups
438(1)
Gender Differences in Group Communication
439(1)
Ethical Behavior in Group Communication
440(1)
Technology and Groups
441(1)
Summary
442(2)
Discussion Starters
444(1)
Notes
444(2)
Participating in Groups and Teams
446(1)
Team Building
447(2)
Setting Goals
448(1)
Determining Roles
448(1)
Developing Identity
448(1)
Leadership
449(5)
Leading a Group
449(1)
Leadership Styles
450(3)
Leadership and Gender Differences
453(1)
Member Participation
454(3)
Roles of Group Members
454(1)
Contributions of Group Members
455(2)
Conducting a Meeting
457(1)
Problem Solving and Decision Making
458(6)
Determining the Problem
459(1)
Discussing the Problem
460(1)
Applying Reflective Thinking to Problem Solving and Decision Making
461(1)
Brainstorming
462(1)
Brainstorming via Technology
463(1)
Managing Group Conflict
464(4)
Conflict and Group Communication
464(3)
Managing Conflict
467(1)
Ethical Behavior and Conflict
467(1)
Evaluating Small Group Performance
468(1)
Summary
468(2)
Discussion Starters
470(1)
Notes
470
APPENDIX Employment Interviewing: Preparing for Your Future 1(1)
Preparing for Job Hunting
1(1)
Career Research on the Internet
2(2)
Choosing a Career
4(1)
Qualities Employers Seek
4(2)
Preparation for an Interview
6(8)
Writing a Resume
7(5)
Searching the Job Market
12(1)
Researching the Company via the Internet
12(1)
Developing Questions to Ask the Interviewer
13(1)
How to Dress for an Interview
14(1)
The Interview
14(3)
Frequently Asked Questions
15(2)
Other Considerations
17(1)
Factors Leading to Rejection
17(1)
Factors Leading to Job Offers
18(1)
Summary
18(1)
Discussion Starters
19(1)
Notes
19
Glossary 1(1)
Index 1


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