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Communication Sciences and Disorders : An Introduction,9780131135185
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Communication Sciences and Disorders : An Introduction

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780131135185

ISBN10:
013113518X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $106.66

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This is the 1st edition with a publication date of 1/1/2006.
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Summary

"Communication Sciences and Disorders: An Introduction provides a comprehensive overview of communication disorders and gives readers access to authentic, real-life examples. This innovative and contemporary text is not only up-to-date in its substantive content, including theory and research, but also brings the field to life for the reader."--BOOK JACKET.

Table of Contents

PART I Foundations of Communication Sciences and Disorders
1(140)
Fundamentals of Communication Sciences and Disorders
2(36)
Introduction
3(1)
What Is Communication?
4(5)
Definition
4(4)
The Purpose of Communication
8(1)
How Does Communication Relate to Language, Speech, and Hearing?
9(12)
Language
11(4)
Speech
15(4)
Hearing
19(2)
What Is a Communication Disorder?
21(8)
Normal and Disordered Communication
21(1)
Communication Disorders and Communication Differences
22(3)
Classification
25(4)
What Careers Are Available in the Field of Communication Sciences and Disorders?
29(7)
Speech-Language Pathology
29(3)
Audiology
32(2)
Allied Professions
34(2)
Chapter Summary
36(2)
An Overview of Communication Development
38(40)
Introduction
39(1)
What Is Communication Competence?
39(8)
Definition
39(8)
What Is the Foundation for Communication Competence?
47(4)
Earliest Foundations
47(4)
What Are Major Communicative Milestones in Infancy and Toddlerhood?
51(13)
Infancy: The Explorer
51(4)
Toddlerhood: The Experimenter
55(9)
What Are Major Communicative Milestones in Preschool and School-Age Children?
64(12)
Preschool Accomplishments
64(7)
School-Age Accomplishments
71(5)
Chapter Summary
76(2)
Anatomical and Physiological Bases of Communication and Communication Disorders
78(28)
Introduction
79(1)
Neuroscience and Human Communication
80(9)
Terminology
80(2)
The Nervous System
82(7)
Anatomy and Physiology of Speech
89(6)
Respiration
89(2)
Phonation
91(2)
Articulation
93(2)
Anatomy and Physiology of Hearing
95(4)
Outer Ear
96(1)
Middle Ear
97(1)
Inner Ear
97(1)
The Auditory Nerve
98(1)
Auditory Brain Center
99(1)
Anatomy and Physiology of Swallowing
99(4)
Three Phases of Swallowing
101(2)
Chapter Summary
103(3)
Communication Assessment and Intervention: Principles and Practices
106(35)
Introduction
107(1)
What Is Assessment?
108(11)
Definition
108(1)
Purposes of Assessment
109(2)
The Assessment Process
111(8)
How Are Assessment Instruments Categorized?
119(8)
Validity and Reliability
120(1)
Types of Assessment
121(6)
What Is Intervention?
127(7)
Definition
127(4)
Purposes of Intervention
131(1)
Intervention Planning
132(2)
Intervention Models
134(1)
How Are Interventions Categorized?
134(5)
Behaviorist Approaches
134(1)
Linguistic-Cognitive Approaches
135(1)
Social-Interactionist Approaches
135(3)
Information-Processing Models
138(1)
Chapter Summary
139(2)
Part II Communication Disorders Across the Lifespan
141
Phonological Disorders
142(38)
Introduction
143(3)
What Is a Phonological Disorder?
146(9)
Definition
146(1)
Prevalence and Incidence
146(1)
Terminology
147(1)
Describing Phonology and Articulation
148(7)
How Are Phonological Disorders Classified?
155(6)
Differentiating Phonological Disorders from Other Speech-Sound Disorders
155(2)
Speech Disorder Classification System
157(4)
What Are the Defining Characteristics of Phonological Disorders?
161(5)
Phonological Disorder of Unknown Origin
161(1)
Phonological Disorder: Otitis Media with Effusion
162(1)
Special Populations
163(3)
How Are Phonological Disorders Identified?
166(7)
The Assessment Process
167(6)
How Are Phonological Disorders Treated?
173(3)
Treatment Paradigms
173(2)
Goals and Targets in Phonological Therapy
175(1)
Discharge
176(1)
Case Study and Clinical Problem Solving
176(2)
Chapter Summary
178(2)
Motor Speech Disorders: Apraxia and Dysarthria
180(32)
Introduction
181(1)
What Is a Motor Speech Disorder?
182(8)
Definition
182(1)
Terminology
182(7)
Prevalence and Incidence
189(1)
How Are Motor Speech Disorders Classified?
190(3)
Etiology
190(1)
Manifestation
190(1)
Severity
191(1)
Characterizing Individual Differences
191(2)
What Are the Defining Characteristics of Prevalent Types of Motor Speech Disorders?
193(5)
Motor Programming and Planning Disorders and Acquired Apraxia of Speech (AOS)
193(2)
Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)
195(1)
Acquired Dysarthria
196(1)
Developmental Dysarthria
197(1)
How Are Motor Speech Disorders Identified?
198(5)
The Assessment Process
198(5)
How Are Motor Speech Disorders Treated?
203(6)
Treatment Goals
203(1)
Targets and Strategies
204(5)
Case Study and Clinical Problem Solving
209(2)
Chapter Summary
211(1)
Language Disorders in Early and Later Childhood
212(42)
Introduction
213(1)
What Is a Language Disorder?
213(8)
Definition
213(4)
Terminology
217(3)
Prevalence and Incidence
220(1)
How Are Language Disorders Classified?
221(2)
Etiology
221(1)
Manifestation
221(1)
Severity
222(1)
Characterizing Individual Differences
222(1)
What Are the Defining Characteristics of Prevalent Types of Language Disorders?
223(11)
Specific Language Impairment
224(2)
Autism Spectrum Disorder
226(3)
Mental Retardation
229(3)
Brain Injury
232(2)
How Are Language Disorders Identified?
234(7)
The Assessment Process
234(6)
The Importance of Accurate Diagnosis
240(1)
How Are Language Disorders Treated?
241(9)
Targets, Strategies, and Contexts
241(4)
The Treatment Plan
245(1)
Intervention Principles
245(5)
Case Study and Clinical Problem Solving
250(2)
Chapter Summary
252(2)
Adult Aphasia and Other Cognitive-Based Dysfunctions
254(30)
Introduction
255(1)
What Is Aphasia?
256(4)
Definition
256(3)
Prevalence and Incidence
259(1)
Risk Factors
259(1)
How Is Aphasia Classified?
260(3)
Behavioral Symptoms
260(3)
What Are the Defining Characteristics of Aphasia Syndromes?
263(5)
Broca's Aphasia
264(1)
Transcortical Motor Aphasia
265(1)
Global Aphasia
265(1)
Wernicke's Aphasia
266(1)
Transcortical Sensory Aphasia
267(1)
Conduction Aphasia
267(1)
Anomic Aphasia
267(1)
How Is Aphasia Identified and Treated?
268(6)
The Assessment Process
268(2)
Prognostic Indicators
270(1)
Designing Treatment Plans
271(1)
Determining the Treatment Setting
271(1)
Measuring Outcomes
272(2)
What Are Right Hemisphere Dysfunction, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Dementia?
274(7)
Right Hemisphere Dysfunction
275(1)
Traumatic Brain Injury
276(3)
Dementia
279(2)
Case Study and Clinical Problem Solving
281(2)
Chapter Summary
283(1)
Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Disorders
284(38)
Introduction
285(2)
What Are Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Disorders?
287(8)
Definition
287(1)
Prevalence and Incidence
288(3)
Terminology
291(4)
How Are Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Disorders Classified?
295(6)
Descriptive Features
295(3)
Causal Classifications
298(1)
A Biopsychosocial Perspective
299(1)
Failure to Thrive
300(1)
What Are the Defining Characteristics of Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Disorders?
301(7)
Unsafe Feeding and Swallowing
301(1)
Inadequate Feeding and Swallowing
302(3)
Inappropriate Feeding and Swallowing
305(3)
How Are Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Disorders Identified?
308(6)
Early Identification and Referral
308(1)
Comprehensive Assessment
308(6)
How Are Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Disorders Treated?
314(5)
A Multidisciplinary Alliance
314(1)
Treatment Contexts
315(1)
Treatment Goals and Approaches
315(4)
Case Study and Clinical Problem Solving
319(1)
Chapter Summary
320(2)
Dysphagia
322(26)
Introduction
323(1)
What Is Dyphgia?
324(6)
The Normal Swallow
324(4)
The Disordered Swallow: Dysphagia
328(2)
Prevalence and Incidence of Dysphagia
330(1)
How Is Dysphagia Classified?
330(5)
Phase Affected
330(1)
Underlying Pathology
331(3)
Severity
334(1)
What Are the Defining Characteristics of Dysphagia?
335(1)
Characteristics of Oral Preparatory Phase Dysphagia
335(1)
Characteristics of Oral Phase Dysphagia
335(1)
Characteristics of Pharyngeal Phase Dysphagia
335(1)
Characteristics of Esophageal Phase Dysphagia
336(1)
How Is Dysphagia Identified?
336(5)
Referral
337(1)
The Clinical Swallowing Examination
337(3)
Instrumental Dysphagia Examination
340(1)
How Is Dysphagia Treated?
341(5)
The Speech-Language Pathologist's Role
341(3)
Nutrition and Diet Considerations
344(1)
Measuring the Effects of Therapy
345(1)
Case Study and Clinical Problem Solving
346(1)
Chapter Summary
347(1)
Voice Disorders
348(38)
Introduction
349(1)
What Is a Voice Disorder?
350(9)
Definition
350(5)
Terminology
355(1)
Prevalence and Incidence
356(3)
How Are Voice Disorders Classified?
359(11)
Vocal Abuse
359(4)
Neurogenic Disorders
363(3)
Psychogenic Disorders
366(2)
Alaryngeal Communication
368(2)
What Are the Defining Characteristics of Voice Disorders?
370(3)
Resonance
370(1)
Pitch and Loudness
371(2)
Phonatory Quality
373(1)
How Are Voice Disorders Identified?
373(7)
The Voice Care Team
373(1)
The Assessment Process
374(6)
How Are Voice Disorders Treated?
380(2)
Treatment for Vocal Abuse
380(1)
Treatment for Neurogenic Disorders
381(1)
Treatment for Psychogenic Disorders
381(1)
Alaryngeal Communication
382(1)
Case Study and Clinical Problem Solving
382(2)
Chapter Summary
384(2)
Fluency Disorders
386(42)
Introduction
387(3)
What Is a Fluency Disorder?
390(3)
Definition
390(1)
Terminology
391(1)
Prevalence and Incidence
391(2)
How Are Fluency Disorders Classified?
393(7)
Etiology Focus
393(4)
Symptom Focus
397(3)
What Are the Defining Characteristics of Fluency Disorders?
400(12)
Core Features
401(2)
Secondary Features
403(2)
Causes and Risk Factors
405(7)
How Are Fluency Disorders Identified?
412(6)
The Assessment Process
413(5)
How Are Fluency Disorders Treated?
418(5)
Borderline Stuttering
418(2)
Beginning Stuttering
420(1)
Intermediate and Advanced Stuttering
421(2)
Case Study and Clinical Problem Solving
423(3)
Chapter Summary
426(2)
Pediatric Hearing Loss
428(40)
Introduction
429(1)
What Is Pediatric Hearing Loss?
429(8)
Definition
429(3)
Terminology
432(1)
Prevalence and Incidence
433(1)
Impact
433(4)
How Is Pediatric Hearing Loss Classified?
437(5)
Etiology
437(2)
Manifestation
439(1)
Severity
440(2)
What Are the Defining Characteristics of Prevalent Types of Pediatric Hearing Loss?
442(4)
Conductive Hearing Loss
442(2)
Sensorineural Hearing Loss
444(1)
Mixed Hearing Loss
445(1)
How Is Pediatric Hearing Loss Identified?
446(10)
The Assessment Process
446(8)
The Importance of Accurate Diagnosis
454(2)
How Is Pediatric Hearing Loss Treated?
456(7)
Communication Choices
456(1)
Amplification and Listening Devices
456(2)
Aural Habilitation
458(3)
Intervention Principles
461(2)
What Is Auditory Processing Disorder, and How Is It Identified and Treated?
463(2)
Defining Characteristics
463(1)
Causes and Risk Factors
464(1)
Assessment
464(1)
Treatment Approaches
464(1)
Case Study and Clinical Problem Solving
465(1)
Chapter Summary
466(2)
Hearing Loss in Adults
468(32)
Introduction
469(1)
What Is Adult Hearing Loss?
470(7)
Definition
470(5)
Terminology
475(1)
Prevalence and Incidence
475(2)
How Is Adult Hearing Loss Classified?
477(4)
Etiology
477(1)
Manifestation
478(1)
Severity
478(3)
What Are the Defining Characteristics of Prevalent Types of Hearing Loss?
481(4)
Conductive Hearing Loss
481(1)
Sensorineural Hearing Loss
482(3)
Mixed Hearing Loss
485(1)
How Is Hearing Loss Identified?
485(2)
The Assessment Process
485(1)
The Importance of Accurate Diagnosis
486(1)
How Is Hearing Loss Treated?
487(9)
Limitations of Current Approaches
487(1)
Amplification and Assistive Listening Devices
488(3)
Aural Rehabilitation
491(5)
Case Study and Clinical Problem Solving
496(1)
Chapter Summary
497(3)
Complex Communication Needs and AAC
500
Introduction
501(1)
What Are Complex Communication Needs?
502(3)
Definition
502(3)
Terminology
505(1)
Prevalence and Incidence
505(1)
What Is AAC?
505(2)
How Is AAC Classified?
507(8)
Symbol
507(3)
Aid
510(3)
Strategy
513(1)
Technique
513(2)
What Are the Defining Characteristics of Common Causes of Complex Communication Needs?
515(2)
Intellectual Disability
515(1)
Cerebral Palsy
515(1)
Autism
516(1)
Childhood Apraxia of Speech
516(1)
Traumatic Brain Injury
516(1)
Stroke
517(1)
Degenerative Diseases
517(1)
How Are Complex Communication Needs and AAC Systems Identified?
517(6)
The Assessment Team
517(1)
The Assessment Process
518(5)
How Are Complex Communication Needs Treated?
523(3)
Meeting Unmet Communication Needs
524(1)
Improving Communication Competence
524(1)
Increasing Participation in Society
525(1)
Case Study and Clinical Problem Solving
526(2)
Chapter Summary
528
References 1(1)
Name Index 1(8)
Subject Index 9


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